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This is The Digital Story Podcast #862, September 27, 2022. Today's theme is "Confessions from Convict Lake." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Monday is a scouting day for the Eastern Sierra Workshop. The word has been that color is beginning to show at Convict Lake, the southern most destination on my itinerary. I began the day in Walker. After two cups of coffee, I head south. And I'm bringing you along for the ride. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 862

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Confessions from Convict Lake

P9267319-Eastern-Sierra_HDR-1024.jpg Convict Lake, CA. Photo by Derrick Story. OM System OM-1 with 12mm-40mm PRO II Zoom.

Audio notes from the road.

The New Nimble Photographer Weekly Newsletter

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

Because of this rotating content, you won't see the same layout each time. There will be a certain freshness about The Nimble Photographer Newsletter that you typically don't see with other publications.

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is a valuable addition to our existing community benefits that include TheDigitalStory Podcast, The Nimble Photographer website, TheFilmCameraShop, and Derrick Story on Medium.com.

How to Sign Up

You can Sign Up for Free to the Nimble Photographer Newsletter and receive each edition weekly in your inbox.

I'm looking forward to sharing lots of great content with you.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #861, September 20, 2022. Today's theme is "Packing Up the VDub for the Sierra." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Highway 395 between Topaz and Bishop is my favorite stretch of U.S. roadway. The world is a different place on the eastern side of the Sierra. And if you enjoy expansive views, roadside motels, and the freedom of everything you need packed in your car, then there's no better place on earth. And that's where I'll be next week for our Eastern Sierra Workshop.

Digital Photography Podcast 861

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Packing Up the VDub for the Sierra

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I want to start with the car when talking about this road trip, because that makes the most sense. One year and three months ago, I drove a 2021 VW ID.4 off the lot and have been exploring the West with it ever since.

It's interesting to read the press about electric vehicles when you own one. They make it sound so hard. I'm going to camp the first night in Coleville on the East side of the Mountain. I'll make one charging stop before that for lunch, top off via the RV hookup in my campsite, and then I have an Electrify America charging station waiting for me in Bridgeport, which is where our HQ for the workshop is located.

People have asked me, "Aren't you nervous taking an EV on a wilderness workshop?" I'm thinking, no radiator, no transmission, no oil pan, no overpriced gas - no problem. Those of you who have road tripped in an EV know what I'm talking about.

Plus, I can seat 5 and all their gear, I have a pull out awning for shade and relaxation, the back converts into a bed for camping, and the car drives like a dream.

Our Beautiful Locations

With a storm passing through right now, we should have great photography conditions, and with luck, some good Fall color. Plus we're going to try a few ambitious shoots.

We're going to photograph Mono Lake twice in one day - first thing in the morning, then last thing at twilight. It's going to be great to see these different shots during the presentation.

I'm saving our Bodie shoot for the end of the day this year. We've always gone in the morning, but this time I want to be there when they close the place down.

In addition too all of the color, we're going to be working with B&W and Infrared Photography. This instantly changes any scene into a completely different look.

And then I have some cool spots down by June lake that are just plain fun to shoot, nice hiking, and very peaceful.

Lab Time is Fun Time

One of my favorite activities of any of our workshops is lab time where we work on our pictures in a group setting. This trip is particularly nice because we get to use the Cain House that's on the premises of the Silver Maple. Built in the 1800s, completely restored, and a lovely place to hang out with our fellow photographers.

The Grand Finale - The Group Presentation

One of the things that make our group presentations so special its that we've developed a group chemistry during the week that carries over to the presentation creating a supportive environment. What a great way to finish the week.

The New Nimble Photographer Weekly Newsletter

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

Because of this rotating content, you won't see the same layout each time. There will be a certain freshness about The Nimble Photographer Newsletter that you typically don't see with other publications.

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is a valuable addition to our existing community benefits that include TheDigitalStory Podcast, The Nimble Photographer website, TheFilmCameraShop, and Derrick Story on Medium.com.

I'm looking forward to sharing lots of great content with you.


Cosina is bringing its Voigtlander 40mm F1.2 Nokton, 35mm F2 Macro APO-Ultron lenses to Nikon Z-mount

You can read the entire article on DPreview.com.

Cosina has announced it's bringing two of its Voigtländer prime lenses to Nikon mirrorless cameras. According to Cosina, the Voigtländer Nokton 40mm F1.2 Aspherical and Macro APO-Ultron 35mm F2 will be available for Nikon Z-mount cameras systems.

The Nokton 40mm D F1.2 Aspherical was previously only available for Leica M-mount and Sony E-mount camera systems. That will soon change though, as Voigtländer will offer a manual focus Z-mount version that has an integrated chip and electronic contacts for transmitting EXIF data and integrating with Nikon's sensor-shift image stabilization capabilities on compatible cameras.

Like the existing models, the Z-mount version is constructed of eight elements in six groups, including two double-sided aspherical elements. It features a 10-blade aperture diaphragm, has an aperture range of F1.2 through F22, uses a 52mm front filter thread and (although unconfirmed in the information) will likely have the same minimum focusing distance of 50cm (19.7").

Cosina is also bringing its X-mount Macro APO-Ultron D 35mm F2 lens to Nikon Z-mount cameras. As you'd expect from a lens designed for a crop-sensor system, however, this model will be limited to APS-C Nikon Z-mount cameras or full-frame Z-mount cameras when shot in Nikon's DX-format crop mode.

This lens will use the same design as its X-mount predecessor, including an optical construction consisting of nine elements in six groups, including three abnormal partial-dispersion glass elements. The lens features a 10-blade aperture diaphragm, an F2 to F22 aperture range, has a minimum focusing distance of 16.3cm (6.4") and uses a 49mm front filter thread.

As with the Nokton 40mm F1.2, this lens has an integrated chip and electronic contacts for transmitting EXIF data and will work with Nikon's sensor-shift image stabilization capabilities on compatible cameras.

The Macro APO-Ultron D 35mm F2 lens is set to be released in October 2022 for $685.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Shoot and Be Seen - TDS Photo Podcast

This is The Digital Story Podcast #860, September 13, 2022. Today's theme is "Shoot and Be Seen." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Ultimately, we take pictures for ourselves. But sometimes it's nice to share them with others. Posting our images online has become a real "hit or miss" endeavor in terms of views and feedback. Today we're going to look at the photo sharing landscape and explore new options for getting our pictures in front of others. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 860

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Shoot and Be Seen

Now that Instagram has gone to the video dogs, and Flickr is feeling longer in the tooth than ever, what are our options for sharing images with others who will actually look at them?

instagram-pub 1024.png

I'll start with a pretty good article titled, 15 Best Social Media Networks for Photographers that was published on photography course.net. It has lots of good details that I won't have time to cover in the show, and I encourage you to go over and take a look.

Social Media Sites They Discuss

  • Instagram
  • Pinterest
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Behance
  • Flickr
  • Visura
  • Fstoppers
  • 500px
  • Vero
  • YouPic
  • Exposure.co
  • Tumblr
  • TikTok

Camera Clubs

If you're lucky enough to have a camera club in your local area, they often facilitate photographer presentations.

Member Only Groups

Sites like DerrickStoryOnline for Inner Circle Members are designed specifically for members and provide a more intimate and ad-free experience compared to most social media sites.

Interview with John Pemberton about F2.8 Press

You can visit f2.8 Press to order their first publication and to learn how to submit your work for consideration.

New Nimble Photographer Newsletter!

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

Because of this rotating content, you won't see the same layout each time. There will be a certain freshness about The Nimble Photographer Newsletter that you typically don't see with other publications.

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is a valuable addition to our existing community benefits that include TheDigitalStory Podcast, The Nimble Photographer website, TheFilmCameraShop, and Derrick Story on Medium.com.

How to Sign Up

You can Sign Up for Free to the Nimble Photographer Newsletter and receive each edition weekly in your inbox.

I'm looking forward to sharing lots of great content with you.

Tell a Friend

I was thinking the other day about how people love to tell me about their favorite podcasts, which I appreciate!

Then, I started thinking, we should be telling our friends about The Digital Story podcast. It's available on every service that's commonly used: Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon, Spotify, and on and on.

If each or our regular listeners told just one friend about this podcast and encouraged them to listen, those should be substantial numbers.

So let's try it! Tell a friend about the TDS Photography Podcast.

Internal Documents Show Instagram Knows Reels Are Failing

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

The document, titled "Creators x Reels State of the Union 2022," was published internally at Meta in August and shows that Reels engagement not only fails to keep up even close to what is seen on TikTok but that it is falling, down 13.6% from the previous month. Even more damning, the report shows that "most Reels users have no engagement whatsoever."

Instagram's Reels issue is apparently one of original content, at least in part. The document notes that nearly a third of the content on Instagram is made somewhere else and reposted to the platform, usually indicated by a watermark in a corner. Meta announced a $1 billion creator payout plan last year to try and bolster original content, but the Journal says that it has only doled out about $120 million of that so far.

Meta spokesperson Devi Narasimhan downplayed the report and tells the Journal that the viewing hours noted in the document were "outdated and not global in scope" and while she declined to disclose other numbers, said that Reels engagement is still up month to month.

For the better part of the last year, Instagram bet everything on a shift to video. Last December, Instagram head Adam Mosseri said that it would put a major focus on video features like Reels into the app in 2022 and up until last month made good on that promise. It began testing turning all video posts into Reels in July, tested a full-screen TikTok-like feed, doubled down on its plan even amid backlash later that month, until just days later walked back those plans as big names on the platform pushed back on Instagram's plans to become a TikTok clone.

But even as Instagram appeared to have curtailed its plans to dump photos in exchange for videos, new trends indicated that Instagram could end up losing both markets to TikTok anyway.

Earlier this month, Mosseri admitted that the company had made a mistake and gone "too far into video." Unfortunately, it might be too late to win back fans who had been pleading with the company to rethink its strategy for the last year.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

IMG_0265.jpeg

Because of this rotating content, you won't see the same layout each time. There will be a certain freshness about The Nimble Photographer Newsletter that you typically don't see with other publications.

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is a valuable addition to our existing community benefits that include TheDigitalStory Podcast, The Nimble Photographer website, TheFilmCameraShop, and Derrick Story on Medium.com.

How to Sign Up

You can Sign Up for Free to the Nimble Photographer Newsletter and receive each edition weekly in your inbox.

I'm looking forward to sharing lots of great content with you.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #859, September 6, 2022. Today's theme is "How to Travel Light and Shoot Creatively." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Your odds of creatively capturing any photo subject increase dramatically when you feel energized and light on your feet. So how do you balance lugging around the gear that you might need with managing ounces, not pounds, of camera equipment. I have some suggestions on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 859

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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How to Travel Light and Shoot Creatively

Peak-Bag-1024.jpeg

My approach over the past few years is to find high performance cameras with compact form factors, then add a select few accessories that give me the greatest options with the lightest weight.

In that spirit, I've put together a list of approaches for your to consider, then adapt to your own brand preferences and needs. Let's take a look.

Starts with the Camera Itself

My two favorite cameras for day tripping are the Fujifilm X100V with the Fujifilm WCL-X100II 28mm lens accessory, and the Olympus PEN-F with the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ Lens. Both cameras are versatile picture takers with many options both in-camera and via accessories. If you want to go prime lens with the PEN-F, then the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f/1.8 Lens is a great option.

Filters

I carry two filter in my day tripper kit - A circular polarizer and the Hoya R72 Infrared Filter.

The polarizer is the most versatile including giving me 2 stops of density if I need it, and the R72 allows me to capture B&W IR images on the fly without carrying my whole infrared kit.

Day Tripping Bag

The Peak Design Field Pouch v2 accommodates either the PEN-F or the X100V plus accessories and is very discrete. Plus the build quality is fantastic.

Instant Photography/Portable Printer

The FUJIFILM INSTAX MINI EVO Hybrid Instant Camera is a super creative instant camera that also allows you to print from your smartphone. I've sent pictures from my X100V to the iPhone and printed them on the Mini Evo in just minutes.

Additional Fun and Noteworthy Accessories

  • Pedco Ultrapod - $21 - So light and versatile. Removable hook and loop cinch strap secures tripod to posts, tree limbs, railings, pack frames, or any sturdy object. Unique ball and socket mount assembly adjusts to multiple positions quickly and easily without having to remove the device. Comes with a cell phone adaptor to allow for taking selfies or video conferencing.
  • Moment MagSafe Mount for iPhone - $39 - Created by the filmmakers at Moment, this is the first mount compatible with MagSafe that includes (2) 3/8 female threads and (3) 1/4-20 female threads. It allows you to mount your phone wherever you want using any 1/4-20 or 3/8 accessory.
  • Slim Filter Pouch - $12 - 4 Pockets Lens Filter Case for Filter Up to 82mm (37mm 40.5mm 43mm 46mm 49mm 52mm 55mm 58mm 62mm 67mm 72mm 77mm),Foldout Filter Pouch with Microfiber Cleaning Cloth.
  • Think Tank Photo Slim SD Card Carrier - $16 - Compact and fits easily in your pocket. Built in business card holder makes for easy identification. Can be attached to clothing with included lanyard.
  • Mechanical Cable Release - $13 - FocusFoto 100cm/39 inch Mechanical Shutter Release Cable Cord with Bulb-Lock Long Exposure Control for Fujifilm S9600 X30 X100s X100T X-Pro2 X-E2 Leica M10 M9 M8 NIK0N Df F4 FM2 F3 F80 Film Camera.

Final Thoughts

With just these very few tools, you can travel light and create fantastic, unique images.

Hasselblad teases X system launch event for September 7

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Hasselblad has posted a teaser on its website for a product launch event on September 7, 2022. The teaser is short on details, but does show off what appears to be an X-series mirrorless camera with a similar design to the company's X1D system.

It also appears as though the lens attached to the camera is new with both an aperture and focus ring. From a cursory glance at the teaser image, the lens has a minimum aperture of F32 and a minimum focusing distance of 45cm (1.5ft).

The livestream event is set to take place at 15:00 CEST (UTC +2) on September 7, 2022. You can set a reminder for yourself on Hasselblad's teaser page.

Tell a Friend

I was thinking the other day about how people love to tell me about their favorite podcasts, which I appreciate!

Then, I started thinking, we should be telling our friends about The Digital Story podcast. It's available on every service that's commonly used: Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon, Spotify, and on and on.

If each or our regular listeners told just one friend about this podcast and encouraged them to listen, those should be substantial numbers.

So let's try it! Tell a friend about the TDS Photography Podcast.

TTArtisan's New 25mm f/2 APS-C Compact Lens Costs Just $55

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.

The company says that it is the "best budget lens" and is making it available for Sony E, Fujifilm X, EOS-M, Micro Four Thirds, Canon RF, Nikon Z, and Leica L mounts and is claiming a massive 95% off sale that makes the lens a very affordable $55. For some reason, TTArtisan thinks that it can claim this lens is worth $10,000 and is just significantly discounted.

At any rate, the company says it has an equivalent focal length to full-frame of 37.5mm, which it says is "close to the natural field of human eyesight" and therefore meets the shooting needs of a variety of subjects. More specifically, it has an angle of view of 61-degrees. TTArtisan says the compact design improves its portability and makes it convenient for use every day.

It is constructed of seven elements in five groups and is a fully manual focus lens with no electronic connection with any of the cameras for which it is designed to work. It features a front filter diameter of 43mm and the lens weighs "around 166 to 189 grams" which is a rather wide range, but that's the best that TTArtisan can provide.

The lens is a relatively fast f/2 that TTArtisan says not only makes shooting in low light possible but also produces a "beautiful bokeh" in the out-of-focus areas. It has a full aperture range of f/2 through f/16 via a seven-bladed diaphragm which is, like the focus, fully manually controlled.

The 25mm f/2 has a close focusing distance of 0.25 meters (about 9.8 inches) that TTArtisan says makes it possible to shoot objects at a closer distance for showcasing detail.

Whether or not the $10,000 value on TTArtisan's website is meant to be taken seriously, $55 for a compact lens with a maximum aperture of f/2 is a very good deal even if the lens doesn't perform super well. For new photographers looking to experiment with a new lens, it is a very low barrier to entry at under $60.

The TTArtisan 25mm f/2 APS-C Compact Lens is available directly from the company's website starting today.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 70 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of the great things about online publishing is the feedback authors receive. We know how many reads, likes, and comments each post garners. And it's fun to gather all of that up and share with readers.

So, in that spirit, here are the five most popular photography articles, with most read at the top and working down, I published on Medium.com this summer.

My Favorite iPhone Portrait Tricks - There is more magic to iPhone portraits than you may realize.

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The Photography Endgame - The challenging landscape for enthusiast photographers.

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5 Ways Your Camera Is Smarter Than You Realize - Today's devices are brilliant. We just have to spend some time exploring their capabilities to fully understand that genius. Here are five places to start.

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My Favorite Vintage Lenses for Creative Photography - All of these lenses give you a different look from their modern counterparts. And they are so much fun to shoot with. I consider them my secret weapon. When photographers look at the images I produce with these vintage optics, they're not exactly sure how I did it.

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Do You Know Where Your Canon PowerShot Is? - Apparently I wasn't the only one bitten by the throwback bug. I started receiving mail from podcast listeners who had rummaged through closets looking for their classic Canons.

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If you enjoy my articles on Medium.com (plus those from thousands of others), you can sign up for a membership. It costs less per month than a Starbucks coffee drink (and lasts so much longer).

This is The Digital Story Podcast #858, August 30, 2022. Today's theme is "So, Which Filter for What?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

You'd think that as smart as our current cameras are, they would eliminate the need for adding filters to the front of our lenses. And to some degree, many of our glass versions have been replaced by digital settings. But not all of them! In today's show I will cover when to use which filter for what, whether it be glass or digital. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 858

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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So, Which Filter for What?

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We'll start with glass filters today, then move into a handful of digital replacements that many of us have available on our mirrorless cameras.

Protection Filters: Yes or No?

Protection filters are a broad class of types that include pure glass, UV coated, and mild color coating often referred to as Skylight.

Many photographers, myself included, feel more comfortable with a high quality protection filter in front of my expensive pro lenses. I like them because they are much easier to clean in the field using practically any soft cloth from a microfiber to a T-shirt.

The key here is to use a multi-coated, optical glass filter that doesn't compromise image quality.

Polarizers and NDs

A circular 2-stop polarizer is the one mandatory filter in my camera bag. They help reduce glare, saturate colors, and slow down shutter speeds.

A neutral density filter does not have the same polarizing effect, but can be purchased in varying densities to slow down shutter speeds for artistic photography.

Many cameras now include a digital ND Filter setting in the menu system. This is something that you want to look for, because Digital NDs are easier to use and always with you. I prefer this to the glass versions, although you can get more extreme effect with the tradition screw-in type.

Filters for B&W Photography

You can better manage tonal rendering at capture if you understand how digital B&W filters work. Look for them in your camera settings.

Cameras that I use by Fujifilm and Olympus allow me to apply digital versions of: yellow, orange, red, and green filters. These settings simulate filtering the light as a physical glass filter would, changing the camera's response to the scene.

  • Yellow Filter - The most versatile of B&W filters. It darkens the sky a bit, sometimes helping clouds "pop" just a bit more, while at the same time lightening greens a little.
  • Orange Filter - More dramatic effects on landscape than yellow with darker skies and snappier rendering of plants and flowers.
  • Red Filter - Boldly darkens skies and brings clouds forward, plus cuts haze and adds contrast. Red filters are good for robust architecture compositions.
  • Green Filter - Helps to lighten up foliage that sometimes can go very dark in non-filtered B&W photography. The effect varies, but worth a look with lots of green in a scene.

The luxury of having these digital filters and previewing their effects in your electronic viewfinder has a wonderful impact on your compositions while standing there before a scene.

Filters for Infrared Photography

Because I have a modified infrared camera, there are six basic filters that I use to create a variety of effects. And even if you don't have a modified camera you can still shoot infrared, but in a more narrow wavelength.

  • 550nm Filter - For modified cameras. Allow in the most visible light color in this set. Good choice for those who like intense infrared color shots.
  • 590nm Filter - For modified cameras. A pleasing balance of visible light and IR color. The most versatile color filter in the set. Good choice for those who like lots of options for their infrared color shots.
  • 665nm Filter - For modified cameras. Less visible light than the other color options in this set. I like it for cool tones and white foliage for color work. Good choice for those who like a bit more constrained color palette for their infrared color shots.
  • 720nm Filter - For modified and unmodified cameras. Mostly used for B&W infrared, but the 720 does let in a little color if you want it. You can use it on both modified and unmodified cameras. Good choice for those just starting out with IR photography. A popular version of this is the Hoya R72 Infrared Filter.
  • 850nm Filter - For modified cameras. Hard core B&W infrared. Can be very dramatic and pleasing. Good choice for those who like crunchy B&W IR.

For more information about infrared filters, their use, and to purchase them, visit Kolari Vision web site.

Final Thoughts

There are plenty of other filters out there, such as graduated neutral density, pro mist, softeners, and more. But getting your head around these will provide you with a great foundation. Then you can take it from here.

Viltrox representative reports Canon told the company 'to stop selling all RF mount products'

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Two weeks ago, DPReview forum member Stig Nygaard made a post in the Canon EOS R Talk forum inquiring why the product page and all accompanying information surrounding Viltrox's AF 85mm F1.8 lens for RF mount cameras was no longer available.

Over the following days, various forum members speculated the reason all mention of the product was removed, with many coming to the same conclusion - that Canon must've told Viltrox to cease selling the product or face some kind of legal consequence. As it turns out, that appears to be exactly what happened, according to a Viltrox representative.

Assuming the information from the representative is true, it's still unclear why Canon would issue such a warning. Past reports have suggested Samyang received a similar notice from Canon after announcing its 14mm F2.8 and 85mm F1.4 AF RF-mount lenses. It's unclear whether third-party lens manufacturers using electronic connections with Canon's RF-mount alone is the issue or whether it's the code, reverse-engineered or otherwise, enabling AF that's causing the issue.

What is clear is that unless Canon reverses course and starts licensing its AF protocol technology to third-party manufacturers, it appears as though any third-party lenses with native RF-mount AF support won't be making it to market.

Interestingly, the Viltrox AF 85mm F1.8 RF II Lens for Canon RF is still available to purchase from B&H Photo for $399, although it's not clear how much longer you'll be able to purchase it.

Tell a Friend

I was thinking the other day about how people love to tell me about their favorite podcasts, which I appreciate!

Then, I started thinking, we should be telling our friends about The Digital Story podcast. It's available on every service that's commonly used: Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon, Spotify, and on and on.

If each or our regular listeners told just one friend about this podcast and encouraged them to listen, those should be substantial numbers.

So let's try it! Tell a friend about the TDS Photography Podcast.

When and where to watch the Fujifilm X Summit on September 8 2022!

You can read the entire article on Digital Camera World.

Fujifilm's X Summit events are the thing to watch if you want to find out firsthand about the company's latest product launches. Luckily, the X Summit is usually a global livestream event that can be watched live around the world - wherever you are online!

We already know that the next Fujifilm X Summit will take place on September 8 2022 at 2pm Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)/ 6pm (GMT), in New York. The link for the live stream isn't up yet, but it usually gets added to the Fujifilm X Series YouTube channel (opens in new tab) close to the event day.

The X system has seen some fantastics flagship APS-C cameras since its launch 10 years ago, and the best Fujifilm cameras (opens in new tab) offer specs to suit many types of photographers. With that in mind, where do we think Fujifilm will go next, and what do we know ahead of the Fujifilm X Summit (opens in new tab) on September 8?

What we can't say - because we just don't know - is what the camera will be called. One guess is just simply the Fujifilm X-H2, or, the Fujifilm X-H2R (with the R standing for resolution). We've written more about what we think the Fujifilm X-H2R could hold (opens in new tab), including a high-resolution 40MP version that's said to be in development.

We'll be adding the livestream link to this page as soon as it goes up, so keep checking back to this page for the latest updates. We'll also be blogging live from the next Fujifilm X Summit on 8 September - follow us then, too!

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #857, August 23, 2022. Today's theme is "Slideshows from the Past." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Of all the eye-popping revelations from the dawn of the digital age, multimedia slideshows burned on to an optical disk were one of the most alluring marvels. The ability to assemble digital images, transitions, and music via DVD made us feel like Hollywood talent. But, 20 years later, how do those creations hold up? And do you even know where they are stored. A look back at our digital roots on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Digital Photography Podcast 857

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Slideshows from the Past

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I reached the pinnacle of my self-produced DVDs in 2002 with the title, Still in Motion.

The disc featured a dozen slideshows divided into categories including: Feature Presentations, Technology Conferences, Weddings, and more.

Most of the images were captured with a Canon G2, processed on a Apple PowerBook G4, and authored using iDVD software. During my studio reorganizing project, I came across the work, and took a coffee break in front of the computer watching the various presentations. During this viewing, five things came to mind.

DVDs are Remarkably Robust - I don't know how much longer I should push my luck with these originals, but they still play great 20 years later. DVDs were a great invention.

I Had a High Tolerance for Image Noise - I was captivated by my Canon G-Series digital cameras. They were far more affordable and portable than their DSLR counterparts. But as soon as the light went below ISO 400, they were noisy buggers. That didn't seem to deter me from shooting in all lighting conditions with them.

The Secret Sauce was Music - It was fun to revisit many of those images, like shots of Jeff Bezos when he still had some hair. But the aspect that made every slideshow enjoyable was the music that went with them. And boy did it sound good via DVD.

The Story Trumps Technology - After a few moments, I forgot about the technical aspects of the images and became entranced by the story they were telling me.

Age Does, and Doesn't Matter - It does matter in the sense of seeing people I know 20 years in the past. Things and people have changed so much in two decades, that these presentations truly feel historical.

Age doesn't matter in the sense of picture quality and production. As I mentioned earlier, I acknowledged the time and tools used to create the pictures, then moved on to the stories themselves.

Final Thoughts

Watching Still in Motion got me wondering, "Are we obsessing about the right things today? Are we putting features and image quality above storytelling and longevity?"

I don't think anyone ever watched a Ken Burns movie with a top of mind thought, "I wished the pictures had a bit more dynamic range."

I think a good exercise is to revisit some of your slideshows from the past, and think about the ones you liked better than others. Maybe there are clues there to help you better understand the work you are creating today.

Canon G9 Review - Vintage Digital

Since we're talking about projects created with vintage digital cameras, I thought I would fire up one of mine and see how it compares to today's compact. I chose the 2007 Canon PowerShot G9. First let me read from what DP Review published in their report in October 2007.

DP Review's Observations (circa 2007)

Until the arrival of the G7 last September the majority of observers had written off Canon's 'prosumer' G range, presuming that the arrival of affordable digital SLRs had effectively killed the market for high-end compacts such as this. Barely a year later the G7 has been replaced by the G9, a relatively minor update that increases the pixel count from 10MP to 12MP and the screen size from 2.5 to 3.0 inches and - more importantly given the outcry caused by its omission from the G7 - the return of raw shooting capabilities. Other minor tweaks include a better grip and the addition of wireless flash capabilities. Everything else; the 6x stabilized zoom, flash hot shoe, classic all-metal design and solid build, expansive feature set and extensive manual control system is carried over from the G7.

  • 12.1 Megapixels (1/1.7" sensor) with RAW mode for maximum image control
  • 6x optical zoom lens (35mm-210mm) with optical Image Stabilizer and SR coating
  • DIGIC III and iSAPS for lightning fast response, superb image quality and advanced Noise Reduction
  • Face Detection AF/AE/FE and Red-Eye Correction in playback
  • 3.0" high-resolution, PureColor LCD II with extra wide viewing angle
  • ISO 1600 and Auto ISO Shift
  • Compact body with dedicated ISO and Multi Control dials
  • 25 shooting modes including full manual control and 2 custom settings
  • Extra telephoto reach with Digital Tele-Converter and Safety Zoom
  • Hot shoe support for Canon Speedlite flashes and optional lens accessories

DP Review Conclusion: IQ-wise the G9 is about as good as it gets in a compact camera (at low ISO - once you get to ISO 400 the gap between most decent cameras is very narrow), and physically it puts virtually everything else to shame. But inside, at the heart of the image capture system, sits the same (or an almost identical) sensor you'll find in a Casio, Canon or Sony point and shoot camera, in all it's 12 megapixel glory. When I mentioned giving Canon credit for listening to feedback on the G7 (and boy was there a lot of feedback) I don't remember anyone crying out for even more megapixels. Whatever drove Canon's top brass to look at the G7 and decide 'I know what it needs! More Pixels!' it certainly wasn't consumer demand.

Derrick's Test Drive

First of all, in terms of size, controls, quality of build - this camera is every bit as fine as something you could buy today. If fires up quickly, has snappy response, and plenty of control. And 12 MPs is nothing to sneeze at.

It accepted a 32 GB SD card no problem, and its RAW files can be read by all of my software. At low ISO, the images looked absolutely fantastic and were very editable.

What's lacking compared to today's cameras is high ISO performance (anything above 400 with the G9 is noisy),WiFi, Bluetooth, and close focusing. But honestly, its performance exceeded my expectations for a 15 year old digital camera.

For fun, I shot some B&W at ISO 800 to see how they would look. The monotone was good, but the ISO 800 noise just wasn't pretty. So I would have to tone that down in post.

All in all, however, I had a blast with the Canon G9. I have 3 batteries, a compact charger, and a lovely soft case for it. I think I'm going to leave it out and do some more experimenting.

PS: You can read my original review of the Canon G9 here Oct. 2007.

Tell a Friend

I was thinking the other day about how people love to tell me about their favorite podcasts, which I appreciate!

Then, I started thinking, we should be telling our friends about The Digital Story podcast. It's available on every service that's commonly used: Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon, Spotify, and on and on.

If each or our regular listeners told just one friend about this podcast and encouraged them to listen, those should be substantial numbers.

So let's try it! Tell a friend about the TDS Photography Podcast.

Best Cameras Under $300

You can read the entire article on Amateur Photographer.

The main features to consider when looking for a camera under £300/$300 are the ISO range, burst mode capability and video quality. If you're going to be shooting a lot in low light, a larger ISO range will be desirable. If video is a requirement, then check the maximum video recording output. If you want to capture action, then you'll need a camera with a higher burst mode feature. You may need to compromise when shopping on a budget so try to prioritise just one or two features to ensure you can find a camera that ticks both your budget and your needs.

  • Fujifilm X-T10
  • Canon EOS 6D
  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
  • Sony A6000
  • Nikon D600
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III
  • Pentax K-5 Mark II

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #856, August 16, 2022. Today's theme is "Mastering Your Autofocus." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Like many other advanced features on our cameras, we often take autofocus for granted. These days, it works that well. But it's also quite customizable. And it's worth taking a few minutes to wander through the camera's AF menu to tailor its performance to our preferred way of shooting. We'll take a closer look on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Digital Photography Podcast 856

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

Mastering Your Autofocus

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As our cameras have improved, so has my trust in their AF systems. I wasn't that long ago that I relied on S-AF for all of my work. I had been burned by mis-focused shots in the past, and I couldn't afford for that to ever happen on the job.

But things have changed. And I thought it would be worth a review of the common AF settings that are available to us so we can put this wonderful technology to work for us.

Single Frame Autofocus S-AF - Still the most reliable way to autofocus a camera. Place the target square on your subject, press the shutter button halfway to lock in the focus, compose, and shoot.

A variation on this technique is to Back Button Focus. This allows you to focus independently of the shutter button by pressing the AF button on the back of the camera. On an OM-1 for example, go to Menu > AF 1 > AF by half-pressing(button symbol)> S-AF> No.

Continuous Autofocus C-AF - Every camera is a bit different in its implementation, but generally speaking, once you indicate what you want in focus, the camera will continuously focus and refocus for you. I've been using this a lot for my event shooting with the OM-1, almost always in burst mode. It's a great way to capture moving action.

A variation on this is Tracking Autofocus. This usually narrows the continuous autofocusing to a specific subject. Where it goes, so does the camera's AF sensor, literally "tracking" it across the frame or coming toward you. Canons and Nikons do this particularly well. Canon calls it Servo. Olympus lists it as C-AF+TR.

Face and Eye Detection Autofocus - This works well when you only have one or two subjects. The camera identifies their face and/or eyes, and automatically focuses on them. This had improved a lot over the years with things like "right eye" or "left eye" AF.

A neat trick is to set this up with back button focus to quickly enable it and have the shutter button use sensor focusing.

Subject Detection - Now we're getting into some sweet computational photography. In this mode, the camera will look for the subjects that you've indicated, and focus on them.

With my OM-1, the options are: Cars and Motorcycles, Airplanes and helicopters, trains and locomotives, birds, and mammals such as dogs and cats. This works remarkable well.

Manual Focus - You take over the focusing chores and use the focusing ring on your lens.

Another area that I've increased trust is the number of focusing points that I have active. I used to use a single point for all of my AF work. But now I've gone to a cross pattern that incorporates multiple AF points, and I position it in the frame using the jog stick. This protects me when there is slight subject movements right at the moment of exposure.

Final Thoughts

I'm trusting my camera's focusing decisions much more than I used to. I'm still a little hesitant with face detection in crowded conditions, but I do use Continuous, Cross Sensor, and Subject Detection regularly. And the results have been very good.

Fujifilm confirms X Summit event in New York City on September 8

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Fujifilm has confirmed its next X Summit event will take place in New York City on September 8, 2022. Fujifilm hasn't shared any details about what all we can expect from the event, but we do know we'll be getting our first glimpse of Fujifilm's X-H2 camera.

After announcing its new X-H2S mirrorless camera at its X Summit event back in May 2022, Fujifilm teased the X-Trans CMOS 5HR, a 40MP CMOS sensor it said would be used inside the company's forthcoming X-H2 camera system. Fujifilm didn't further elaborate on what else we could expect from the sensor and the X-H2 it will be inside, but the tagline for the X-Trans CMOS 5HR is '40MP, beyond the format boundaries.' Compared to the 'stacked layer, ultra fast motion capture' tagline used for the X-Trans CMOST 5HS sensor used inside the X-H2S, it's clear the 5HR - and the X-H2 as a whole - will likely focus on resolution and image quality above all else.

It's unclear if any further announcements will be made beyond Fujifilm's new X-Trans CMOS 5HR sensor and X-H2 camera, but considering Fujifilm's current lens roadmap shows its new XF 56mm F1.2 and XF 30mm F2.8 Macro lens still due for 2022 launches, it's likely we'll see some additional details about these optics.

Whatever the case is, we'll be here providing the latest updates as they're announced. In the meantime, mark your calendar for 6pm UTC for September 8, 2022.

For anybody based in or near New York, Fujifilm is holding one of its 'Fujikina' events in the city on September 10th. This will include demonstrations and talks by a series of photographers and filmmakers, as well as a chance to get your hands on some of the company's latest gear. This is the first time Fujifilm has held such an event outside Japan.

Tell a Friend

I was thinking the other day about how people love to tell me about their favorite podcasts, which I appreciate!

Then, I started thinking, we should be telling our friends about The Digital Story podcast. It's available on every service that's commonly used: Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon, Spotify, and on and on.

If each or our regular listeners told just one friend about this podcast and encouraged them to listen, those should be substantial numbers.

So let's try it! Tell a friend about the TDS Photography Podcast.

Not Using Auto ISO? You're Missing Out

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.

Auto ISO is one of those features that I ignored for a long time, considering it not much more than a gimmick. It wasn't until recently that I decided to try auto ISO, and I quickly realized that I was missing out on a valuable and practical feature.

As the name suggests, in auto ISO mode, the camera will pick the correct ISO value for the scene being metered. Initially, the idea of letting my camera pick the ISO value seemed not only silly to me, but also like a genuinely bad idea, since I was afraid of winding up with grainy images if the camera chose a very high ISO. I was also firmly entrenched in a film shooter's mentality, since I grew up in an era when using ISO 800 film was pushing the boundaries of grain and typically only used as a last resort. Obviously, the world changed a long time ago, but as many of us know, old habits die hard, especially for us photographers!

The beauty of using auto ISO is in the customization possible. The camera doesn't simply pick any appropriate ISO for your exposure, but gives you a number of other options to ensure you don't wind up with extremely grainy or blurry photos. In this article and video, I explain how these features work using a Canon EOS camera, but the basics will work with any camera that has auto ISO, although the customization levels will vary by brand.

Once you've set your camera to auto ISO, you can tell the camera the lowest and highest ISO it is allowed to use using the "Auto Range" menu. At first, I thought of the auto range as a high-ISO cap, leaving the low ISO at 100 and setting the high cap at around 3200, which I felt was the most grain I would want to see in my images. I quickly realized that this was not the best way to use the feature and now fine-tune it a bit more based on the specific shooting conditions and not just on acceptable grain levels.

By far, the most common way I use auto ISO is when shooting in aperture priority. In this mode, the camera picks the shutter speed and ISO, and I just dial in the aperture that I want. As a portrait photographer, selecting a wide aperture is almost always my main concern, and with two small children, I find this to be one of my favorite ways to shoot. I love not having to worry about the camera picking a shutter speed that is too slow for fast-moving kids or an ISO setting that's so high my images are too grainy. By dialing in my auto ISO settings, I am able to retain creative control in situations where I don't have a ton of time to fiddle with settings, in other words, any situation where kids are involved! I have found myself using Aauto ISO with aperture priority more and more when I leave my studio and work in natural light, whether it's taking some snaps of the kids or a concert in a dimly lit venue.

Virtual Camera Club News

Have you been unsubscribed? A number of listeners have let me know that they were unceremoniously unsubscribed from the show. If that happens to you, just go back to the app and click on subscribe.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The typical approach for most photographers is to take a color photo and convert it to black & white while editing. I recently published a podcast talking about my favorite software for doing that. But actually shooting in B&W with your mirrorless camera has a few advantages, and it's really enjoyable.

P7091843.jpeg Captured in Monochrome 2 mode with an Olympus PEN-F. Photo by Derrick Story.

Let's start with the benefits, then I'll share some of my favorite settings.

Why Shoot in B&W?

The components of a successful B&W photograph are often a bit different than their color counterparts. Line and tone become very important in monochrome, and composing an image in your electronic viewfinder in B&W mode helps you see the best combination of elements.

Additionally, the cameras that I use by Fujifilm and Olympus allow you to apply digital versions of traditional B&W filters: yellow, orange, red, and green. These settings simulate filtering the light as a physical glass filter would, changing the camera's response to the scene.

  • Yellow Filter - The most versatile of B&W filters. It darkens the sky a bit, sometimes helping clouds "pop" just a bit more, while at the same time lightening greens a little.
  • Orange Filter - More dramatic effects on landscape than yellow with darker skies and snappier rendering of plants and flowers.
  • Red Filter - Boldly darkens skies and brings clouds forward, plus cuts haze and adds contrast. Red filters are good for robust architecture compositions.
  • Green Filter - Helps to lighten up foliage that sometimes can go very dark in non-filtered B&W photography. The effect varies, but worth a look with lots of green in a scene.

The luxury of having these digital filters and previewing their effects in your electronic viewfinder has a wonderful impact on your compositions while standing there before a scene.

Capturing in RAW+Jpeg

Most cameras apply the B&W effects to their Jpegs, leaving all of your color options available with RAWS. So if you shoot in RAW+Jpeg, then you can view the world in monochrome and come home with lovely B&W Jpegs, but still have your full-information RAW files available for any type of processing, color or B&W. I highly recommend RAW+Jpeg for B&W work.

Setting Up Your Camera for B&W

For Fujifilm cameras, tap the Film Simulations menu. I would start with Monochrome+Yellow, Dynamic range: 100, Sharpness: +1, Highlight tone: +1, and Shadow tone: 0. Many Fuji cameras include their wonderful Acros film simulation as well, which is even bolder than the straight monochrome. So be sure to look at Acros+Yellow (or even Red) too.

For Olympus mirrorless, I recommend setting Custom Picture mode to monochrome. (This is the same menu where you can set Portrait, Vivid, etc.) This alone will render good B&W, but if you have an OM-1, EM-1 II, EM-X, PEN-F, and some others, you can also add a filter (Yellow, Red, etc.) and set Sharpness along with a few other tweaks.

Once you find a combination that you like, I suggest saving them as a Custom Setting (C1, C2, etc.) so that you can easily go back to them when you're in a B&W photography mood. I've found that I shoot B&W more often when I set up the Custom Settings. It's so easy to change gears.

Final Thoughts

Black & white photography is a great option for midday work and other harsh conditions that might make color work difficult. Personally, I prefer urban settings over landscape for monochrome, but there are many great opportunities that will present themselves once you start viewing the world in B&W through your electronic viewfinder.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.