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This is The Digital Story Podcast #762, Oct. 27, 2020. Today's theme is "The Rules We Follow (but not sure why)." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I'm having more conversations than ever about photography, and I think part of the reason is that we're all cooped up and not going to conferences and workshops. One of the things that I've picked up on are some classic self-imposed rules about photography. So I picked a few of my favorites to discuss for today's show.

The Rules We Follow (but not sure why)

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Like practically everything in photography, there are no perfect right and wrongs. Yet, many of us, myself included, find ourselves constrained by rules that should or should not always apply to our work. I thought I would explore a few of these today. And I'm curious if any of these apply to you.

  • The subject should never go in the middle of the frame.
  • I keep the original aspect ratio when cropping.
  • I don't use high ISOs because there is too much noise.
  • I only shoot natural light because flash looks artificial.
  • Program mode is for rookies only.

I comment on each of these in today's podcast.

Fujifilm to improve X-T3 AF performance with new firmware, bringing it more in line with X-T4

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

In addition to announcing a camera, lens and more, Fujifilm has also revealed it will soon release a free firmware update for its X-T3 that will improve autofocus performance and more.

The firmware update will go live on October 28, according to Fujifilm's press release. The improvements should see autofocus speeds more than double, taking focus times drop from 0.06 seconds to 0.02 seconds, bringing the X-T3's autofocus performance more in line with the X-T4.

Fujifilm says it's also improved the algorithm for predicting subject movements, which should result in a >90% 'hit rate.' The Face Tracking and Eye AF algorithm has also been re-written to double the tracking performance in continuous shooting modes.

Other improvements include the ability to use AF in low light levels down to -7EV with the new Fujinon XF 50mm F1.0 R WR lens, a new 'Focus Limiter' feature for setting pre-determined focus ranges, the ability to change the size of Single AF points while recording video and improvements that make it possible for third-party programs to read the ratings applied to pictures in-camera.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the three major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you appear during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Halide gets a major update with upgraded RAW processing and new pricing

You can read the entire article here on The Verge.

Halide has launched a new version of its popular iPhone camera app, now dubbed Halide Mark II, and it comes with a lot of new features. Those include a redesign, upgraded RAW processing, and a new pricing model.

Halide says Mark II features a "bottom-up redesign" with the goal of staying out of your way. All of the photo controls should now be within your thumb's reach, no matter what model of iPhone you're using the app with. There's a new typeface, and even the preview of the last shot you took that sits in the bottom-left corner of your screen matches the curvature of your iPhone's screen. It's all meant to feel familiar to people who use Apple's default camera every day -- but as always, Halide packs in a ton of advanced photography tricks.

The new Mark II version of the app can now capture both RAW and the iPhone's computationally processed photos at the same time through a feature Halide calls Coverage. Most photo filter and social media apps don't accept RAW images, but the benefit of RAW is that you get a photo without any processing applied that you can edit later. The benefit of Coverage means you get two images when you take one photo -- one you can post right away, and one you can edit later. Coverage will be off by default, however.

Mark II also gains a new Instant RAW feature, which "intelligently" develops a single RAW image through a 17-step process without you having to adjust sliders or levels yourself. "Instant RAW can work as a midpoint between a completely unedited RAW and a totally processed JPEG," Halide said in today's announcement blog. The company tells The Verge an Instant RAW image will look different than the JPG you might get from an image with Apple's Smart HDR processing applied. Halide's processing approach was modeled after how film photography develops, the company says. (You can still send your RAW images to other apps like Darkroom for more thorough editing if you want.)

If you've already paid for Halide, you get Mark II for free as well as a year-long subscription with all of the perks that includes. If you're a new Halide user, you have a couple of options. You can pay once for the app, which costs $30 at launch and $36 at some point in the future. Halide says it plans to raise that one-time price as new features are added to the app.

Updates and Such

The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop Begins Its Second Week

Our sold out Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop begins with its first assignment this week.

I've created a new space called DerrickStoryOnline to support our virtual and physical workshops. Those who signed up for the Eastern Sierra event will have permanent access to this growing community. Soon, I will announce our next event. If you want to be a part of this, keep your eye peeled.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #761, Oct. 20, 2020. Today's theme is "Imagine Large Sensor Computational Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

If you followed last week's Apple Event, then you're probably familiar with the term ProRAW, a new format that Apple will be making available on iPhone 12. Among other things, ProRAW attempts to blend computational photography with the benefits of RAW. And it got me thinking: what a shame to waste such a brilliant idea on a small sensor camera. I explain why in today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Imagine Large Sensor Computational Photography

I recently published a piece on Medium.com titled, "The Case Against Full Frame." The point of the article was that the major camera manufacturers are relying on the brute force of a large sensor while smartphones are using machine learning to advance their cause. In other words: brains vs brawn.

computational-photography.jpeg

But what if we could have both? We saw a glimmer of that with Olympus in the E-M1 Mark III and the E-M1X - combining computational photographer with a larger sensor. Aside from the specific processors and engines, we would need software to make it all hang together. And the ProRAW format seems like a reasonable bow to tie everything up.

The thing about RAW, as we all know, is that it's rather dull on its own. Yes, we can apply profiles in Lightroom and Capture One Pro that give us a more palatable starting place. But what if we could go beyond those simple profiles to computational versions that presented us with initial images that knocked our socks off?

Plus, have the added benefit of being able to adjust those initial presentations with non-destructive tools? That would be a workflow that I would be very interested in.

Remember George Bernard Shaw's quote that "youth is wasted on the young." I'm starting to understand what he meant now. But to put it into photography terms, machine learning is wasted on the small. Why do we have to choose between smarts and muscle?

While you ponder that, let me tell you a bit more about Pro RAW.

"ProRAW gives you all the standard RAW information, along with the Apple image pipeline data. So you can get a head start on editing, with noise reduction and multiframe exposure adjustments already in place -- and have more time to tweak color and white balance."

"Get a head start on editing" is really the beauty of this for mobile photographers. Many of us shoot with both an interchangeable lens cameras and an iPhone. But the workflows are much different.

For my Olympus PEN-F for example, I shoot in RAW+Jpeg, use the Jpegs when I nail it, and go to the RAWs if the photo needs a bit more work. On my phone, I rarely shoot in RAW because I have to use a different camera app and the workflow isn't as smooth. Plus, editing RAW files on the phone isn't that fun.

With Apple ProRAW, I don't have to start from scratch with my mobile RAW files. I can enjoy the magic of computational photography, then tweak the results to my personal tastes without compromising the file. This is something that I would love to see expand beyond iPhone photography.

So how do we get there?

I think we need to ask for it. We need to let camera manufacturers know that we want similar benefits that smartphone users currently enjoy. I don't think we can leave it up to them. Because to this point, they just haven't been reading the memo.

Fujifilm Announces the X-S10

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

When you first catch a glimpse of the Fujifilm X-S10, your first thought might be 'this is a Fujifilm?' With a deep grip, more pronounced viewfinder 'hump' and a big dial that adjusts your shooting mode rather than the shutter speed, the X-S10 is something of a departure in design from previous midrange and high-end X-series cameras.

The company describes the X-S10 as a cross between the X-T30 and the X-H1: You get the guts from the former and the design and in-body image stabilization feature (in a new miniaturized form) from the latter. The camera is targeted toward users who may have Canon Rebels or lower-end Nikon DSLRs who want something a little more 'familiar' than a typical Fujifilm camera. And, with a price of $999 for the body - $100 more than the X-T30 - it's not necessarily out of reach for that audience.

  • 26MP X-Trans BSI-CMOS sensor
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilization
  • On-sensor phase detection
  • 3", 1.04M-dot fully articulating touchscreen
  • 2.36M-dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • 30 fps burst shooting with crop (up to 20 fps without)
  • DCI and UHD 4K capture at up to 30p with F-Log support
  • External mic and headphone sockets
  • 325 shots per charge using LCD
  • USB Power Delivery support
  • Single UHS-I card slot
  • Wi-Fi + Bluetooth

The X-S10 is very much a blend of the X-T30 and X-T4 in terms of specs. You get the same sensor, processor and performance of the X-T4, but with things like the EVF resolution and single, slower SD card slot on par with the X-T30.

In terms of pricing, the X-S10 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens is available for pre-order now for $1,399 and should ship on Nov. 19. That's a pretty good deal for what looks like a terrific camera for serious enthusiasts.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Updates and Such

The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop Begins this Week

Our sold out Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop begins with its first assignment this week.

I've created a new space called DerrickStoryOnline to support our virtual and physical workshops. Those who signed up for the Eastern Sierra event will have permanent access to this growing community. Soon, I will announce our next event. If you want to be a part of this, keep your eye peeled.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! If you want to learn more about our Patreon supporters and their community, visit our Inner Circle page.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Podcast Player is Fixed: For those of you with updated Safari browsers, you may have noticed error messages of late. Well, we fixed the problem!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #760, Oct. 13, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Things Photographers Wonder About and Sometimes Debate." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Sometimes it's nice to have someone to bounce ideas off, or just ask random questions. For example, are generic camera batteries as good as the ones offered by the manufacturers at twice the price? Or what do I use if I don't like Lightroom? Well for today, I'm here for you. And I have thoughts on these and more in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

5 Things Photographers Wonder About and Sometimes Debate

I think at one time or another, many of us have had at least one of these questions bouncing around in our heads. Today, we're going to get them out on the table.

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  • Are Generic Batteries OK to Use and as Good as Those Sold by the Manufacturers at Twice the Price?
  • Should I Use Protection Filters or Not? -
  • Do I Really Need a Tripod? -
  • Do I Need a Full Frame Camera to be a Professional Photographer? -
  • What Do I Do If I Don't Like Lightroom? -

The answers to these in today's podcast.

A Big Misstep for Micro Four Thirds: Panasonic G100 Review

You can read the entire article here on the Phoblographer.

The Panasonic G100 has good but not great build qualities. For a camera that costs $747.99, I was expecting a little more. The Panasonic G100 does not feel as nice as the Olympus E-M10 IV. It falls quite short of the Fujifilm X-T200 and is behind the Sony a6100 and Nikon Z50: all of which have similar price points. The plastic body feels just okay. The texture on the grip feels pretty cheap. All of the dials are plastic, and a few of the buttons feel mushy when pressed. The on/off switch honestly feels like it might break. I'm sure the camera will stand up to a few bumps and bangs, but it doesn't exactly instill a lot of confidence in me.

Not surprisingly, the Panasonic G100 does not have weather sealing. No weather sealing means you cannot take this camera out into the snow or rain, and the sensor will be more prone to becoming dirty with dust. When a camera doesn't have built-in dust removing features (like the Panasonic G100), dust on the sensor will quickly become a problem. If you're careful with the G100, it should last a while.

I think Panasonic had good intentions with the Panasonic G100, but they missed the mark. The camera will appeal to vloggers because of its small size and weight. The fully articulating screen is nice too, and that's great for both stills and video. The sensor can produce excellent images, and a lot can be done with the RAW files. The colors are pleasant, and you'll find there's plenty of dynamic range. But, there are too many shortcomings. It appears Panasonic thought a higher resolution EVF and LCD would be better than IBIS. To keep the cost down, they could have had either one, but not both. They made the wrong choice. I love the EVF and LCD, but removing IBIS was a mistake.

Panasonic Lumix G100 is capable of producing splendid images, but the autofocus performance, lack of IBIS, and mediocre battery life really harm this camera. At $747.99 (with a kit lens), it's priced a little high. In this price bracket, there are better options out there that perform better in almost every area for hybrid shooters.

How to Get Started with Film Photography (eBook)

This 57-page eBook in universal PDF format provides an excellent introduction to film photography. Along with an abundance of illustrations, you'll learn how to:

  • Find the right camera for you
  • Choose the best film for your kind of photography
  • Discover the lenses that you should add to your kit
  • Learn the ins and outs of film processing
  • Find out how to develop B&W film at home
  • Master basic shooting techniques
  • See how to care for your gear
  • And more!
  • >/ul>

    You can read How to Get Started with Film Photography on your computer, smartphone, tablet, and practically any other electronic device that displays PDFs. So you can always have it with you for reference.

    Get up to speed quickly with film photography and start making beautiful images. Download How to Get Started with Film Photography today!

    Updates and Such

    Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

    B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

    Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

    And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

    See you next week!

    Product Links and Comments

    There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

    You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #759, Oct. 6, 2020. Today's theme is "Should You Create a Photography Budget?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Photography gear should not be an impulse buy, especially when that decision sends a $2,500 charge to your credit card. By the same token, new gear helps keep us motivated and creating new images. So how do we balance the two forces? My argument is an approved photography budget. And I'll explain why on today's TDS podcast.

Should You Create a Photography Budget?

Budget-Illustration.jpg

After the first week of shooting with the Nikon Z5 mirrorless camera with its 24-50mm lens, I started asking myself, "where can I reasonably come up with the $1,700 to buy this kit?"

I was so impressed with the images I was making from the Eastern Sierra and Lake Tahoe with the camera. It wasn't too heavy, the compact 24-50mm lens was performing beyond my expectation, and I had lots of Nikon glass that I could use with an adapter. I was so very, very tempted.

Fast forward three weeks later - I boxed up the Nikon Z5 and attached the shipping label to return it to B&H Photo who had let me use it for a month. By this point, I was OK sending it back. I didn't want to, but it was the right decision.

Why? Because that $1,700 plus another $400 for accessories was not in my 2020 photography budget. In fact, we're only in October, and I have less than $700 left to spend. So back to New York the Z5 goes.

Even though on one level I hate them, I'm a big fan of budgets. I have an overall monthly for the business, a break-out budget specifically for gear, and I create budgets for trips as well. Well, I did anyway until 6 months ago.

My photography budget protects me from me. I know how easily a new camera or lens can turn my head. So easily, in fact, that I usually have to create a pros and cons list in addition to a budget to reach a sound decision.

Earlier this year, I wanted the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III. It was $1,800 then. Now you can get one for $1,400. That's still twice as much as my remaining $700.

And I can't justify it because my Mark II is still an amazing camera and I'm currently without photo assignments. I also wanted (and still covet) the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO lens. It's now available for $549. If it's still at that price in late November, I may go for it.

The point that I'm trying to make is that photography budgets bring rational conversations to gear acquisition. And now is the time to start working on yours for 2021.

My is based off the dollar amount that I anticipate I'll have available for investing in new equipment. So that forces me to look at overall projected income and expenses.

Once I have that number, I reduce it by one-third to keep me from accidentally over-spending since other expenses tend to rise unexpectedly.

One tip that I have for married photographers is to complete your analysis well ahead of time, then have it pre-approved by your partner. So now you only have to have one potentially difficult conversation instead of many spread out through the year.

And finally, create a separate gear account and start funding it right way. That allows you to take advantage of programs like Payboo by B&H that saves you paying sales tax and interest if you pay off the purchase by the next billing cycle.

My new camera for the year was the Fujifilm X100V. And I love it as much today as that moment back in March when I first laid hands on it.

I hope I do equally well with my decision making in 2021.

Panasonic Doesn't Expect Olympus Owners to Switch To Its Products

You can read the entire article here on PetaPixel.

In the wake of Olympus' finalized deal with Japan Industrial Partners to assume control of the company's imaging business, Panasonic apparently isn't very hopeful that many of Olympus' Micro Four Thirds photographers will make the jump over to Panasonic camera equipment.

Panasonic has for years seen its positioning of MFT as complementary to that of Olympus, rather than as a direct competitor. While Olympus excels at image quality and technological advancements in still image capture, Panasonic has spent the lion's share of its energy in video capture.

Panasonic expanded out of the MFT market with its S series of cameras which both diversified and bolstered its camera line, while Olympus remained set in its ways with a recommitment to MFT. It's possible to see that refusal to expand as a reason for Olympus needing to bow out of the imaging market entirely, but Panasonic has repeatedly informed us that it does not intend to abandon MFT. And while Panasonic has released several full-frame cameras since its last flagship MFT body, the company will still to this day strongly throw its support behind the format if asked.

I'm curious. Olympus shooters, does this resonate for you? Or are you giving Panasonic a second look?

The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop

I'm thrilled to announce the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on November 6-7, 2020.

This event will be unlike others that you may have read about or even attended yourself. We are taking the popular components of the TDS physical workshops and digitizing them. Here are a few examples.

  • The Opportunity to Share Your Photos with Me and the Class - Even though the live event begins on Friday, Nov. 6, You will receive lesson tutorials on Oct. 21 and 28, then have time to go outside and practice these techniques. If you wish, you can share your favorite images from the practice sessions to be incorporated in the workshop.
  • Small Group for a More Personal Experience - Even though it's an online event, class size is limited to 15 to ensure you have ample opportunities to get your questions answered (by me and other class members).
  • Ongoing Conversations Beyond the Event Itself - I'm setting up a page online that will feature content from our event with the ability for ongoing conversations among class members.

Even though I'm using the Eastern Sierra as a backdrop for my tutorials, your photography and contributions to this workshop could be from anywhere in the world. In other words, it's all about the photography, not the specific location.

Since this is our first online event of this type, the tuition is only $150. Seats are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Sign up today by visiting the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop page at theNimblePhotographer.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #758, Sept. 29, 2020. Today's theme is "The Glass I Love and the Glass I Use." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

No doubt, one of the best investments any artist can make is in quality photography lenses. And I do have some beauties. But what's fascinating to me, is that I have lenses that I absolutely love and would be reluctant to let go of, and then I have those optics I use on a daily basis. And the two aren't always the same. I'll explain on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

V40mm-f:2.jpg

The Glass I Love and the Glass I Use

One of the lenses that I owned for the longest time, I mean decades, was the Canon EF 85mm f/1.8. I bought it new when I was shooting weddings with a Canon EOS Elan 35mm film camera.

I loved that short tele because it was fast (f/1.8), light, quiet focus, handsome, and it took great pictures. In fact, one of the metal prints that I have hanging in the studio was captured with that lens on a Canon 5D in Washington D.C.

As much as I loved that lens, I didn't shoot with it that often. Normally I would have a zoom on the camera body, something like the EF 24mm-105mm f/4. A perfectly good lens that I used daily, but I did not love it. In fact, I hadn't even thought about it until preparing for this podcast. Yet, I still think about the 85mm all the time.

I thought you might be interested to know other optics that fall into one of these two categories, and map them to your own favorites. So here's what we're going to do. I'm going to describe 5 lenses that I currently own, but I'm not going to say which category they fall into until the end of the segment.

As I describe them, as straight as I can, guess which category that each one belongs in: a lens that I love, or a lens that I use. And one of them will be both. Let's get started.

  • Olympus Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ ($224) - Distinguished by its slim pancake form factor, the black M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ from Olympus is a versatile 28-84mm equivalent zoom designed for Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras. Despite its compact profile, this lens includes an advanced optical design, which includes aspherical, low dispersion, and high refractive index elements to achieve a high degree of sharpness and clarity throughout the zoom range. A ZERO coating has also been applied to individual elements to suppress flare and ghosting for high contrast, color-accurate imagery. In addition to the optical design and small size, the lens is also characterized by its Electronic Zoom mechanism, for smooth and constant zoom movements, and a Movie & Still Compatible (MSC) AF system that is quick, quiet, and precise to suit both video and photo applications. (Love It or Use It?)
  • Voigtlander Ultron 40mm f/2 SL IIS Aspherical Lens for Nikon F ($419) - Featuring a slender profile and a slightly wider-than-normal focal length, the black-rimmed Ultron 40mm f/2 SL IIS Aspherical from Voigtlander is a versatile prime well-suited to everyday shooting. The double Gauss optical design employs a single aspherical element, as well as ultra-high refractive index glass, to produce well-controlled, sharp imagery void of spherical aberrations. Its slightly wide focal length pairs with the bright f/2 maximum aperture to benefit making shallow depth of field imagery as well as working in low-light conditions. The smooth manual focus operation also contributes to controlling focus position, and both depth of field and focus distance scales are featured on the metal lens barrel to aid in pre-focusing or setting hyperfocal distance. This lens' physical design also features a scalloped focus ring to recall classic lens designs of the 1960s as well as afford more secure handling during use. Mixing the classic-inspired design with contemporary usage, the lens also sports an AI-S type CPU to permit in-camera adjustment of the aperture setting for faster, more intuitive exposure control.(Love It or Use It?)
  • Pentax HD Pentax DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens ($479) - The black HD Pentax DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens from Pentax is a prime portrait-length lens providing a 35mm-equivalent focal length of 105mm. This short-telephoto 23 degree angle of view is well-suited to portrait and landscape shooting as well as general long lens applications. A high-grade multi-layer HD coating has been applied to lens elements to help minimize flare and ghosting for enhanced contrast, clarity, and color fidelity and a nine-blade diaphragm contributes to an aesthetic out-of-focus quality to benefit shallow depth of field imagery. Additionally, an SP Protect coating has also been applied to the front lens element to effectively protect it from dirt, oil, and finger prints. (Love It or Use It?)
  • Olympus Digital 17mm f/1.8 Lens ($399) - A flexible lens for general shooting, the silver M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f/1.8 from Olympus is a 34mm equivalent wide-angle prime for Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras. The wide field of view pairs with the bright f/1.8 maximum aperture to benefit working in difficult lighting conditions, and it also offers increased control over depth of field for working with selective focusing techniques. The optical design makes use of aspherical and high refractive index glass elements to control spherical aberrations and distortion throughout the aperture range for increased sharpness and clarity. Additionally, a Movie & Still Compatible (MSC) autofocus system is employed to deliver quick and quiet focusing performance and a manual focus clutch can be used for more intuitive adjustment and control over focus. (Love It or Use It?)
  • Olympus Digital ED 75mm f/1.8 Lens ($799) - Characterized by its telephoto design and bright maximum aperture, the black M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm f/1.8 from Olympus is a 150mm equivalent prime for Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras. Coupled with the reach and visual compression of the focal length, the bright f/1.8 maximum aperture enables extensive control over depth of field to make this lens ideal for portraiture applications. Its optical design incorporates three extra-low dispersion elements and two high refractive index elements to reduce a variety of aberrations and color fringing for sharp, clear, and color accurate imagery. A ZERO coating has also been applied to individual elements to suppress surface reflections and flare for greater contrast and color fidelity in a variety of lighting conditions. Additionally, a Movie & Still Compatible (MSC) autofocus system is employed to deliver quick, quiet, and precise focusing performance to suit both video and photo applications.

OK, so are you ready for the answers? Here we go.

Newspaper Navigator Lets You Search 1.56M Newspaper Photos Throughout History

You can read the entire article here on PetaPixel.

The Library of Congress has created something really cool. It's called the Newspaper Navigator, and it's an AI-powered image search that lets you browse through over 1.5 million newspaper photos from over 16 million pages worth of digitized newspapers published between 1900 and 1963.

The Newspaper Navigator project is the brainchild of Computer Science PhD student Benjamin Charles Germain Lee, who is a part of the Library of Congress' 2020 Innovator in Residence Program.

The project is essentially a machine learning-based search engine built on top of the LoC's Chronicling America project; Chronicling America already allows you to search old newspaper photos by text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR), but Lee's Newspaper Navigator takes that to the next level by allowing you to search this same archive by image.

He achieved this by training a machine learning model using thousands of manual annotations created by real people as part of the Library of Congress' "Beyond Words" initiative. That data helped the computer "learn" the difference between image categories like Cartoons, Illustrations, Maps, and Photographs, as well as identifying key content within each image. This allowed him to automatically tag the photos and make the database searchable.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop

I'm thrilled to announce the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on November 6-7, 2020.

This event will be unlike others that you may have read about or even attended yourself. We are taking the popular components of the TDS physical workshops and digitizing them. Here are a few examples.

  • The Opportunity to Share Your Photos with Me and the Class - Even though the live event begins on Friday, Nov. 6, You will receive lesson tutorials on Oct. 21 and 28, then have time to go outside and practice these techniques. If you wish, you can share your favorite images from the practice sessions to be incorporated in the workshop.
  • Small Group for a More Personal Experience - Even though it's an online event, class size is limited to 15 to ensure you have ample opportunities to get your questions answered (by me and other class members).
  • Ongoing Conversations Beyond the Event Itself - I'm setting up a page online that will feature content from our event with the ability for ongoing conversations among class members.

Even though I'm using the Eastern Sierra as a backdrop for my tutorials, your photography and contributions to this workshop could be from anywhere in the world. In other words, it's all about the photography, not the specific location.

Since this is our first online event of this type, the tuition is only $150. Seats are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Sign up today by visiting the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop page at theNimblePhotographer.com.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #757, Sept. 22, 2020. Today's theme is "Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Seems like every endeavor has a component that's not as much fun as the others. In the pursuit of photography, backing up files is a perfect example. But we can make it better. And on this week's show I share five tips toward that goal, plus introduce you to a nifty hardware device that fits right in to our discussion. All of that, and more, on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word

If you've ever seen Dustin Hoffmann in the movie, The Graduate, you'll recognize what I'm about to say. He received sage advice for his career in just one word: Plastics. Well, I have just one word that should be at the foundation of your backing up and archive strategy: Automate.

Backup-graphic.jpg

I will cover a few different techniques today, but at the heart of the process is having as much automation as possible. In my case, I have iCloud and Dropbox grabbing files and storing them without me manually having to do anything. You may choose a different service, but I encourage you to bring as much automation as you can into your backup plan.

Also, just a note on the difference between backing up and archiving. Backing up is what you do during a project to ensure that you don't lose your work. Archiving happens once the project is over in case you need to revisit it. Archives are the final versions. Backups are the works in progress.

You need to be able to tap backups quickly, but archives can live on devices that aren't as speedy, but are indeed reliable.

Here are five additional thoughts to consider when endeavoring to preserve your work.

  • 3-2-1 Rule - 3 copies of your data (1 primary copy and 2 backups), 2 types of storage media (local drive, network share, etc.), one copy offsite (or in the Cloud)
  • Don't Erase Memory Cards Until 3-2-1 Is in Place - Or at least consider your memory cards one of your 3 copies until superseded by something else.
  • Once Your Develop Your System, Test It - You don't want to wait until disaster strikes to discover that you have a flaw in your approach.
  • Spin Up Your Hard Drives at Least Twice a Year - Help them stay healthy with regular tests.
  • Continue to Explore New Technologies that Can Make Your Job Easier - Things are constantly changing in this area. Keep up with those changes to make your approach as easy as possible.

Once I'm not a working photographer anymore, I'm not sure how much content I will retain - maybe just images that have personal meaning to me and those close to me. But until then, I'm trying to make this process as simple as possible.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Kingston DT2000 Encrypted USB Flash Drive Review

Protecting your data during transport involves both physically ensuring its integrity and guaranteeing its safety from other people. The Kingston DT2000 Encrypted USB Flash Drive does both.

Top-Notch Encryption

Kingston's DataTraveler 2000 is designed to be secure, with an alphanumeric keypad that locks the drive with a word or number combination, for easy-to-use PIN protection. DT2000 features hardware-based, Full Disk AES 256-bit data encryption in XTS mode. Encryption is done on the drive and no trace of the PIN is left on the system. It's FIPS 140-2 Level 3 certified, to meet a frequently requested corporate IT requirement.

Feature highlights include:

  • Alphanumeric keypad makes it easy to unlock your device.
  • FIPS 140-2 Level 3.
  • Full Disk AES 256-bit hardware-based encryption.
  • Administrator (Admin) PIN - Enables admin access to the drive and ability to issue new user PIN if user forgets PIN.
  • Can be used on any device with a USB 2.0 or USB 3.1 Gen1 (USB 3.0) port (and I've used via USB-C as well with an adapter).
  • Read-Only Access - Admin can pre-provision a drive with pre-loaded content as read-only for the user.
  • Compatible with: Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, macOS v.10.12.x - 10.15.x, Linux kernel v.4.4.x, Chrome OS, and Android3.
  • Speed: USB 3.1 - 135MB/s read, 40MB/s write; USB 2.0 - 30MB/s read, 20MB/s write.

Bottom Line

After having tested both the Kingston Datatraveler 2000 64 GB model ($153) and the Kingston Datatraveler 2000 128GB model ($234), I can say that they are confidence-inspiring devices.

LinkedIn Learning - Get Serious about Protecting Your Digital Files

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #756, Sept. 15, 2020. Today's theme is "Nikon Z5 Review + New Online Workshop." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The Z5 is Nikon's more affordable full frame mirrorless camera that accepts Z-Mount lenses. I pack one for my scouting trip to the Sierra and report today what I think. And speaking of the Sierra, I'm announcing our online Eastern Sierra Workshop today with all the details. Let's get to it!

Nikon Z5 Review

One of the things that attracted me to the Z5 was the Nikkor 24-50mm f/4-6.3 zoom lens that you can get bundled with the camera. Both together will set you back $1,696.

1024-P9144353-Nikon-Z5.jpg

My thinking was that this tandem would be a good full frame option for hiking and travel. I put that theory to test with an 8-mile hike to Crystal Cove in South Lake Tahoe. Before I tell you how that went, let's take a closer look at the specs for this camera.

Features and Specs

  • 24.3MP CMOS sensor and EXPEED 6 processor afford wide sensitivity to ISO 51200, quick shooting at 4.5 fps.
  • Autofocus system with 273 selectable points, and is a hybrid focusing system that uses both phase-detection and contrast-detection methods
  • A large 3.2" 1.04m-dot LCD screen is available for bright, clear, and vivid image playback and live view shooting. The screen has a tilting design to suit working from high and low angles and it is also a touchscreen for more intuitive operation, navigation, and settings control.
  • A 3.69m-dot electronic finder is present for comfortable eye-level viewing.
  • Dual SD memory cards slots both support up to the UHS-II protocol for high-speed and efficient photo and video file saving.
  • Built-in to the body is a 5-axis sensor-shift Vibration Reduction (VR) mechanism that compensates for up to five stops of stabilization regardless of the lens in use. This system also works with adapted lenses, when using the optional FTZ Adapter, where 3-axis stabilization is used. Also, benefitting video recording, Electronic VR is available to help steady footage to suit handheld shooting.
  • the Z 5 supports UHD 4K video recording at up to 30 fps and Full HD recording at up to 60 fps, with the ability to save movie files to the in-camera memory cards or to an optional external recorder via HDMI out. UHD 4K recording uses a 1.7x crop of the center portion of the frame while Full HD recording uses the entire full frame. Additionally, in-camera time-lapse shooting is also possible with the ability to produce a finished UHD 4K video file directly from the camera.
  • USB charging as well as a dedicated battery charger in the box.
  • A robust magnesium alloy chassis is both dust- and weather-resistant to benefit working in harsh climates and inclement conditions.
  • Focus Shift mode automatically takes a series of up to 300 sequential images while advancing the focus position in each shot. These images can then be stacked into a single image with extended depth of field, making it ideal for close-up shooting of smaller objects as well as for landscapes and other still subjects.
  • What I Liked

    In use, there are many things that I like about the Z5. It feels great in the hands; really comfortable to shoot with. If you hand it to someone, they will likely remark that it feels lighter than it looks (1 lb, 4 oz). And I agree.

    The tilting LCD works very well, as does the EVF. The controls are intuitive and well placed, and the battery lasted the entire day.

    Image quality was excellent! I really liked both the Jpegs and the RAWs (processed in Lightroom CC). I was quite impressed with the 24-50mm Nikkor. It's a gem of a lens and about as compact as you can get for a full-frame zoom.

    Video was also quite good, and I appreciated having both mic and headphone jacks on the left side of the camera. The vibration reduction make handheld recording possible, which is something that I can't do with my Fujifilm X100V.

    A Few Complaints

    I do have my nits, however. The electronic level is quite invasive, in the center of the screen and not really useable for general photography. The camera is also slow to wake from sleep. So much so, that I ended up adjusting the sleep timer to 30 minutes and turning off the LCD. It was worth the tradeoff in battery life.

    Also, I was hoping for a built-in popup flash. I know real estate is at a premium in a mirrorless camera, but having to buy and carry an additional flash for a travel camera is a bit of a bummer.

    And finally, if you want to expand your lens collection beyond the 24-50mm zoom, the Nikon glass feels very expensive to me. I wrote about this in the Medium.com article titled, She's Great, but the Family's a Problem where I pointed out: "I felt a sinking feeling when meeting the Nikon lenses for the Z5. The first relative, a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, was $596 and not easy on the eyes. I know I'm not supposed to say these things, but it's true. The situation became even worse with the 35mm f/1.8 -- $846. That's expensive."

    The Bottom Line

    Unto itself, the Nikon Z5 with 24-50mm zoom is an attractive, robust mirrorless camera that delivers excellent image quality in a reasonably sized package. I certainly can recommend it for photographers already invested in the Z-Mount lens library. For those just starting out, however, your investment can balloon quickly to well over $3,000.

    The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop

    I'm thrilled to announce the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on November 6-7, 2020.

    This event will be unlike others that you may have read about or even attended yourself. We are taking the popular components of the TDS physical workshops and digitizing them. Here are a few examples.

    • The Opportunity to Share Your Photos with Me and the Class - Even though the live event begins on Friday, Nov. 6, You will receive lesson tutorials on Oct. 21 and 28, then have time to go outside and practice these techniques. If you wish, you can share your favorite images from the practice sessions to be incorporated in the workshop.
    • Small Group for a More Personal Experience - Even though it's an online event, class size is limited to 15 to ensure you have ample opportunities to get your questions answered (by me and other class members).
    • Ongoing Conversations Beyond the Event Itself - I'm setting up a page online that will feature content from our event with the ability for ongoing conversations among class members.

    Even though I'm using the Eastern Sierra as a backdrop for my tutorials, your photography and contributions to this workshop could be from anywhere in the world. In other words, it's all about the photography, not the specific location.

    Since this is our first online event of this type, the tuition is only $150. Seats are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Sign up today by visiting the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop page at theNimblePhotographer.com.

    Why These Top Pros are Sticking with Olympus

    You can read the entire article on AmateurPhotographer.co.uk

    Since Olympus announced it was selling its camera division, some owners are questioning whether to stay with the brand. We asked leading Olympus users why they chose the brand and whether they have any plans to change. Here's what they said:

    From there, 11 top pros talk about their favorite Olympus gear and why they have no plans to switch. It's a great read.

    New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

    Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

    Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

    In this online course, Derrick will show you:

    • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
    • How to wire up and configure your kit.
    • Where to find records and what to look for.
    • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
    • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
    • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

    Updates and Such

    Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! You're eligible for a $25 discount to our online Eastern Sierra Workshop. Visit our Patreon page now for all the details.

    How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

    B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

    Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

    And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

    See you next week!

    Product Links and Comments

    There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

    You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #755, Sept. 8, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Years with a Photo Diary." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Back in 2015, when I began my photo diary, the world was a much different place. I didn't know it at the time, but over the next few years, I would experience monumental changes in both my personal and professional lives. Many of those changes have been captured in pictures and words. Today, I'll share a few of those entries, and discuss the value of creating your own photo diary.

5 Years with a Photo Diary

One of the interesting things about a dairy of any type is that you can measure how quickly life changes. Not just your perceptions, but with actual dates and events. Here are a few examples.

photo-diary.jpg

  • Aug. 16, 2016 - Giants Baseball - I packed the Contax 139Q for some street shooting in SF on our walk to AT&T Park for a Giants game. Four of us were going to the game: Zach, Max, Jason, and myself. We took the Larkspur Ferry over to the Embarcadero, strolled for 1 mile to the ballpark, then returned to Larkspur on the Giants Ferry after the game.
  • Dec. 27, 2016 - Apple Photos Book at Barnes & Noble - I was killing some time downtown waiting for the battery to be replaced in my iPhone 6S. So I ducked into our local Barnes and Noble bookstore to see if my The Apple Photos Book for Photographers was in stock. Much to my delight, there was one copy left. So I did what any photographer would do: I faced it forward and took a picture.
  • Jan. 31, 2017 - Ron and Lynn Story - Dad was recovering from his broken hip (and many other things) at Claremont Manor. On the last day of my January visit, I posed them together for this classic portrait. They are both in their 80s. [Note, this is the last photo of my dad that I took.]
  • March 10, 2017 - A celebration of Ron's Life: When my dad passed away near midnight on Monday, March 6, 2017, my family gathered at my sister's house in Huntington Beach California, and at my mother's home in Upland California. The first few days were just taking care of the many, many details that need to be addressed after such an event. Then on Friday, March 10, we had a gathering of family at Dalene's to celebrate Ron's life. This roll of film is from that event.
  • Oct. 19, 2017 - Steve and His 2 Hearts: I was able to take my first bike ride today since the firestorm. The breeze was coming from the west in the air-quality was quite good.
    I packed my camera and rode around the neighborhood. Photographing little things that will help me remember how horrible last week was.
    At one point, I met Steve. He had crafted these two hearts and wanted to post them somewhere to make people feel a little better.
    "I wanted to create a message without words," he told me. I talked with him for a bit more, felt a little better about things, then rode off to complete my errands. Steve had accomplished his goal.

Over the 5 years, I have 920 photo entries. And the more I look at the diary, the more I wish I had added more moments.So I'm going to rededicate myself to this project. After all, now the rebuilding begins, and I don't want to miss any of that!

Using Day One as a Photo Diary

In this spot, I talk about why I use Day One to record the entries for my photo Diary.

Panasonic unveils new 24, 35, 50 and 85mm F1.8 L-mount primes

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

The S5 is at the center of the Panasonic's announcements today, but the company has also revealed plans to release a handful of F1.8 prime lenses. Details are thin at the moment, but we know that S-series 24mm, 35mm, 50mm and 85mm F1.8 lenses are on the way, and that the 85mm will be available in November.

A YouTube presentation by Panasonic shows all four primes as being the same size, each of them smaller (and presumably less expensive) than the existing F1.4 L-mount options at these focal lengths, which will bring some added variety to the growing lens system.

New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

In this online course, Derrick will show you:

  • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
  • How to wire up and configure your kit.
  • Where to find records and what to look for.
  • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
  • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
  • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #754, Sept. 1, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Practically every camera on the market today captures video in addition to still pictures. Yay! But capture is not the roadblock for most photographers turned movie makers; it's the editing that slows them down. I can help with that. Today, I'll show you five different apps that make it easy to trim up your clips and share them with the world. And the best part, you probably already have the software on your computer. I hope you enjoy the show.

5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera

The number one need in the world of amateur video is trimming. If you could easily clean up the beginning of the clip and the end, you've fought half the battle.

QuickTime-Player.jpg

Adding a title or two is another very common request. And then exporting the footage in a format that will work on social is darn important as well.

For these tasks, you don't need to invest in high end video editing software. In fact, you probably have apps on your computer right now that can meet your basic needs. So let's take a look at them and see if any are right for you.

  • QuickTime for Mac - QuickTime Player lets you trim movies, stitch clips together, and move them around once they're on the timeline. Once you've finished your editing, you can export the new file or share it to YouTube and social networks. It's really quite incredible.
  • Photos for Windows and Photos for Mac - There's a nifty video editor inside Photos for Windows 10 that allows you to split and trim clips. So you can do quite a bit of editing once you get the hang of it. Photos for macOS enables trimming of video clips, and then you can stitch them together by creating a Slideshow. You can also create and add graphics there. Here's a good article on editing video using Photos for Windows 10.
  • Photos for iOS on iPad - Funny enough, the iPad is a more powerful machine for editing videos using Photos than the Mac itself. On the tablet you can not only trim, but add filters, adjust colors, tweak exposure, crop, and even add a vignette. Since the iPad and Mac are connected via iCloud, you could use them as a tandem. Edit the clips on the iPad, then stitch them together using Slideshow on the Mac.
  • Lightroom Classic for Mac and Windows: The Classic version is quite good at video editing. You can trim, adjust tone and color, and even play with clips. Check out this excellent tutorial for using Lightroom with movies.
  • iMovie for macOS and iOS: If you haven't looked at iMovie in a while, you should revisit it. Not only is it excellent for editing your videos, you can create trailers and other fun projects. Take a look at trailer I created for the How to Get Started with Vinyl Records online course.

As your comfort level increases, you can push into more sophisticated apps such as Final Cut. But for basic work, it's amazing you can do with software that you probably already own.

Sony to Debut a New Line of 'Compact' Full-Frame Cameras Starting this Month: Report

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.

Sony might have some interesting gear in the works. According to the latest rumors, the company is planning to debut a new line-up of "super-compact" full-frame a7 and a9 cameras aimed at vlogging and travel. And the first one, dubbed the "Sony a7C", will arrive this month.

According to Sony Alpha Rumors, two reliable sources have "confirmed" speculation that Sony is planning to release a new entry-level full-frame camera this month... but they actually said a lot more than that. Apparently, the camera will be part of a new line of super-compact "C" cameras that will live alongside the regular a7 and a9 series.

The first to arrive will be the Sony a7C--an entry-level model, on par with the Sony a7 III--but other "C" cameras are rumored to follow, creating a whole line of compact cameras aimed at vloggers and travel shooters who prioritize portability and features like a flip screen.

The first camera, the so-called Sony a7C, is rumored to arrive sometime in "mid-September" as a sort of hybrid between a Sony a7 III and the a6600. According to SAR, the camera will combine the body of an a6600 with the sensor and performance of the a7 III, the fully-articulating screen of the a7S III, and a pop-up EVF like we've seen on several of the RX100 cameras.

Other specs include a single SD card slot, USB Type-C, both a mic and a headphone jack, and built-in WiFi and Bluetooth. All of this for a little more than $2,000 MSRP at launch. Finally, the "C" line of cameras will allegedly be released alongside a new line of compact lenses to match.

New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

In this online course, Derrick will show you:

  • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
  • How to wire up and configure your kit.
  • Where to find records and what to look for.
  • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
  • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
  • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

You can learn more and purchase the course here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #753, August 25, 2020. Today's theme is "A RAW Look at Image Differences Between Smartphones and Cameras." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As a guy who loves to shoot with both his iPhone and digital cameras, I wondered how much of a difference there is between the two when I shoot in RAW. The smartphone certainly holds its own when it comes to Jpegs. Is it equally competitive with RAW files? So I conducted a test and compared an iPhone X with an Fujifilm X100V. And I share my findings in today's TDS photography podcast.

A RAW Look at Image Differences Between Smartphones and Cameras

RAW File Comparison Left: Fujifilm X100V - Right: iPhone X - Rendered in Capture One Pro 20

I'm a bit surprised that I never set aside the time to do this test before. I enjoy photography with both my iPhone and my Olympus, Fujifilm Nikon, and Pentax cameras. I rarely shoot in RAW on the iPhone, but did so for this test since I capture in RAW on my other cameras. So I wanted a pears to pears comparison.

My subject was a bowl of pears from my yard photographed in natural light. As best I could, I maintained similar angles and avoided exposure compensation. I let the cameras do the work, using the RAW files from each.

To decode and view the images, I used Capture One Pro 20 and Lightroom CC. My cameras were an iPhone X and Fujifilm X100V. I did use camera and lens profiles when they were available, and I did add some warmth to these through white balance. But I let the apps do the rest of the processing using their respective auto enhancements.

BTW: As a point of reference, the DNGs from the iPhone were 12.1 MBs for a 12MP file vs the RAF files from the X100V that are 56.8 MBs for a 26MP image. That is a substantial difference.

After comparing the output, here's what I noticed.

Pears-Side-by-Side-LR.jpg Left: Fujifilm X100V - Right: iPhone X - Rendered in Adobe Lightroom

  • Smartphones continue to impress - There are differences between the two files, which I will note, but overall I wanted to state that the DNGs from the iPhone are quite respectable, especially in terms of detail. Can I tell the difference? Yes I can. But it's much closer than one might initially think.
  • Depth of Field - This isn't a RAW thing so much, but boy is it noticeable. Even when I stopped down to f/5.6 on the X100V, the falloff is so much more pleasing that shooting at f/2.4 on the iPhone, which renders everything sharp.
  • Color Science - The color difference was very noticeable to me. The iPhone had a much harder time rendering subtle hue difference. This was particularly noticeable on the backside of the pear in the upper left corner. There is this wonderful peachy coloring in the Fuji shot, but in all of the iPhone images that area went brown, as if the gamut was narrower for the iPhone. Also, and this will sound funny, the fruit looked much more edible with the Fuji shots compared to the iPhone rendering.
  • Sharpness: Both images are sharp, but the characteristics are much different. The textures on the iPhone pears are more pronounced, almost exaggerated, compared to the more delicate rendering from the X100V. Again, I'm not sure that I would want to eat the fruit in the iPhone shot.
  • Shadows and Highlights: Again, an admirable rendering by the iPhone. The shadows were good with decent gradation. But the shadows from the X100V were more pleasing, and the highlights were brighter, but still retained detail. The iPhone highlights were more controlled with less contrast. I feel the X100V shot has more life.

If I didn't have the X100V RAW files in the same album as the iPhone images, I would say that the iPhone RAWs were very good. And to be honest, they are. But when you compare the two side by side, little differences become quite noticeable.

And I think that is how I would sum up the comparison. If little differences in color science, tonality, and texture are important to you, it's still very worth it to carry a digital camera for the images that you want to draw the most out of in post.

The gulf becomes even wider when it comes to background control. And for a lot of photographers, the conversation would end right there.

Panasonic will announce, via livestream, its new Lumix S5 full-frame camera on September 2

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Panasonic has announced it will hold an online launch event for its new full-frame mirrorless camera, the Lumix S5, on Wednesday, September 2, 2020, at 10 AM EDT.

Aside from the date and time, no further information was shared about the camera or launch event. Panasonic suggests keeping an eye on its Lumix S5 webpage and Instagram account, but we will also update this article with a link to the event when it goes live.

Rumor has it, however, that the S5 will be more compact and affordable than existing options from Panasonic. According to Digital Camera World, "the Panasonic S5 will be one-third smaller and lighter than the S1, has a 24.2MP sensor, 4K, Dual Native ISO, and will cost $1,998. Those specs are pretty compelling. We'll find out for sure soon enough.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

My Expansion into Music and Audio

With two new music titles about to release: "Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs" and "Enjoying and Digitizing Vinyl Records," you may be wondering how these topics fit with the traditional content on TheDigitalStory that is primarily image based.

The answer is: Quite Well!

Audio has always been a part of our world here. This is a podcast for heaven's sakes! And as I look at our changing world and how we might be adapting to it, I see music being a big part of the formula that helps us stay happy and creative.

Plus, one of the side effects to the popularity of digital music is that we're listening more and more on small devices with earbuds and bluetooth speakers. There's no denying that this is highly convenient, but if you play the same music on via a CD or record album on a HiFi stereo, it will sound different. And at times, very different.

From my perspective, this is no more a campaign against digital downloads for music than it is for smartphone photography. They are both here to stay, and I like 'em! But, if we're limited to smartphones for photography and audio, then we are missing a lot. And I want to advocate for richer experiences on both fronts to augment the digital convenience we tend to rely on.

If this resonates with you at all, then please take a look at these two titles that will appear on TheNimblePhotographer site later this week. I'm loving rediscovering music on this level, and I'm hoping that you may as well.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.