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As promised, Fujifilm has released their webcam software for macOS, which now makes it available on two major platforms (Mac and Windows).

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The 1.0 release works on macOS 10.12, 10.13, 10.14, and 10.15, and requires 4 GB of RAM. For PC users, Windows 10 is necessary to run the application. Not all Fujifilm cameras will work. Here's the list of current compatible models.

cameras.jpg

A Mac User Guide is also available.

As we continue to move in the direction of remote work groups and family gatherings online, this is a welcome benefit. You can download the software for either platform here.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #746, July 7, 2020. Today's theme is "The Resurgence of Car Camping for Photographers." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Once again, the car has become our sanctuary. As we learn more about airborne transmission of coronavirus, public places become even less appealing than before. The one place, outside of our home, that we can relax and breath deeply is our vehicles. And by extension, car camping may become our most viable alternative for photography adventure. Here are some tips for a comfortable experience.

The Resurgence of Car Camping for Photographers

The vehicle I've been waiting for, and still have a few years to go before it's available in North America, is the Volkswagen Buzz electric bus. It is a nimble alternative to RVs and trailers, letting me take advantage of highway rest stops and public campgrounds while still easily parking at the grocery store.

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But in the meantime, I've outfitted my Audi A3 to serve the same purpose. You may wonder, how does a tall guy road trip comfortably in a compact wagon? Actually, with the right gear, it is very nice. And I thought that you might enjoy hearing about some of the tricks I've learned over the years for overnight stays on the road. Here are five favorites.

Where You Can Stay and for How Long

For maximum flexibility, it pays to be familiar with the locations and rules for the Interstate Rest Areas that are along the way. In California, for example, there is an 8-hour stay limit. No overnight parking or camping. That means, if you're will to sleep inside your vehicle, you can get a full night's rest. (Some states don't allow this at all; others give you even more time.)

Customizing Your Reclining Seat

If you're like me and don't have your cool electric bus yet, then you can outfit your car seat for a comfortable night's rest. Do this at home before you leave.

In my Audi A3, the passenger seat goes all the way back to touching the back seat. I have a few flat throw pillows, like the kind you would accessorize a couch with, stashed in the Audi. If I raise up the base of the seat, the back goes more flat. I then add a throw pillow to the base where I normally sit, and that evens out the configuration.

Add a stuff-able camping blanket and a travel pillow for your head, and you are set for the night. Generally speaking, I'm pretty tired by the time I set this all up, so that helps too.

Hot Coffee in the Morning

My go-to kit starts with a Jetboil Zip Camping Stove ($68). If you've never used one of these. you will go crazy over it. They are so hot!

Next, I break out my water jug and a packet of Starbucks VIA Instant Italian Roast Dark Roast Coffee. Most rest areas have picnic tables that you can use to brew the coffee. It's delicious and quite civilized.

Charging Up

One of the things that I like about the Audi is that it has an abundance of 12-volt outlets that remain hot even when the engine is turned off. I keep a handful of USB adapters in the glovebox to charge my phone, watch, and iPad mini.

I can also charge my MacBook Pro using a POTEK 500W Power Inverter DC 12 V to 110V AC Car Converter with Digital Display ($39) or one like it. I don't use the laptop as much as I do the iPad mini when working in the car. But the converter is good to have just in case.

Keeping it Cool

It wouldn't be a road trip without a few cold refreshments stashed, plus maybe a string cheese or two. Hands down my favorite storage container for this is the eBags Crew Cooler II ($55).

First of all, the cooler area is just right for most overnight trips. This eBag holds about twice as much as a standard lunch cooler. And its insulation is quite good.

Beyond that, however, I really like the dry pockets on top, front, and both sides. The top area is particularly good for storing protein bars, nuts, condiments, paper towels, and plasticware.

The bag seems to fit anywhere in the car that I need it to, from a tight spot in the trunk, to on the floor in the back behind a front seat.

Handsome, durable, and will last you years - this eBag is a great travel companion.

So, gear up, don't forget your mask and hand sanitizer, and treat yourself to a short getaway. The change of scenery will do you wonders.

Olympus has NOT fallen: exclusive Olympus UK interview

You can read the entire post here on Amateur Photographer.

"Don't panic... business is pretty strong." Olympus UK's Mark Thackara gives a wide-ranging interview and as you can imagine, there is a lot to talk about.

Mark Thackara, Marketing Brand Manager for Olympus UK and a 35 year veteran of the company, met AP's Nigel Atherton and Geoff Harris to cast more light on what's been going on, answer questions about past strategy and future developments, and explain why going full frame still doesn't make sense for them.

How do you respond to negative speculation online about Olympus's future?
I also see a lot of positive comments online. If you want to be able to take your camera in a bag on a plane, with a good range of lenses, the benefits of our system are very clear. The argument about full frame will carry on for ever. It's no different from cars. If you want a Land Rover Defender you will buy one but if you want something more compact you can easily park in town, you will buy a Mini.
Nobody can promise that Olympus will be here in 100 years time, as you can't say that about any brand. What I can say is, we have seen the product road map, including the new lens one, and it's very exciting. The company wouldn't be bringing out news lenses if they didn't believe in the system. We are quietly positive.

So what is your final messages to current Olympus owners, or prospective customers, who might be worried about expanding their system or buying into it?
Don't panic. As far as we are concerned it is business as usual. Businesses change hands and flourish, so there no reason this won't be the case here. I have been through all sorts of ups and downs in my 35 years with Olympus. Our basic technology and core proposition are still very good.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The scanner mode in the iPhone/Mac tandem goes beyond merely taking pictures with your smartphone to using them much in the same way you would with a dedicated flatbed device. There's a lot of functionality here, and these tools can be a real timesaver, especially when you're on the go with your laptop. Here's how it works.

Enable-Scanner.jpg Turn on your iPhone then enable the scanning function in Preview.

IMG_6498.jpeg

How to Scan with Your iPhone

Start by turning on your phone. Then open Preview on your Mac and enable the scanner capability (File > Import from iPhone or iPad). You have the option to take a picture, such as a quick product shot, or go to scanner mode.

Taking a photo is pretty straightforward. The familiar camera interface appears, you tap the button, then have the option to "Retake" or "Use Photo." If you tap on "Use Photo," the image appears in Preview ready to edit or use as is.

The scanning function is even cooler. Once you capture the image, you have the opportunity to crop it before sending it over to the Mac. Move the four corners of the frame until the scan meets your approval. Then tap "Keep Scan." You can continue scanning items until you have everything you need. Once you're done, tap the "Save" button, and all of the scans in that group will all appear on your Mac in a single document. Very nice!

Once the Document is on Your Mac

Now that you have an open Preview document, you can treat in the usual ways. Generally speaking, photos will be saved as Jpegs, and scans as PDF documents. But the choices are entirely yours.

saving-scan.jpg

After a few practice runs, you should be quite efficient capturing high quality scans with the iPhone/Mac tandem. You can use your iPad as well. This is a particularly good workflow for mobile business types with a MacBook Pro.

Give it a try and see what your think.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #745, June 30, 2020. Today's theme is "Olympus Passes the Torch to Japan Industrial Partners." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

By now, I'm sure every Micro Four Thirds camera owner has heard the news. The Imaging Division of Olympus is being carved out and sold to Japan Industrial Partners. As to be expected, much concern and speculation has followed the announcement. And today, I will add my thoughts to the discussion.

Olympus Passes the Torch to Japan Industrial Partners

Olympus-1024.jpeg

I'll share my views on the sale of Olympus Imaging to Japan Industrial Partners. Let's start with the official announcement that I received.`

As you are aware, the Imaging industry has experienced marked declines for several consecutive years. The market is contracting as the smartphone industry grows, and competition has been steadily increasing in the mirrorless interchangeable lens camera segment.

Due to these long term trends as well as recent market contractions due to COVID-19, the Olympus Imaging Business Unit has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Japan Industrial Partners, Inc. (JIP). According to the MOU, both companies are entering into further discussions about the potential transfer of Olympus' long-standing Imaging business to JIP by the end of 2020.

During these discussions, Olympus Imaging will operate business as usual and will continue to deliver innovations to our customers, launching new products as planned. Olympus and JIP are committed to providing our stakeholders full transparency about our intentions as plans solidify.

For more details, please also refer to our corporate disclosure "Signing of Memorandum of Understanding for Divesture of Imaging Solutions Business" dated June 24, 2020. (https://www.olympus-global.com/news/ir/2020/)

Derrick then reviews the Memo of Understanding.

iOS 14 Will Finally Let You Add Captions to Photos

You can read the entire post here on PetaPixel.

If you shoot a lot of photos on an iPhone, you may be happy to know that captions are finally coming to your phone in iOS 14.

MacRumors published screenshots of the upcoming caption, which iPhone users have long requested.

There's a new "Add a Caption" field found under individual photos after you swipe up.

Captions are reportedly synced across all your devices if you've enabled iCloud Photo Library, and you'll be able to view them in macOS Big Sur under the Captions field (which was previously named Description).

The captions will be extremely helpful for locating old photos out of a massive trove due to the fact that they're searchable.

Other photo-related features coming in iOS 14 include new filter and sorting options, better navigation, Live Photos playback stabilization, enhanced Memories, and a redesigned image picker in apps.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The balancing act between being a good citizen during the pandemic and maintaining your sanity while doing so is a delicate one. But it can be done (with a few extra precautions).

roadtrip-1024.jpeg

The goal is to have a short adventure to recharge the creative juices while staying safe and protecting others. In practice, the modifications are minor and worth the effort.

Hands and Face

By now, everyone knows the basics. But they become a bit more important on the road.

I carry a little bottle of hand sanitizer in my pocket and use it whenever I touch a public surface outside my car. For example, a necessary function of any road trip is refueling the car. You don't have to wear gloves, but do sanitize after returning the pump handle and before touching your keys or wallet.

Wear a mask to protect others when you're outside of the car, even if you don't have to go inside the station store to pay. Encounters come out of nowhere and happen quickly. Just keep your face covered until you're back inside your vehicle.

And whenever you have the opportunity to wash your hands with soap and water, take advantage of it.

Restrooms

Going to the bathroom can be a challenge. These days, not all restrooms are open.

The number one thing I learned (pun intended) is to not wait too long to start searching for relief. For example, on my recent road trip, I normally stop at McDonalds for breakfast and restroom break. This time, they had drive through only. Bathrooms were closed. Fortunately, I wasn't at critical mass yet. And I did find a public rest stop about 30 minutes later.

You also may want to invest $10 beforehand in a 6 pack of TravelJohn-Disposable Urinals. Just keep them in the car for those times when things just don't go your way.

Food and Drink

I've found that a combination of bringing my own food and beverages with the occasional stop along the way works great.

Your own supplies allow you to take advantage of public parks and rest areas with tables. Bring a couple outdoor tablecloths to cover the surface before breaking out the meal. This is much easier than trying to sanitize a large surface. Once the meal is over, fold the tablecloth so the side that was against the table is inside the fold. Use a fresh tablecloth for your next stop.

Restaurants with outside patios are also workable. You'll need your mask until seated. But after that, just practice social distancing in the fresh air. This can be a real treat!

Drive through rounds out the dining options. Obviously you don't want to use fast food for every meal, but grab and go works well for a breakfast that allows you to keep moving.

Final Thoughts

A little fresh air and change of scenery does wonders for the soul. And even though big adventures are not practical at the moment, short road trips are quite doable.

With a little planning and a lot of respect for others, you can have a great time and still be a responsible artist. Maybe it's time for a change of scenery.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

As someone who specializes in off-beat camera equipment, I can tell you that digital Olympus was never at the center of mainstream photography. Their approach is different than that of Canon, Nikon, and Sony. That's why so many of us love their gear. And having been through carve-outs before, I can tell you there is life afterward.

P6174169.jpeg

It really comes down to the decisions that will be made over the next two years. When I was with Lowepro, for example, they were sold a couple times. Each investor had their agenda, sales goals, and approach to business. The challenge was, can the two groups come together and move the ball forward? Sometimes new ownership can infuse updated ideas into the brand. Other times, the relationship never gets off the ground. It's really up to the people involved.

We'll have to see which scenario plays out with Olympus. It appears that the new owner, Japanese Industrial Partners, sees this as an opportunity to move the brand forward. I hope they do a better job with Olympus than they did when they acquired Vaio from Sony. Maybe they learned a few things along the way.

And running parallel to this move is Panasonic with their line of MFT cameras and lenses. In all honesty, I don't think they will become major players in the full frame world, especially now that Canon has their mojo working again. But Panasonic has an excellent Micro Four Thirds presence, and they may be able to forge a relationship with JIP that benefits both companies.

What I'm trying the say is: it's not the sale itself that's the issue, it's what everyone does after the sale that's important. And for Olympus, this remains to be seen.

In the meantime, the acquisition adds another storyline to our rebel narrative. Fans of digital Olympus have never been mainstream photographers. When I'm covering events, it's rare that I see another MFT camera there. This doesn't bother me at all. Deep down inside, I kind of like it.

I've been a passionate photographer since I was 11 years old. I shot 35mm Contax when everyone else was shooting Nikon. Now, I prefer Olympus and Fujifilm to the other brands.

It's fun running outside of the herd. There's a lot less dust.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When I was researching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos, I ran a test on a dozen hard drives that had been in storage for 10 years to determine how many of them were still viable.

old-Hard-Drives-1024.jpg

One of the biggest challenges to this experiment was digging up all the cables to connect the devices - FireWire in particular - then finding a computer that had the proper ports (an old white MacBook running El Capitan got the job done).

The results were interesting. Of the 12 drives, 5 of them had failed completely. Every one of the failed drives was a bus-powered portable. In fact, only two of those spun up and allowed me to read/write data.

The remaining 5 drives were the bigger storage models that required external power to operate. Happily, they were still operational. I can't predict how much longer they will last, but they did make it past the decade mark.

Ideally, we would pull out all of our hard drives and spin them up annually. But clearly, that wasn't my practice. And I doubt that many of you have the inclination to do this as well.

One of the things that I recommend in Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is to consolidate the data from this tribe of hard drives on to a larger, more modern storage system, such as the LaCie 8TB 2big 2-Bay USB 3.1 Type-C RAID Array.

This gives you a couple advantages. First, you have all of your archival data on one storage system. Second, you can implement a RAID 1 configuration to automatically mirror the information on multiple drives, helping to protect you from mechanical failure.

Get Serious about Protecting Your Digital Files

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Just over a decade ago on June 16, Olympus added a completely new camera to their lineup: the E-P1. To this day, with the arguable exception of the PEN-F, it was their most handsome Micro Four Thirds design.

Olympus PEN E-P1 My favorite E-P1 kit with 17mm f/2.8 pancake lens and the optical viewfinder attachment. All photos by Derrick Story.

Just before the official launch in 2009, Olympus pulled together a press junket to New York City to introduce the camera and provide the opportunity to test it for our reviews. After a couple days of shooting, I knew this little gem had great potential. It was so light and versatile. I just wanted to have it with me all the time.

Olympus E-P1 NYC June 2009: Press corps on the Staten Island Ferry with PENs in hand. Photo by Derrick Story with the Olympus E-P1.

The basic specs for the first Olympus Micro Four Thirds were quite decent for its time.

  • 12.3 megapixels on a Four Thirds CMOS sensor
  • ESP multi patterned, Center-weighted average (60 percent), and Spot (2 percent) metering
  • Shutter speeds: 1/4000 to 60 seconds, 30 minutes
  • LCD: 3" 230,000 pixel TFT LCD on screen with live preview
  • $899 list price

Olympus PEN E-P1

Two physical things that I liked about the camera, aside from its compact size, were how the "sunken" mode dial (on top) and the vertical sub-dial (on the back) were designed. They were truly unique among the camera's peers. And I thought they were absolutely beautiful. We haven't seen the vertical back dial since... too bad!

The back LCD, handsome as it was, only displayed 230,000 pixels. And unless you had the VF-1 optical viewfinder, you had to compose on that fixed-back, relatively low resolution screen. That wasn't a problem indoors, but out in the bright sunlight it could be a challenge. As a result, outside I shot primarily with the 17mm and the optical viewfinder. It should be noted that even this first model had the beloved Super Control Panel that fills the entire back LCD with vital information.

Olympus PEN E-P1

The image quality was quite good. And the E-P1 instantly became my go-everywhere travel companion. I also used the 14mm-42mm zoom (28mm-84mm equivalent), but the 17mm pancake was my favorite optic on it. I was rarely concerned about the 12MP resolution (my Nikon D700 is 12MP as well), the color was excellent, and the E-P1 was packed with many creative features, such as Art Filters that we didn't see on DSLRs at the time.

Olympus PEN E-P1

One very cool feature on the top panel was the Super Sonic Wave Filter indicator (SSWF). When you first turn on the camera, ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove dust and dirt from the image pickup device's filter surface. The tiny blue light next to SSWF flashes during the cleaning process. It only takes a second or two, but I really like the visual indication.

I'm also a fan of the glowing green circle around the On/Off button that lets you know the camera is powered up. Again, this is stuff that you just don't typically see on digital cameras. And those little touches really add to the shooting experience.

P6174169.jpeg

The Olympus E-P1 is a camera that I will never sell. Even though it's petite, it's a big part of photographic history, and still a good shooter even today. (Although now I like to mount the 17mm f/1.8 on the camera with the optical viewfinder.) And if you want to turn heads in a crowd, just pull out the E-P1. People are fascinated by this neo-classic. And they will ask you what kind of film do you use in it.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #743, June 16, 2020. Today's theme is "Questions I'm Asking Myself Before Wielding a Camera Out on the Streets." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I saw an aerial photograph yesterday of a weekend protest in Los Angeles. For as far as the eye could see, people filled a wide boulevard from side to side. As a street photographer, my initial impulse was to be a part of it; to document this momentous moment in time. But I had to remind myself that this is not a Sunday farmers market, and that I need to be honest about justifying my presence. Those thoughts are the lead story of today's TDS photography podcast.

Questions I'm Asking Myself Before Wielding a Camera Out on the Streets

Over the years I've earned a fair amount of street creed for my urban photography. I've lead workshops, published photos, and written articles. But all of that means nothing right now in any big city in America.

DSCF1631-Downtown-Santa-Rosa-BLM-1024.jpg

Why? Because what's going on at the moment is far more important than any photo project that I'm working on. To be honest, my credentials are not valid in downtown LA, Atlanta, or Minneapolis.

That doesn't mean that I stand on the sidelines or that I can't document what's going on. But I need to ask myself some hard questions first to help me proceed with integrity.

Here are three of those questions.

  • What is to be gained by my presence?
  • - My view is, that every person who is peacefully protesting has purpose. So, as a photographer, what would mine be? To be able to post a cool image in Instagram is not a legitimate reason to be there taking pictures. I need to be better than that.

  • Am I confident that my images would send the message that I intend? - This is a tricky one. People are often blinded by their biases. A perfect example is someone who tells you they don't have any. My personal feeling is that we need some knowledge about our subject to accurately report on it. I have never been on the receiving end of racism. And even though I hate the thought of it, I may not be qualified to document it. Bottom line, I'm not confident that I know where all of my blind spots are. I want to do the right thing.
  • What is the best way for me to participate? - I think by doing this. By offering things to consider to help our community of photographers come as close to their intentions as possible. To urge people to look inside before taking their cameras outside and putting them in the face of another.

Photography can be such a powerful medium. And I think this moment in time presents a good opportunity for us to talk about the responsibilities that come with that power.

One ideal that I've tried to embrace over the years when taking pictures on the street is to show respect for life and acknowledge that my view of the world is probably different than many of those whom I photograph. So far, that guiding light has served me well.

So, in that spirit, I'm going to try to be as honest with myself before taking my camera out on to the streets.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

Are Canon's Rumored Super-Telephoto Lenses a Serious Threat to Olympus?

You can read the entire article here that's published on Fstoppers.

Canon is offering super-telephoto lenses as well as 1.4x and 2x teleconverters. What does this mean? A full frame Canon mirrorless body will be able to shoot at 600mm and 800mm, heavily encroaching on where Olympus does its best work, but with a significantly better sensor. Now admittedly, the widest aperture of an f/11 lens and whether the 100-500mm, 600mm, and 800mm are compatible with the teleconverters is up for debate, but it's probably unlikely. I would say 1,600mm at f/22 and the autofocus still working is borderline impossible, but I'm not sure on that matter.

  • Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 STM
  • Canon RF 85mm f/2 Macro IS STM
  • Canon RF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM
  • Canon RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1L IS USM
  • Canon RF 600mm f/11 DO IS STM
  • Canon RF 800mm f/11 DO IS STM
  • Canon RF 1.4x
  • Canon RF 2.0x

Really?

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

organizing-course-graphic.jpg

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

Here's an introduction to the course that will give you a feel for its approach.

linkedin-promo-graphic-1024.jpg

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.