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OM-5 vs OM-1 - Which Is Right for You?

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The Secret Lives of Photographers - TDS Photo Podcast

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Culling Is Better in Capture One 23, Much Better

I just spent 15 minutes culling 300 photos from the Eastern Sierra. Thanks to the new Cull Images feature in Capture One Pro 23, the process was not only painless, but enjoyable. Here's how it works.

C1P23-Cull-2.jpg Culling images in Capture One Pro 23.

Two Basic Approaches to Using the Cull Images Tool

There are two basic approaches to culling in C1P 23: at the time of import, or after the images are in the catalog. There's a big difference between the two.

If you're culling directly off the card in the import dialog box, you're determining which images will be copied into the catalog. Pictures that aren't marked for import will remain on the card only. This is presorting in the truest sense.

The second approach is to bring everything into the catalog, then cull, using the star and color label tools to rate the pictures. The upside of this is you have everything you shot on the computer. The downside is you're bringing in a lot of content that you may never use.

Enabling Cull Images

In the Group Overview panel on the left side, make sure Enable Groups is checked. If the images are already on the computer, click on the Cull icon in the upper left first to start the process.

The Similarity default is 75%. That has worked well for me, and I just leave it there unless otherwise needed. The computer will take a few moments to gather the pictures. Once it has, double-click on an image to get the ball rolling.

You will see an enlarged version of the shot you clicked on, plus two vertical columns on the right. The column next to the selected picture contains the images in that group. You can navigate through them using the Up and Down arrow keys.

The column to the far right contains all the images with the group markings. You can navigate from group to group using the Right and Left arrow keys.

If you want to zoom in on a displayed picture, double-click on it for closer examination. Once you're finished with the process, click the Done key in the lower right to return to the standard Capture One interface.

That's all there is to it! Easy. If you forget the keyboard shortcuts, they are available at the bottom of the interface. You can add star ratings via the number keys. The entire process goes very quickly once you get going. Navigate via the arrow keys and mark with the numbers.

C1P23-Sorted.jpg Sorted images in Capture One Pro 23.

Final Thoughts

Culling is one of the least exciting activities (other than keywording). Yet the engineers at Capture One have found a way to make this enjoyable.

Generally speaking, I recommend that you save culling for after the images are already copied to the catalog. But there might be those times, such as grabbing your favorites off a cherished memory card, where culling at import makes sense. I must admit, it's fun to see only your best shots flow into Capture One.

Capture One Pro 23 is available now from capture one.com.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Weekly Podcast

The Secret Lives of Photographers - TDS Photo Podcast

This is The Digital Story Podcast #871, November 29, 2022. Today's theme is "The Secret Lives of Photographers." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It's true: we love our cameras, taking pictures, and hanging beautiful images on the wall. We are photographers. But many visual artists are also talented in other areas of creative expression. I've learned this over the years during casual conversations at workshops and conferences. And many times I've been impressed with the revelations. This week's podcast is dedicated to the secret (artistic) lives of photographers. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 871

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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The Secret Lives of Photographers

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Last week I reached out to our community of photographers who follow me on Substack and asked them about their hidden talents. I got some great responses.

Here in the order of most popular talents are what they shared.

  • Playing a musical instrument.
  • Writing short form essays and articles.
  • Graphic arts.
  • Painting.
  • Songwriting.
  • Drafting.

I also provided an "Other" category where readers could list activities that were not included in the poll. I found some of these fascinating, and want to share a few of them with you.

Barb: "Tapestry weaving is a great addition to Photography. They are both about images but the tactile nature of working with yarn has a fulfillment all its own. They both use color and light but the visualizations are wonderfully different and complimentary."

Evelyn: "Watercolor, ukulele, weaving, spinning and knitting are my things besides photography."

John: "Watercolor painting, graphic design, piano playing. All compliment photography and each other."

Karl: "Wood working , wood turning, copper art, driftwood art."

Carl: "I am furniture maker (22 pieces in our home) and wood turner of both open and closed form vessels."

Jim: "Musically I am primarily and organist and pianist, but six years ago, at age 50, decided to teach myself bass guitar just to learn something new. For my full time work, I am a technical writer, but also enjoy some casual writing and blogging for fun."

Clearly we have a talented audience here. Thanks to everyone who voted in the polls and contributed comments. I thought this was a lot of fun.

Sony Will Supply Apple with 'Advanced' Image Sensor for the Next iPhone

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Sony is set to provide Apple with a "state-of-the-art" image sensor for its next iPhone that will supposedly double the amount of light it can capture and give it the ability to clearly capture a face even with a strong backlight.

Nikkei Asia reports that it has learned Sony will supply Apple and "other smartphone makers" with access to the new image sensor, which the company is producing in response to pressure from Samsung Electronics, which also makes smartphone sensors.

According to the report, Sony's new image sensor doubles the saturation signal level in each pixel which allows it to capture more light while also allowing it to reduce overexposure or underexposure in certain settings. As a result, the sensor is capable of not only better low-light performance, but it is better able to meter starkly different exposures, such as a face that is heavily backlit by the sun.

At the time of the announcement and in that detailed presentation in February, Sony did not say when the new sensor would find its way into consumer devices or even when it intended to manufacture the sensors at scale. Those questions appear to be answered now though, as Sony is preparing to be able to provide it for use in smartphones that are expected to be released in the Fall of 2023.

The latest sensor on the iPhone 14 is already extremely impressive, so adding even more imaging prowess to the smartphone will no doubt further close the gap between standalone cameras and mobile devices.

Canon's new 'Pro' webcam software costs as much as just buying a capture card

You can read the entire article on TheVerge.com.

It felt like companies were offering some goodwill during the pandemic when they released free software that allowed a camera you already own to work as a webcam, but now, Canon's looking for some of that sweet recurring subscription revenue. A new update to its EOS Webcam Utility software adds a bunch of new features, but only as part of a new Pro tier that costs $5 per month or $50 per year.

Opting to pay gets you new features like streaming up to five cameras at once via USB, wireless single-camera streaming, 60fps support, finer controls for custom scene profiles, watermark insertion, control of your camera settings via the UI, and some further granular tweaks. While much of that sounds nice and may make for a better experience when using the EOS Webcam Utility, the Pro version tops out at just 1080p resolution (the free tier is still stuck with 720p). That seems a little paltry for a paid service utilizing a variety of cameras capable of outputting 4K via their HDMI ports.

Look, I get it: Camera companies are thirsty for recurring revenue streams just like everyone else -- and normally, their only source is a pro service program like Canon Professional Services (CPS). But while some of these new features added to Canon's webcam software seem nifty, I can't shake the fact that basic capture cards are really cheap now, and two years of this service costs about as much as buying an Elgato CamLink 4K for yourself -- which supports the same 1080p / 60p and even goes up to 4K resolution without any subscription. As for all the advanced software control, OBS may be a pain in the ass to learn, but it's free to use.

It's a relief to see that Canon will maintain the free tier for owners who just want the basics and can't be bothered to buy additional hardware for streaming, but now it seems like a safe bet that most new features will be kept behind the paywall.

The 2023 TDS Photography Workshop Lineup

  • Inkjet Printing Workshop for Photographers Online Workshop - Nov/Dec 2022 and Nov/Dec 2023. SOLD OUT
  • Maximizing Your Micro Four Thirds Camera Online Workshop - Feb. 2023.
  • Ultimate B&W Photography Online Workshop - April 2023
  • Pt. Reyes In-Person Photography Workshop - May 2023
  • Infrared Photography Online Workshop - July 2023
  • Sedona Arizona In-Person Photography Workshop - Oct. 2023
  • Wine Country in Autumn In-Person Photography Workshop - Nov. 2023

You can sign up for any of these events by visiting our Photography Workshops Page. Inner Circle Members receive a 10 percent discount on all events.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.