Recently in Mobile

  Page 10 of 13 in Mobile  

olloclip-pro-photo-adapter.jpg

The olloclip Quick-Flip Case + Pro-Photo Adapter design has its pros and cons. On the negative side, it doesn't offer much protection against drops. The hard plastic shell is thin and feels a little slippery. And the $48 price tag seems a bit high compared to the competition.

But there is a plus side to this rig, and that's the Pro-Photo Adapter that's included with the case. As it turns out, even though I like the convenience of using olloclip lenses with the flip function of the case, it's been the tripod adapter that I've found most useful. It's actually the real reason I still have the olloclip case on my iPhone.

olloclip-flip-case.jpg

I like the Pro-Photo Adapter because it takes up very little room in my pocket or bag, is super light, has two threaded sockets to make vertical and horizontal orientations easy, includes a "cold shoe" adapter, and it mounts in seconds.

Because it has a fairly low profile, there are days when I just leave it on (especially if I plan on shooting a lot.)

The Bottom Line

If you shoot often with olloclip lenses and want an easy way to attach your iPhone to a tripod, the olloclip Quick-Flip Case + Pro-Photo Adapter is worth consideration. Personally, I think you'll also need a more robust case for when you're not in photography mode. And I do think the price is a bit high for the Quick-Flip Case.

But I do like that tripod adapter...


Nimble Photographer Logo

The olloclip Quick-Flip Case + Pro-Photo Adapter has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Loom in an iPhone

After using Loom for a week to backup photos from my iPhone and iPad mini, I give the service high marks.

I particularly like using the iOS version of Loom. It's easy to navigate and create folders for organization.

The Timeline at the top of the organization panel shows all of your pictures in chronological order. Below that, each of your devices are listed where you can see the photos residing in each of them.

Then, there are the albums. You can create a new album and add virtual copies of pictures to it. I've created my usual Animals, People, Places, and Things collections. When 2014 rolls around, I'll create categories for the new year too.

As for the Web interface, I still haven't warmed up to it. Sharing images has been a challenge, and overall performance is clunky. It's almost as if the designers tried to port the iOS app to the computer browser. My hope would be that they revisit the web interface with fresh eyes.

Aside from that nit, I would say that I'm quite pleased with my first week of using Loom. If you need to augment your mobile photography backup solution, it's worth a look.


Nimble Photographer Logo

This product has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Camera+ 5 for iOS with Processing Lab

highlights-shadows-iphone.png

The folks at Tap tap tap have just released Camera+ 5 for the iPhone ($1.99) with plenty of updates, including The Lab.

Not only is Camera+ a terrific app for capturing images with your iPhone (or iPad), but The Lab adds some dynamite features worthy of your attention.

  • Clarity Pro
  • Tint
  • Soft Focus
  • Film Grain
  • Temperature
  • Highlights and Shadows
  • Vignette
  • And many more...

I just gave the app a run-through from start to finish for this image of my Lowepro Urban Reporter 150 that I posted on Instagram.

When capturing the image, I took advantage of Camera+ controls such as image stabilization and self timer (I was holding a reflector in my other hand). In The Lab, I added a bit of Clarity, recovered some highlights, and used just a bit of vignette to draw the eye to the center of the frame. Capture, processing, and sharing all accomplished on the iPhone 5S.

If you're looking for a new camera app to help you expand your iPhone photography, I would certainly consider this latest version of Camera+. For existing users, the upgrade is free.


Nimble Photographer Logo

This product has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

5 Cool Things to Do with Your Old iPhone

If you decide not to take advantage of Apple's trade in program for your old iPhone, there are plenty of fun tasks for this device. After all, everything but the cellular still works. By any measurement, an iPhone 4 or 4S is still an amazing portable computer.

iPhone 4S Camera

I have an iPhone 4S, and here are some of the things I'll be using it for now to complement my new iPhone 5S.

Use an iPhone an an External Flash

By downloading the free app, External Flash, you can use the LED light on the old iPhone as a fill flash. This can be particularly handy for portraits where you hold the second iPhone up high pointing down at the subject to highlight the hair.

Set Up a Remote Surveillance Camera

I've been testing a nifty app called AirBeam ($3.99) for remote photography. Load the app on to both devices, then you can use the camera from one iPhone to remotely send video to the other. I wrote about AirBeam originally in conjunction with the Galileo robotic stand.

Use as an Audio Recording Device

The iPhone is an excellent audio recording device, especially when outfitted with a high quality mic such as the Rode iXY. You don't have to worry about draining the battery of your primary iPhone during interviews and other extended recordings. And for video, you can put the audio recorder closer to the source for better quality, then substitute the audio track in post production.

Remote Release for Your Digital Camera

I use Triggertrap as a remote release for my cameras and as a high speed trigger for my flash. The app is free, and all you have to do is purchase the appropriate dongle for your camera. In my opinion, Triggertrap is as good as a remote release as you'll find anywhere.

Unlock Your Old iPhone for Travel Abroad

Once you've upgraded to your new iPhone, your cellular carrier will allow you to unlock the previous model. In my case, I apply to AT&T via its online web form to unlock my iPhone 4S.

Once you've done this, you can purchase SIM cards in other countries while traveling, allowing you to have a local phone number and the best rates possible.

Bottom Line: Previous Model iPhones Are Very Useful Devices

If none of these applications interest you, then I would trade in your older iPhone and let someone else put it to use. But if you're like me, my iPhone 4S is going to be busy for months to come... right there in my camera bag, ready to work.


iPad for Digital Photographers

If you love mobile photography like I do, then you'll enjoy iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks versions.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Megapixels and Your Smartphone Camera

Sky, Clouds, and Chimney captured with iPhone 4S

I have a 19" SizzlPix hanging in the kitchen at the TDS Studio. The image was captured with my iPhone 4S. It looks great.

I don't normally make big prints from my smartphone camera. Typically I share them on Instagram, Flickr, Facebook, and here on The Digital Story. But it's good to know that if I wanted to make a big print, I could. And at 8 megapixels or more, I can.

After 8 megapixels, the conversation turns to quality of image. That's the holy grail of digital photography: the better the quality, the more options you have.


"Clouds, Sky, and Chimney" captured with an iPhone 4S and processed in Instagram


In a terrific article over at DP Connect, How many megapixels do you need?, they break down the math that leads us to the 8 megapixel minimum for serious smartphone photography. It's an excellent post that you should read.

Those of us who shoot with iPhones are hoping that Apple's approach to the redesigned camera in the new 5S lives up to their marketing. On paper it looks good: Increase the size of the photo sites, improve the lens, beef up the processor - that's a proven formula for better image quality.

If I had to choose between better image quality and more megapixels, which would I prefer? I'm going with image quality. I don't need bigger files; I want better files. We'll know soon enough. I have my iPhone 5S ordered, and it will arrive next week.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.


Join me on my Instagram site as I explore the world of mobile photography. And now Instagram features 15-second movies too.

Ease in to iOS 7 on Your iPad

I think the iPad is a great way to make the acquaintance of iOS 7. Generally speaking, our tablets aren't as mission critical as our phones, so there's less stress as we learn new ways to work.

iOS 7 Photo Apps on an iPad

There's been plenty of discussion about the redesigned user interface. On my iPad 3 with Retina Display, I think it looks good. I'm still learning where to find certain controls. And there are moments when it feels like someone handed me a different remote to my TV. But with the bigger iPad screen and an attitude of play instead of work, the experience has been anxiety-free so far.

The new Photos app is definitely an improvement. It feels more grown up. The organization is improved with Collections and Moments. Albums worked as before, including access to your Photo Stream. And we have new filters to play with in Edit mode.

Filters in Edit Mode for iOS 7

You might want to check out iOS 7: What Apple's new mobile operating system offers photographers on DP Connect for a few more ins and outs from a photographer's perspective.

Put yourself in position to enjoy the transition. By easing in to it on a non-mission critical device, you can get to know Apple's new iOS, identify the speed bumps, them move it to your important devices when you are ready.


iPad for Digital Photographers

This is the kind of stuff I write about in iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks format.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

iPhone 5s Camera

We're beyond having to make excuses for our Samsung, Nokia, and Apple mobile devices. Yes, I know, the best camera is the one that's with you. That's because for many people, it is their best camera.

The goal of the iPhone 5s is to let you concentrate on the composition without worrying about the physics of photography. In low light, it stabilizes. If flash is required, it fires white and amber LEDs in proportion to balance the color. Burst mode is 10 frames per second. Then it analyzes the sequence and suggests the best shots. And the video isn't bad either, especially the 120 frames per second at 720p.

The iPhone 5s, Samsung Galaxy S4, and Nokia Lumia 1020 are the compact cameras of the modern age. They're smart, agile, and have serious computing power. These are the point 'n shoots I want to have in my pocket all the time. I even use them when I have my DSLR or mirrorless in action. How do you think those behind the seces images are captured?

Photography has always been the art form most influenced by technology. And the latest victim of change is the compact camera. I'm OK with that. Compacts had a good run. But to be honest, I'd rather just carry the iPhone 5s for my snapshots. Plus it makes phone calls too.


iPad for Digital Photographers

This is the kind of stuff I write about in iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks format.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Ricoh Theta - Shoot First, Crop Later

Ricoh Theta

A spherical camera that pairs with your iPhone and is truly pocketable - that's the Ricoh Theta, just announced today.

Capturing spherical images is cool. But maybe not cool enough to spend $399 for a camera. But the idea that you can just hold the Theta up, take a shot, record everything around you, then crop what you want later... now that's interesting.

It's shooting distance is from 10 cm to infinity. So basically everything is in focus. The device pairs with an iPhone running the Theta app that allows you to view and share the images. There's also a Mac and Windows version.

How the Ricoh Theta Works

The device has 4GBs of internal memory and builds Jpeg files. Most of the controls are auto, but it does have exposure compensation. The Theta has a tripod mount and can be controlled remotely by an iPhone running the app.

Ricoh created a few movies that demonstrate its function and capabilities. The device goes on sale in October. If I can get my hands on one, I'll report more.


iPad for Digital Photographers

If you love mobile photography like I do, then you'll enjoy iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks versions.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

WiFi SD Card Shoot Out on DP Review

Eye-Fi Mobi Wireless SD Memory Card

Are you debating between Eye-Fi and Transcend to WiFi-enable your camera? If so, you may want to read the DP Review article, Battle of the Wi-Fi Cards: Eye-Fi vs. Transcend. The author explores various capabilities such as transfer rate, flexibility, and maximum range for transmission.

Interestingly enough, however, DP Review focuses on the Eye-Fi 16GB Pro X2 SDHC and not the more modern Eye-Fi Mobi, that for my money is the best WiFi card on the market right now. In my testing, the Eye-Fi Mobi 16 GB SDHC ($72) is second only to having WiFi built in to your camera, and in some cases it's even better than that.

That being said, there's lots of good information in the DP Review article, and it will help you get up to speed on what to consider in a WiFi memory card.


iPad for Digital Photographers

This is the kind of stuff I write about in iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks format.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Wirelessly transferring Raw and Jpeg files from a Toshiba FlashAir WiFi SD card or a Transcend 32 GB WiFi SDHC card just got a lot easier thanks to the new PhotoSync 2.0 for iPad and iPhone ($1.99).

FlashAir Card Share in PhotoSync 2

In addition to PhotoSync bringing their smart "ease of use approach" to WiFi transfer, photographers can capture in RAW+Jpeg mode, then choose exactly the file type they want during the transfer process.

Choose Raw or Jpeg

The process is easy. Turn on the camera with the WiFi card installed. Go to Settings on the iPad and choose your Toshiba or Transcend card that appears in the Wi-Fi menu. Launch PhotoSync and tap on the red "sync" icon in the upper right corner. Tap on Receive at the bottom of the popup menu. Swipe through the options until you locate your FlashAir or Transcend Wi-Fi card (see the top illustration). Tap on the icon and PhotoSync will connect with the camera. It literally takes seconds to do the whole process.

From this point, simply choose the images you want to copy to the iPad and sync. You can choose to have them land in your Camera Roll or in a specific album you've established for that camera.

And this is only one of 50 new feature in the PhotoSync 2.0 app. Essentially, you can move photos from any device to any device with PhotoSync, now including WiFi SD cards. It's essential gear for mobile photographers.


iPad for Digital Photographers

This is the kind of stuff I write about in iPad for Digital Photographers-- now available in print, Kindle, and iBooks format.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.