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This is The Digital Story Podcast #756, Sept. 15, 2020. Today's theme is "Nikon Z5 Review + New Online Workshop." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The Z5 is Nikon's more affordable full frame mirrorless camera that accepts Z-Mount lenses. I pack one for my scouting trip to the Sierra and report today what I think. And speaking of the Sierra, I'm announcing our online Eastern Sierra Workshop today with all the details. Let's get to it!

Nikon Z5 Review

One of the things that attracted me to the Z5 was the Nikkor 24-50mm f/4-6.3 zoom lens that you can get bundled with the camera. Both together will set you back $1,696.

1024-P9144353-Nikon-Z5.jpg

My thinking was that this tandem would be a good full frame option for hiking and travel. I put that theory to test with an 8-mile hike to Crystal Cove in South Lake Tahoe. Before I tell you how that went, let's take a closer look at the specs for this camera.

Features and Specs

  • 24.3MP CMOS sensor and EXPEED 6 processor afford wide sensitivity to ISO 51200, quick shooting at 4.5 fps.
  • Autofocus system with 273 selectable points, and is a hybrid focusing system that uses both phase-detection and contrast-detection methods
  • A large 3.2" 1.04m-dot LCD screen is available for bright, clear, and vivid image playback and live view shooting. The screen has a tilting design to suit working from high and low angles and it is also a touchscreen for more intuitive operation, navigation, and settings control.
  • A 3.69m-dot electronic finder is present for comfortable eye-level viewing.
  • Dual SD memory cards slots both support up to the UHS-II protocol for high-speed and efficient photo and video file saving.
  • Built-in to the body is a 5-axis sensor-shift Vibration Reduction (VR) mechanism that compensates for up to five stops of stabilization regardless of the lens in use. This system also works with adapted lenses, when using the optional FTZ Adapter, where 3-axis stabilization is used. Also, benefitting video recording, Electronic VR is available to help steady footage to suit handheld shooting.
  • the Z 5 supports UHD 4K video recording at up to 30 fps and Full HD recording at up to 60 fps, with the ability to save movie files to the in-camera memory cards or to an optional external recorder via HDMI out. UHD 4K recording uses a 1.7x crop of the center portion of the frame while Full HD recording uses the entire full frame. Additionally, in-camera time-lapse shooting is also possible with the ability to produce a finished UHD 4K video file directly from the camera.
  • USB charging as well as a dedicated battery charger in the box.
  • A robust magnesium alloy chassis is both dust- and weather-resistant to benefit working in harsh climates and inclement conditions.
  • Focus Shift mode automatically takes a series of up to 300 sequential images while advancing the focus position in each shot. These images can then be stacked into a single image with extended depth of field, making it ideal for close-up shooting of smaller objects as well as for landscapes and other still subjects.
  • What I Liked

    In use, there are many things that I like about the Z5. It feels great in the hands; really comfortable to shoot with. If you hand it to someone, they will likely remark that it feels lighter than it looks (1 lb, 4 oz). And I agree.

    The tilting LCD works very well, as does the EVF. The controls are intuitive and well placed, and the battery lasted the entire day.

    Image quality was excellent! I really liked both the Jpegs and the RAWs (processed in Lightroom CC). I was quite impressed with the 24-50mm Nikkor. It's a gem of a lens and about as compact as you can get for a full-frame zoom.

    Video was also quite good, and I appreciated having both mic and headphone jacks on the left side of the camera. The vibration reduction make handheld recording possible, which is something that I can't do with my Fujifilm X100V.

    A Few Complaints

    I do have my nits, however. The electronic level is quite invasive, in the center of the screen and not really useable for general photography. The camera is also slow to wake from sleep. So much so, that I ended up adjusting the sleep timer to 30 minutes and turning off the LCD. It was worth the tradeoff in battery life.

    Also, I was hoping for a built-in popup flash. I know real estate is at a premium in a mirrorless camera, but having to buy and carry an additional flash for a travel camera is a bit of a bummer.

    And finally, if you want to expand your lens collection beyond the 24-50mm zoom, the Nikon glass feels very expensive to me. I wrote about this in the Medium.com article titled, She's Great, but the Family's a Problem where I pointed out: "I felt a sinking feeling when meeting the Nikon lenses for the Z5. The first relative, a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, was $596 and not easy on the eyes. I know I'm not supposed to say these things, but it's true. The situation became even worse with the 35mm f/1.8 -- $846. That's expensive."

    The Bottom Line

    Unto itself, the Nikon Z5 with 24-50mm zoom is an attractive, robust mirrorless camera that delivers excellent image quality in a reasonably sized package. I certainly can recommend it for photographers already invested in the Z-Mount lens library. For those just starting out, however, your investment can balloon quickly to well over $3,000.

    The Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop

    I'm thrilled to announce the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on November 6-7, 2020.

    This event will be unlike others that you may have read about or even attended yourself. We are taking the popular components of the TDS physical workshops and digitizing them. Here are a few examples.

    • The Opportunity to Share Your Photos with Me and the Class - Even though the live event begins on Friday, Nov. 6, You will receive lesson tutorials on Oct. 21 and 28, then have time to go outside and practice these techniques. If you wish, you can share your favorite images from the practice sessions to be incorporated in the workshop.
    • Small Group for a More Personal Experience - Even though it's an online event, class size is limited to 15 to ensure you have ample opportunities to get your questions answered (by me and other class members).
    • Ongoing Conversations Beyond the Event Itself - I'm setting up a page online that will feature content from our event with the ability for ongoing conversations among class members.

    Even though I'm using the Eastern Sierra as a backdrop for my tutorials, your photography and contributions to this workshop could be from anywhere in the world. In other words, it's all about the photography, not the specific location.

    Since this is our first online event of this type, the tuition is only $150. Seats are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. Sign up today by visiting the Online Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop page at theNimblePhotographer.com.

    Why These Top Pros are Sticking with Olympus

    You can read the entire article on AmateurPhotographer.co.uk

    Since Olympus announced it was selling its camera division, some owners are questioning whether to stay with the brand. We asked leading Olympus users why they chose the brand and whether they have any plans to change. Here's what they said:

    From there, 11 top pros talk about their favorite Olympus gear and why they have no plans to switch. It's a great read.

    New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

    Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

    Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

    In this online course, Derrick will show you:

    • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
    • How to wire up and configure your kit.
    • Where to find records and what to look for.
    • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
    • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
    • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

    Updates and Such

    Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! You're eligible for a $25 discount to our online Eastern Sierra Workshop. Visit our Patreon page now for all the details.

    How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

    B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

    Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

    And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

    See you next week!

    Product Links and Comments

    There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

    You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #755, Sept. 8, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Years with a Photo Diary." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Back in 2015, when I began my photo diary, the world was a much different place. I didn't know it at the time, but over the next few years, I would experience monumental changes in both my personal and professional lives. Many of those changes have been captured in pictures and words. Today, I'll share a few of those entries, and discuss the value of creating your own photo diary.

5 Years with a Photo Diary

One of the interesting things about a dairy of any type is that you can measure how quickly life changes. Not just your perceptions, but with actual dates and events. Here are a few examples.

photo-diary.jpg

  • Aug. 16, 2016 - Giants Baseball - I packed the Contax 139Q for some street shooting in SF on our walk to AT&T Park for a Giants game. Four of us were going to the game: Zach, Max, Jason, and myself. We took the Larkspur Ferry over to the Embarcadero, strolled for 1 mile to the ballpark, then returned to Larkspur on the Giants Ferry after the game.
  • Dec. 27, 2016 - Apple Photos Book at Barnes & Noble - I was killing some time downtown waiting for the battery to be replaced in my iPhone 6S. So I ducked into our local Barnes and Noble bookstore to see if my The Apple Photos Book for Photographers was in stock. Much to my delight, there was one copy left. So I did what any photographer would do: I faced it forward and took a picture.
  • Jan. 31, 2017 - Ron and Lynn Story - Dad was recovering from his broken hip (and many other things) at Claremont Manor. On the last day of my January visit, I posed them together for this classic portrait. They are both in their 80s. [Note, this is the last photo of my dad that I took.]
  • March 10, 2017 - A celebration of Ron's Life: When my dad passed away near midnight on Monday, March 6, 2017, my family gathered at my sister's house in Huntington Beach California, and at my mother's home in Upland California. The first few days were just taking care of the many, many details that need to be addressed after such an event. Then on Friday, March 10, we had a gathering of family at Dalene's to celebrate Ron's life. This roll of film is from that event.
  • Oct. 19, 2017 - Steve and His 2 Hearts: I was able to take my first bike ride today since the firestorm. The breeze was coming from the west in the air-quality was quite good.
    I packed my camera and rode around the neighborhood. Photographing little things that will help me remember how horrible last week was.
    At one point, I met Steve. He had crafted these two hearts and wanted to post them somewhere to make people feel a little better.
    "I wanted to create a message without words," he told me. I talked with him for a bit more, felt a little better about things, then rode off to complete my errands. Steve had accomplished his goal.

Over the 5 years, I have 920 photo entries. And the more I look at the diary, the more I wish I had added more moments.So I'm going to rededicate myself to this project. After all, now the rebuilding begins, and I don't want to miss any of that!

Using Day One as a Photo Diary

In this spot, I talk about why I use Day One to record the entries for my photo Diary.

Panasonic unveils new 24, 35, 50 and 85mm F1.8 L-mount primes

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

The S5 is at the center of the Panasonic's announcements today, but the company has also revealed plans to release a handful of F1.8 prime lenses. Details are thin at the moment, but we know that S-series 24mm, 35mm, 50mm and 85mm F1.8 lenses are on the way, and that the 85mm will be available in November.

A YouTube presentation by Panasonic shows all four primes as being the same size, each of them smaller (and presumably less expensive) than the existing F1.4 L-mount options at these focal lengths, which will bring some added variety to the growing lens system.

New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

In this online course, Derrick will show you:

  • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
  • How to wire up and configure your kit.
  • Where to find records and what to look for.
  • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
  • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
  • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #754, Sept. 1, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Practically every camera on the market today captures video in addition to still pictures. Yay! But capture is not the roadblock for most photographers turned movie makers; it's the editing that slows them down. I can help with that. Today, I'll show you five different apps that make it easy to trim up your clips and share them with the world. And the best part, you probably already have the software on your computer. I hope you enjoy the show.

5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera

The number one need in the world of amateur video is trimming. If you could easily clean up the beginning of the clip and the end, you've fought half the battle.

QuickTime-Player.jpg

Adding a title or two is another very common request. And then exporting the footage in a format that will work on social is darn important as well.

For these tasks, you don't need to invest in high end video editing software. In fact, you probably have apps on your computer right now that can meet your basic needs. So let's take a look at them and see if any are right for you.

  • QuickTime for Mac - QuickTime Player lets you trim movies, stitch clips together, and move them around once they're on the timeline. Once you've finished your editing, you can export the new file or share it to YouTube and social networks. It's really quite incredible.
  • Photos for Windows and Photos for Mac - There's a nifty video editor inside Photos for Windows 10 that allows you to split and trim clips. So you can do quite a bit of editing once you get the hang of it. Photos for macOS enables trimming of video clips, and then you can stitch them together by creating a Slideshow. You can also create and add graphics there. Here's a good article on editing video using Photos for Windows 10.
  • Photos for iOS on iPad - Funny enough, the iPad is a more powerful machine for editing videos using Photos than the Mac itself. On the tablet you can not only trim, but add filters, adjust colors, tweak exposure, crop, and even add a vignette. Since the iPad and Mac are connected via iCloud, you could use them as a tandem. Edit the clips on the iPad, then stitch them together using Slideshow on the Mac.
  • Lightroom Classic for Mac and Windows: The Classic version is quite good at video editing. You can trim, adjust tone and color, and even play with clips. Check out this excellent tutorial for using Lightroom with movies.
  • iMovie for macOS and iOS: If you haven't looked at iMovie in a while, you should revisit it. Not only is it excellent for editing your videos, you can create trailers and other fun projects. Take a look at trailer I created for the How to Get Started with Vinyl Records online course.

As your comfort level increases, you can push into more sophisticated apps such as Final Cut. But for basic work, it's amazing you can do with software that you probably already own.

Sony to Debut a New Line of 'Compact' Full-Frame Cameras Starting this Month: Report

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.

Sony might have some interesting gear in the works. According to the latest rumors, the company is planning to debut a new line-up of "super-compact" full-frame a7 and a9 cameras aimed at vlogging and travel. And the first one, dubbed the "Sony a7C", will arrive this month.

According to Sony Alpha Rumors, two reliable sources have "confirmed" speculation that Sony is planning to release a new entry-level full-frame camera this month... but they actually said a lot more than that. Apparently, the camera will be part of a new line of super-compact "C" cameras that will live alongside the regular a7 and a9 series.

The first to arrive will be the Sony a7C--an entry-level model, on par with the Sony a7 III--but other "C" cameras are rumored to follow, creating a whole line of compact cameras aimed at vloggers and travel shooters who prioritize portability and features like a flip screen.

The first camera, the so-called Sony a7C, is rumored to arrive sometime in "mid-September" as a sort of hybrid between a Sony a7 III and the a6600. According to SAR, the camera will combine the body of an a6600 with the sensor and performance of the a7 III, the fully-articulating screen of the a7S III, and a pop-up EVF like we've seen on several of the RX100 cameras.

Other specs include a single SD card slot, USB Type-C, both a mic and a headphone jack, and built-in WiFi and Bluetooth. All of this for a little more than $2,000 MSRP at launch. Finally, the "C" line of cameras will allegedly be released alongside a new line of compact lenses to match.

New Release: "How to Get Started with Vinyl Records"

Take a hands-on journey with Derrick Story as he shows you how to set up a HiFi stereo system, add vinyl records to your music library, care for them, and finally, how to digitize the albums for personal listening.

Everything that you need to know to get started with records, or to rekindle your love for vinyl LPs. Plus, you'll get 30-percent discount codes for digitizing software from Rogue Amoeba. The money you will save is more than you'll spend for the price of this online course. What a great value!

In this online course, Derrick will show you:

  • All of the gear that you need to set up a HiFi system.
  • How to wire up and configure your kit.
  • Where to find records and what to look for.
  • How to take care of your vinyl so that it lasts a lifetime.
  • How to digitize your albums and add them to your digital music catalog.
  • Tips and tricks to enhance your enjoyment.

You can learn more and purchase the course here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #753, August 25, 2020. Today's theme is "A RAW Look at Image Differences Between Smartphones and Cameras." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As a guy who loves to shoot with both his iPhone and digital cameras, I wondered how much of a difference there is between the two when I shoot in RAW. The smartphone certainly holds its own when it comes to Jpegs. Is it equally competitive with RAW files? So I conducted a test and compared an iPhone X with an Fujifilm X100V. And I share my findings in today's TDS photography podcast.

A RAW Look at Image Differences Between Smartphones and Cameras

RAW File Comparison Left: Fujifilm X100V - Right: iPhone X - Rendered in Capture One Pro 20

I'm a bit surprised that I never set aside the time to do this test before. I enjoy photography with both my iPhone and my Olympus, Fujifilm Nikon, and Pentax cameras. I rarely shoot in RAW on the iPhone, but did so for this test since I capture in RAW on my other cameras. So I wanted a pears to pears comparison.

My subject was a bowl of pears from my yard photographed in natural light. As best I could, I maintained similar angles and avoided exposure compensation. I let the cameras do the work, using the RAW files from each.

To decode and view the images, I used Capture One Pro 20 and Lightroom CC. My cameras were an iPhone X and Fujifilm X100V. I did use camera and lens profiles when they were available, and I did add some warmth to these through white balance. But I let the apps do the rest of the processing using their respective auto enhancements.

BTW: As a point of reference, the DNGs from the iPhone were 12.1 MBs for a 12MP file vs the RAF files from the X100V that are 56.8 MBs for a 26MP image. That is a substantial difference.

After comparing the output, here's what I noticed.

Pears-Side-by-Side-LR.jpg Left: Fujifilm X100V - Right: iPhone X - Rendered in Adobe Lightroom

  • Smartphones continue to impress - There are differences between the two files, which I will note, but overall I wanted to state that the DNGs from the iPhone are quite respectable, especially in terms of detail. Can I tell the difference? Yes I can. But it's much closer than one might initially think.
  • Depth of Field - This isn't a RAW thing so much, but boy is it noticeable. Even when I stopped down to f/5.6 on the X100V, the falloff is so much more pleasing that shooting at f/2.4 on the iPhone, which renders everything sharp.
  • Color Science - The color difference was very noticeable to me. The iPhone had a much harder time rendering subtle hue difference. This was particularly noticeable on the backside of the pear in the upper left corner. There is this wonderful peachy coloring in the Fuji shot, but in all of the iPhone images that area went brown, as if the gamut was narrower for the iPhone. Also, and this will sound funny, the fruit looked much more edible with the Fuji shots compared to the iPhone rendering.
  • Sharpness: Both images are sharp, but the characteristics are much different. The textures on the iPhone pears are more pronounced, almost exaggerated, compared to the more delicate rendering from the X100V. Again, I'm not sure that I would want to eat the fruit in the iPhone shot.
  • Shadows and Highlights: Again, an admirable rendering by the iPhone. The shadows were good with decent gradation. But the shadows from the X100V were more pleasing, and the highlights were brighter, but still retained detail. The iPhone highlights were more controlled with less contrast. I feel the X100V shot has more life.

If I didn't have the X100V RAW files in the same album as the iPhone images, I would say that the iPhone RAWs were very good. And to be honest, they are. But when you compare the two side by side, little differences become quite noticeable.

And I think that is how I would sum up the comparison. If little differences in color science, tonality, and texture are important to you, it's still very worth it to carry a digital camera for the images that you want to draw the most out of in post.

The gulf becomes even wider when it comes to background control. And for a lot of photographers, the conversation would end right there.

Panasonic will announce, via livestream, its new Lumix S5 full-frame camera on September 2

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Panasonic has announced it will hold an online launch event for its new full-frame mirrorless camera, the Lumix S5, on Wednesday, September 2, 2020, at 10 AM EDT.

Aside from the date and time, no further information was shared about the camera or launch event. Panasonic suggests keeping an eye on its Lumix S5 webpage and Instagram account, but we will also update this article with a link to the event when it goes live.

Rumor has it, however, that the S5 will be more compact and affordable than existing options from Panasonic. According to Digital Camera World, "the Panasonic S5 will be one-third smaller and lighter than the S1, has a 24.2MP sensor, 4K, Dual Native ISO, and will cost $1,998. Those specs are pretty compelling. We'll find out for sure soon enough.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

My Expansion into Music and Audio

With two new music titles about to release: "Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs" and "Enjoying and Digitizing Vinyl Records," you may be wondering how these topics fit with the traditional content on TheDigitalStory that is primarily image based.

The answer is: Quite Well!

Audio has always been a part of our world here. This is a podcast for heaven's sakes! And as I look at our changing world and how we might be adapting to it, I see music being a big part of the formula that helps us stay happy and creative.

Plus, one of the side effects to the popularity of digital music is that we're listening more and more on small devices with earbuds and bluetooth speakers. There's no denying that this is highly convenient, but if you play the same music on via a CD or record album on a HiFi stereo, it will sound different. And at times, very different.

From my perspective, this is no more a campaign against digital downloads for music than it is for smartphone photography. They are both here to stay, and I like 'em! But, if we're limited to smartphones for photography and audio, then we are missing a lot. And I want to advocate for richer experiences on both fronts to augment the digital convenience we tend to rely on.

If this resonates with you at all, then please take a look at these two titles that will appear on TheNimblePhotographer site later this week. I'm loving rediscovering music on this level, and I'm hoping that you may as well.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #752, August 18, 2020. Today's theme is "5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Much is written about the evils of gear acquisition syndrome, often referred to as GAS. And yes, it is a real thing for many photographers. But my personal view of this affliction is isolated more to spending big bucks on cameras and glass. What about those smaller purchases that bring us true joy and energize our enthusiasm for photography? I'll make my anti-GAS case on today's TDS podcast.

5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life

I don't know if you've ever done this, but I'm going to admit to you that I have. Have you ever set a new camera, or an accessory for it, on the table in front of you while you worked?

PEN-F-1024.jpeg

It wasn't in use. There was no particular reason to do this other than you just wanted to look at it and admire its beauty. I've done that. I did it with the Olympus PEN-F in its handsome leather half case. I also perched the Fujifilm X100V with its aluminum grip in front of me. It's such a great feeling. I can't wait to go out and take pictures with these beauties.

So when we're feeling a bit stale, how can we spark that joy without dinging our credit cards with a $1,500 charge? My trick has been through new accessories and techniques. And I have five to share with you this week.

  • A New Lens, but Vintage - Yes, you could spend $1,200 on a new state of the art optic. But scoring a vintage beauty for $100 can be just as satisfying and evokes far less guilt. And the images that this glass produces can be truly inspiring.
  • An ND Filter - Unless you're a seasoned landscape photographer, you probably haven't invested in an ND filter yet. Get one and find some water and amaze yourself with the images you can produce. I also recommend a smartphone app that will help you calculate exposure. There are many of them. This will increase your success rate as well as your enjoyment quotient. You can check a a variety of ND filters here.
  • A Pack of Black 5x7 Frames - There's something about a museum-styled black frame that makes your images look just a bit better. 5x7 prints are easy to make. Put the two together and you will be truly pleased with the results. Try it. I'm beggin' ya! Here's a a set of frames that I bought and have been pleased with
  • Half Case or Aluminum Grip, You Choose: I've gone both routes and can't decide which one I like better. On the PEN-F I went with a leather half case with matching wrist strap. For the X100V I chose the aircraft aluminum grip with Arca Swiss adapter on the bottom. I can't stop looking at either one of them. Here is a selection of half cases to browse.
  • Custom Lens Hood: I've gone this route three times and have not regretted my decision once. I first bought the Olympus metal hood for my 75mm f/1.8 optic. What a beautiful, artfully designed metal accessory. I did it again with the Voigtlander 40mm f/2.0 optic for my Nikons. It included a fitted lens cap that is gorgeous. And finally, my silver Olympus 17mm f/1.8 lens has a limited edition metal lens hood with custom fitted cap. Oh my. All three are so irresistible.

I realize that when it comes to photography, I am easily entertained. And these minor indulgences really keep my enthusiasm waxing. Pick one or two and try them yourself. And if you have a favorite that isn't on this list, please list it on our TDS Facebook pages so others may consider it for their kits.

Adobe opens up free registration for its all-digital Adobe MAX 2020 conference?

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Registration for the all-digital Adobe MAX 2020 event is now open and free for all.

Back in May, Adobe announced both of its annual conferences, 99U and Adobe MAX, would be going all-digital amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Now, Adobe has opened up registration for its Adobe MAX 2020 conference, making it free for all who want to join the virtual version of 'The Creativity Conference.'

The online event will feature more than 250 speakers and take place from October 19-21. Both the main keynote and the breakout sessions will be available for all registrants. The headlining speakers include photographer Annie Leibovitz; recording artist, producer and director Tyler, the Creator; writer, director and producer Ava DuVernay; and actor and director Keanu Reeves. Dozens of other artists across all disciplines will have keynotes and breakout sessions as well.

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "The Body Is Willing Long After the Mind is Gone," "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

After mentioning this last week, I was thrilled so see that many of you from our TDS audience were hanging out on Medium last week. Thank you so much for chiming in. I think this is going to be an excellent complement to the work we're doing on TDS.

Those Darn Meteors!

Actually, the meteors weren't the problem. But those clouds certainly were. I wandered out two nights last week with camera on tripod and ended going home with my tail between my legs. I explain what happened in this segment of the show.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #751, August 11, 2020. Today's theme is "Has the Pandemic Killed Your Creative Mojo?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

In the last two months, I've shot 2 rolls of film. And if it wasn't for Comet Neowise, the same would apply to my digital production as well. It's not that I don't want to take pictures. It's that all of my normal prompts have been put on ice. And now I'm searching for new inspiration to increase my production. I talk about this ongoing challenge, and the realization I had about it, in this week's TDS podcast.

Has the Pandemic Killed Your Creative Mojo?

Derrick-1024.jpeg

When I was 15 years old, I had a job at a gas station in my home town. I learned a lot about myself during that time. For example, there would be stretches of time with no customers. The slower traffic was, the slower I became to the point where I didn't feel like doing anything.

Then I would get a rush of cars, and I would work like crazy and feel totally energized. Time would pass quickly, and I really enjoyed my work.

The thing I've noticed about all versions of shelter in place, including those that have cancelled all of my photo jobs and workshops, is that it's a momentum killer. I become focused on making ends meet, trying to cut costs, stay in contact with friends, and in all honesty, just get through the day as safely as possible.

None of this seems good for creativity. And the more that I'm stuck inside my studio, the less motivated I am to venture out to take pictures of the world coping with a pandemic. Maybe that's it. We're just so single topic these days, the topic itself feels old and tired.

So I devised a plan to battle back and to combat the gas station blues. Here's what this week's strategy looks like.

  • Monday: Ride my bike to Jeremiah's to pick up some processed film and look for pictures along the way. Write and record the podcast. I didn't get any pictures, but I did have an epiphany.
  • Tuesday: Start recording my new training title on "How to Play, Digitize, and Enjoy Vinyl Records". Prepare for and watch the Perseid (Per - See - id) meteor shower that night.
  • Wednesday: Continue recording my new training title How to Play, Digitize, and Enjoy Vinyl Records. Process the images that I captured the night before. Make sure one walk or bike ride.
  • Thursday: Another day of recording my new training title on Enjoying and Digitizing Vinyl Records. Be sure to get in a long walk or a bike ride.
  • Friday: Mini road trip for a meeting, but pack camera and spend a little extra time taking pictures before returning home. Try to find a photo subject that isn't COVID.

What I've discovered is that these activities do help me feel better. And that's definitely half the battle. But I'm still not feeling as creatively powerful as I would like. I think part of that is because I'm using a lot of my creative juices to problem solve the challenges in business and life. I should give myself credit for that. (And you should as well.)

And that's when the lightbulb finally went on for me. It's not that we've lost our creativity. It's that we're having to use it for other things, namely problem solving during a pandemic. The pandemic didn't kill our mojo. It redirected it. And it will be stronger than ever when we get to tap it again for our photography, writing, painting, and music.

So for right now, just do the best you can every day. Meet those challenges head on. Give yourself credit for using your problem solving capabilities to help your friends, family, community, and country.

And continue to check in here. Because if anyone knows what you're going through, it's us.

Can You Tell the Difference Between Digital B&W and Film?

A common remark I hear from photographers is that there's no need to shoot B&W film because it's so easy to convert digital files to monochrome. Why take on the extra work?

Generally speaking, I think that's a fair comment. We can make very, very nice B&W images on our computers choosing from a variety of tools and film simulations. And yet, film is still a bit different. Maybe it's the randomness of the silver crystals compared to organized patten of pixels, maybe it's something else.

So I thought we'd have a little fun with this. Here are two images. Both shot with a Nikon and a 50mm f/1.8 lens. One is digital, and the other is Tri-X film that I processed at the studio and scanned on a $160 Kodak Scanza. Which one is the digital, and which one is from Tri-X?

And the answer is: Photo A is digital captured with a Nikon D700 and Nikon 50mm f/1.8 lens. Photo B is analog, recorded with a Nikon FA with a 50mm lens and Tri-X film.

As of this morning, the correct answer was leading 3:1 on our Inner Circle site and Facebook page combined.

Using the NPF Rule for Photographing Night Skies

You can read the entire article here on F-Stoppers.

Because we know the amount of rotation in 24 hours, we can easily calculate the distance a star will move each second. This leads to the Rule of 600. By dividing the number 600 by the focal length of the lens you are using, you will end up with the maximum amount of seconds an exposure may last. That's easy to remember, and easy to use.

The Rule of 600 originates from the days of analogue photography. That is why the focal length has to be a 35mm equivalent. If you are using a crop sensor, just multiply the focal length by the crop factor. Still, not every image with a shutter speed that is calculated by the Rule of 600, will produce real stars. There is something not right with this rule.

Nowadays, our digital sensors have more resolution than analogue film. It means, motion blur will be visible much sooner compared to analogue film. That is why the Rule of 600 is often changed into the Rule of 500, or even the Rule of 400. It compensates the increased resolution up to a certain point. Still, it is not easy to get the exact maximum shutter speed. Especially because the resolution of digital sensors is getting larger with almost every new camera. That is why you have to take resolution into account, and for that you can use the NPF rule.

The NPF rule originates from Fr�d�ric Michaud from the Soci�t� Astron�mique du Havre. It is a complex rule that takes sensor resolution into account. The NPF stands for

N = aperture (it's the official notification of aperture in optics),
P = pixel density, the distance between the pixels on the sensor, also called pixel pitch,
F = focal length.

The app PhotoPills will calculate the NPF rule for you.

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

After mentioning this last week, I was thrilled so see that many of you from our TDS audience were hanging out on Medium last week. Thank you so much for chiming in. I think this is going to be an excellent complement to the work we're doing on TDS.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #750, August 4, 2020. Today's theme is "Just Announced: The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

For those who thought Olympus was done for the year after the JIP announcement, I have a surprise for you: New camera and new super telephoto lens. Today, we're going to take a close look at the OM-D E-M10 Mark IV and the Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens. Plus, I'll give an update to the Eastern Sierra workshop in the Fall and Costa Rica in January. I hope you enjoy the show.

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV

E-M10_top.jpg

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV is lighter than any previous model, at approximately 0.85 pounds. Even when paired with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ lens, the kit is just over a pound, making it incredibly portable. A deep grip provides an ergonomic, comfortable and secure feel. Easy USB charging enables in-camera charging. So you can use a power bank when on the go. This body is also wireless radio wave external flash compatible.

A first for the OM-D series, this model is equipped with a flip-down LCD monitor and dedicated selfie mode, making it easy and fun to take high-quality selfies using one hand. The camera supports high-angle and low-angle shooting, so photos and videos turn out exactly as imagined. Additionally, the OM-D E-M10 Mark IV features a high-definition electronic viewfinder, making it easier than ever to shoot in direct sunlight and in other situations where it might be difficult to view the LCD monitor.

E-M10-front.jpg

Feature Highlights

  • 20.3 million 4/3" Live MOS Sensor
  • 121-point contrast AF - All target, group target (9-area), single target
  • Built-in 5-axis sensor-shift image stabilization for video and still photos (compensates for yaw, pitch, roll, vertical shift, horizontal shift) - up to 4.5 stops
  • Sequential shooting up to 8.7 fps
  • Eye-level electronic viewfinder, approx. 2.36M dots
  • 3.0-inch tilting monitor -Approx.1040k dots (3:2), electrostatic capacitance touch panel
  • Digital ESP metering (324-area multi pattern metering), center-weighted average metering, spot metering, spot metering with highlight control, spot metering with shadow control
  • AUTO ISO (default) : LOW (approx.100) ‐ 6400 Manual ISO : LOW (approx.100), 200 - 25600
  • Built-In Flash with wireless capability, Triggered and controlled by the built-in flash (Olympus Wireless RC Flash system compatible)
  • SD Card Slot - SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS-I, UHS-II)
  • 4K Video - 3840 × 2160 (4K) / 30p, 25p, 24p / IPB (approx. 102 Mbps)
  • External mic can be attached, but not sure how (USB Micro-B?)
  • BLS-50 Li-ion battery (included)

E-M10-back.jpg

Pricing, Configurations, and Availability

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV Body (Silver/Black); $699 (U.S.)/$999.99 (CAD)

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV EZ Kit Body (Silver/Black) and M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm F3.5- 5.6 EZiv lens; $799 (U.S.)/$1,049.99 (CAD)

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV will be available for pre-order at participating local authorized retailers, or at www.getolympus.com, and will begin shipping on September 25, 2020. For detailed product specifications visit https://www.getolympus.com/digitalcameras/omd/e-m10-mark-iv.html.

Take advantage of a special launch offer by purchasing a new OM-D E-M10 Mark IV before November 1, 2020; receive an Olympus starter kit, including an Olympus camera bag, extra BLS- 50 battery and 32GB SD card (starter kit valued at $99.99).

October Eastern Sierra Physical Photography Workshop Postponed

Based on the progress of the pandemic and the need to keep our community members safe, I'm postponing the Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop to 2021.

I do have an event, however, that I'm hoping you'll be interested in: The Nimble Landscape Virtual Workshop Experience. Derrick then explains how this new event will work.

The Olympus 100-400mm F5.0-6.3 IS Lens

The 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS is an ultra-compact, lightweight super-telephoto zoom lens that covers a broad telephoto focal length of 200-800mm equivalent1 and is compliant with the Micro Four Thirds System standard.

100-400mm.jpg

The optic features the same dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO lens series, and when paired with the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, delivers up to 1600mm equivalent1 super telephoto shooting. This lens offers superior autofocus performance, even handheld, and in-lens image stabilization for the optimal shooting experience.

Despite being a 200-800mm equivalent super telephoto zoom lens, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is compact and lightweight, with a length of 205.7 mm, a weight of 1,120 g6 and a filter diameter of 72 mm.

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is capable of 200-800mm equivalent1 telephoto shooting on its own, which can be further extended when paired with the optional (sold separately) M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14 or the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, for up to 1600mm equivalent , making it possible to zoom in close on subjects that are difficult to approach, such as birds and wildlife, and delivering flattening effects for shooting that is unique to a super telephoto lens.

A rear focus system is employed to drive this lightweight focusing lens, for fast, high-precision autofocus performance. This lens is also equipped with four functional switches, designed to support handheld shooting, including a Focus Limiter switch for AF operation selection, ranging between three levels, according to the focusing distance, allowing for quick focusing and comfortable shooting, even in the super telephoto range. In-lens image stabilization on/off delivers stable handheld super telephoto shooting, an AF/MF switch and a zoom locking switch.

Pricing and Availability

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400 f5.0-6.3 IS lens will be available for $1,499 (U.S.)/$2,199.99 (CAD). To pre-order, visit a participating local authorized retailer, or www.getolympus.com. Shipping will begin September 8, 2020. Please visit the website for detailed product specifications: https://www.getolympus.com/lenses/m-zuiko-digital-ed-100- 400mm-f5-0-6-3-is.html.

bonus-kit.jpg

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

After mentioning this last week, I was thrilled so see that many of you from our TDS audience were hanging out on Medium last week. Thank you so much for chiming in. I think this is going to be an excellent complement to the work we're doing on TDS.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #749, July 28, 2020. Today's theme is "Resting on Your Laurels Can Hurt You - AP Switches to Sony." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Prior to the mirrorless revolution, Canon had the camera industry pinned to the mat. I remember attending an invite-only press event at PMA back in the day, and marveling at their confidence and swagger. And for good reason, they were dominate. But soon after, serious photography began to evolve away from the DSLR, and Canon was slow to innovate. And just last week, the Associated Press announced they were switching to Sony for all of their photography and video work. Today's top story on the TDS Photography Podcast.

Resting on Your Laurels Can Hurt You - AP Switches to Sony.

Change has been in the air for quite some time. A few months ago I read a story where at an important hearing DSLRs were deemed too noisy, and were allowed to shoot only at specific times. Silent mirrorless photographers could capture at will.

Since many of us are mirrorless shooters, we can imagine the benefits of these cameras over DSLRs during the daily grind of reporting. Mirrorless are lighter, more agile, and definitely quieter. If you had to carry a bag all day, every day, what would you choose?

sony-a7r4-top.jpg

Meanwhile, Sony continued to add necessary pieces to complete the professional photographer puzzle. They launched their professional service, they put long, wide aperture telephoto lenses in the roadmap, and they carefully integrated stills and video into the same camera system.

Then a week ago, the other shoe dropped: the Associated Press (AP) officially announced their switch to the Sony Alpha system. "With hundreds of staff photographers and videographers around the world, and thousands of freelancers who contribute, the AP is a massive and trusted source that covers both the expected and unexpected." Here's what they had to say about it.

The following interview quotes are from the story, 'We're confident that they can deliver': We talk to AP's Director of Photography about switch to Sony on DP Review.

"We liked the idea of having the color quality and the image quality being close to the same between stills and video equipment. So if a stills photographer helped out a video colleague with a little filming, or B-roll, it would fit in the edit. And if we were to pull a frame grab from a 4K video camera it would have the same basic feel as a photograph from a stills camera."

"And the lens mounts are the same, so if a videographer was working with a stills photographer, he or she could borrow a 600mm f4, or a stills photographer could try a cine lens to get a certain look. It just gives us some unique opportunities."

"The vast majority of the stills photographers will get a9 Mark IIs. We will get some a7R IVs for the videographers, and a couple for some of our entertainment shooters who do a lot of portraits. But the standard kit will be an a9 Mark II."

"On the video side there are six different cameras that might become part of the kit, from broadcast cine cameras all the way down to small palm-sized cameras, depending on the assignment. But we have six cameras spec'd-out on the video side."

Next, here are some quotes from the article, Why The Associated Press Just Switched To Sony on alphauniverse.com.

"We're excited to switch to this new technology partly because it can operate quietly, which makes it easy for us to go places that before the noise of a shutter might be distracting. Now we can go places and tell stories from different perspectives that we couldn't before. We also like the fact that what you see is what you get in the viewfinder. So if your color balance is off or your exposure is off, it is apparent immediately. We also like that it's lightweight." says David Ake, AP Director of Photography.

"For the very first time we'll have interchangeable lenses between some of our video cameras and some of our still photography cameras. That's extraordinary. We've yet to kind of really plot out what the effects of that will be to us at a year's time or two years time, but we know we're going to be able to work in a much more flexible, nimble way," says Derl McCrudden, Deputy Managing Editor.

I think there's also the sentiment that Sony is going to stay on the forefront of visual storytelling, and that investing in them will help AP stay at the top of their game as well.

Results from Our Listener Poll on the Near Future of Physical Workshops

We had an excellent turnout of 72 participants for last week's poll on physical workshops. Here's a summary of the results.

On the plus side, 27 (37 percent) respondents felt that a January workshop in Costa Rica was interesting to them and that they would consider it, at least from a pure health perspective. Fewer of those were optimistic about the feasibility of our planned event in October.

35 respondents (49 percent) ruled out the possibility of either workshop all together, based on the information that they have now. The availability of a vaccine is a major consideration for them.

10 respondents (14 percent) don't feel like there's enough information now to make a decision. I would say the odds of someone from this category signing up are slim.

This information is so valuable and has been a tremendous help to me. Along with other key elements, your comments will help direct us on a positive course moving forward.

In that spirit, I will announce my plans for the remainder of 2020, and the first half of 2021 on next week's TDS podcast. Included in that discussion will be both the October Eastern Sierra event, and my participation for Costa Rica in January.

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

After mentioning this last week, I was thrilled so see that many of you from our TDS audience were hanging out on Medium last week. Thank you so much for chiming in. I think this is going to be an excellent complement to the work we're doing on TDS.

Comet and Night Sky Images from TDS Members

The night sky has been a welcome relief for many of us. Fresh air, interesting subject material, challenging work, and no masks! Here are some of the excellent contributions from our TDS Public Group on Flickr (a great place for photography, BTW.) I've picked a few of my favorites.

Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs Now Available for Inner Circle Members

In this 40-minute video, I show you an easy way to incorporate audio compact discs into your current digital music library using iTunes/Apple Music for Mac or Windows.

You'll learn how to choose the best codec for your music, how to easily incorporate album artwork, and tips to keeping everything organized along the way.

It's available right now, for free, to TDS Inner Circle Members. And if you're not part of the Circle yet, you can sign up today and watch the movie right away. Just click on the Patreon tile that's on all the pages of The Digital Story.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! You can join our unofficial "Board of Directors" by visiting our Patreon page and signing up.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #748, July 21, 2020. Today's theme is "Time to Think About Workshops (or just too darn early)?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Back in March 2020 when we first sheltered-in-place, many hoped that we could put a lid on this pandemic. But now months later, we still find ourselves in the heat of battle. With two physical workshops remaining on the books, I decided to listen to what you think about upcoming events. And I hope you'll participate in our listener poll.

Time to Think About Workshops (or just too darn early)?

Outdoor workshops have advantages over indoor events. The fresh air circulating makes it far more reasonable to engage in photography, as long as physical distancing is respected.

P4284366.jpeg

But there are still travel logistics to be considered. And what do you do about meals and class sessions? Certainly a lot to consider.

I have two events on the books. The first is the Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on Oct. 1-3, 2020. The second event is the Costa Rica Creative Immersion Photography Workshop on January 10-17, 2021.

What I'd like to know is what is your opinion about the timing of each of these workshops. You can share your opinion by participating in the reader poll: Time to Start Thinking About Workshops? (for Patreon members). If you're not an Inner Circle Member, you can voice your opinion on our TDS Facebook page. Let your thoughts be heard, then I will recap the results in next week's show.

Review the TDS Show on Apple Podcasts

It's always helpful to have fresh reviews on Apple Podcasts. And a big thank you to those who reviewed our show on Apple Podcasts last week. I truly appreciate it.

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

Canon's 5D DSLR Line is Dead: Report

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.com

If you love the Canon 5D Mark IV DSLR and have been waiting for its successor to be announced, brace yourself for a big disappointment: Canon has reportedly decided to discontinue its popular and pioneering 5D line of cameras.

Canon was, as recently as October 2019, said to be working on the 5D Mark V for a release by the end of 2020. But with a big push toward mirrorless cameras and the industry struggling with the economic devastation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems that the camera has now been erased from Canon's roadmap.

Canon Rumors is hearing from a reliable source that there will not be a Canon 5D Mark V and that there will be no direct successor to the Canon 5D Mark IV.

The original Canon 5D was announced in 2005 and was the first full-frame DSLR with a standard DSLR size (as opposed to the double-grip form factor of the 1D line). In 2008, Canon announced the Canon 5D Mark II, which made a huge splash as the first Canon EOS camera to offer video recording capabilities.

Pentax doubles down on DSLRs: "there is simply no substitute"

You can read the entire article on DigitalCameraWorld.com.

On social media, Pentax has been teasing a statement about its future. Now the manufacturer has revealed its statement, and it is simple: "Pentax believes in the future of SLR photography".

It is the latest in a long line of messages from the company, eschewing a mirrorless future in favor of DSLRs. A strategy that seems increasingly questionable, in a world where every other major manufacturer has put its eggs in the mirrorless basket.

The company launched a microsite dedicated to extolling the virtues of SLR cameras and, specifically, the optical viewfinder - which Pentax is positioning as the key USP of its entire product line.

"Pentax is committed to the future of SLR photography through the continued development of camera technology," states the strange new site. And the pro-SLR, anti-mirrorless sentiment is echoed in an accompanying new promotional video.

"It's such a joy to use an SLR, that there is simply no substitute for this style of shooting."

Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs Now Available for Inner Circle Members

In this 40-minute video, I show you an easy way to incorporate audio compact discs into your current digital music library using iTunes/Apple Music for Mac or Windows.

You'll learn how to choose the best codec for your music, how to easily incorporate album artwork, and tips to keeping everything organized along the way.

It's available right now, for free, to TDS Inner Circle Members. And if you're not part of the Circle yet, you can sign up today and watch the movie right away. Just click on the Patreon tile that's on all the pages of The Digital Story.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #747, July 14, 2020. Today's theme is "Comets, Night Sky, and More." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

What a great time to be outside, under the stars. If you're in North America, Jupiter and Saturn are both visible, the Milky Way is out, and as a bonus, Comet Neowise is now hanging out in the North right after sunset. So grab your binoculars, pack your camera, and let's have some fun. You don't even have to wear a mask.

Comets, Night Sky, and More

So I'm heading out first on Tuesday night, and again on Wednesday if weather conditions remain clear. I'll need a good view of the North because Comet Neowise will only be between 5 and 10 degrees above the horizon at that time. But I'll also take a look at the Milky Way, and of course enjoy the visible planets as well.

Thank goodness for this opportunity. The timing couldn't be better. Between the nice summer weather and the stir-craziness that comes with Shelter in Place, a little night photography to shake things up sounds perfect.

If you want to head out as well, here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare.

cometron-1024.jpeg

Don't Forget Your Night Sky Binoculars

Even if your main objective is to take pictures, a pair of night sky binoculars is handy for surveying the sky and enjoying the show.

Get a Good Astronomy App

Loading an app such as Stellarium on your iPhone or iPad will make it easy to locate the comet in the night sky. You can plan ahead of time with it by entering location and time to figure out the best viewing of Neowise, or anything else for that matter, then use it in the field in realtime.

Pack Your Camera Kit

I'm using my Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II with the Olympus PRO 40-150mm f/2.8 zoom. I'm going to bring my tripod as well.

As for exposure, I don't want star trails, so I'm going to use the 500 Rule to help me determine the maximum shutter speed (500 divided by the true focal length of the lens). So, for example, with my lens set at 40 mm, the math would work like this; 500 / 80 = 6.25 seconds. Therefore the maximum shutter speed I can use before the stars start to blur is 6 seconds. As for ISO, I'm going to start with 1600 and adjust as necessary. My aperture will be set to f/2.8. I'm going to test with noise reduction on and off. (It does double the amount of processing.)

Bring Flashlight with a Red Filter

A flashlight with a red filter will help you keep your night vision and make it easier to see objects in the sky.

Finding a Good Location

For comet shots in particular, I like a good scene to complement the night sky. This is probably the hardest part of the assignment for me.

Once you find the location, make sure you can be comfortable while you're there. I always bring my camp chairs and a blanket.

Sony a7S III, Canon R5 and R6

There is so much happening in the full frame world right now with the formal announcement of the Canon R5 and R6, and the anticipated unveiling of the Sony a7S III.

It's a pretty high stakes game. The Canon R5 with RF 24-105mm f/4L lens will cost $4,999. That gets you 45MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, 8K30 Raw and 4K120 10-Bit Internal Video, and Sensor-Shift 5-Axis Image Stabilization.

The Canon R6 with RF 24-105mm f/4L lens will cost $3,599. That gets you 20MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, 4K60 and FHD 120 10-Bit Internal Video, and Sensor-Shift 5-Axis Image Stabilization.

The RF line of lenses has really been impressing reviewers, so this package looks very strong on paper. Preorders have been brisk to say the least.

We'll see how the Sony stacks up once it is officially announced. But there's a lot of heat in the kitchen right now for full frame cameras.

Review the TDS Show on Apple Podcasts

It's always helpful to have fresh reviews on Apple Podcasts. If you haven't reviewed our show there, please consider taking a few minutes to do so. I truly appreciate it!

Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs Now Available for Inner Circle Members

In this 40-minute video, I show you an easy way to incorporate audio compact discs into your current digital music library using iTunes/Apple Music for Mac or Windows.

You'll learn how to choose the best codec for your music, how to easily incorporate album artwork, and tips to keeping everything organized along the way.

It's available right now, for free, to TDS Inner Circle Members. And if you're not part of the Circle yet, you can sign up today and watch the movie right away. Just click on the Patreon tile that's on all the pages of The Digital Story.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.