January 2024 Archives

This is The Digital Story Podcast #932, Jan. 30, 2024. Today's theme is "A First Look at the OM System OM-1 Mark II." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Just in case you were wondering, OM System is not sitting on its laurels with the OM-1 that was released in March 2022. They've followed up their compact marvel with the Mark II. And on today's podcast, I'm going to tell you all about its feature highlights and who I think this camera is for. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 932

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A First Look at the OM System OM-1 Mark II

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When you first look at the OM-1 Mark II, you will notice two things. First, the crown badge now reads OM System and not Olympus. The second, practically nothing else has changed on the outside. And if you're an OM-1 owner, that's a good thing because all of your accessories will work on the Mark II, including the external battery grip.

But underneath the hood there are upgrades and an intriguing new feature. Before we get to that, let's take a look at the spec highlights.

  • 5-axis image stabilization with up to 8.5 shutter speed steps compensation.
  • Eye-level OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 5.76M dots.
  • 3-inch vari-angle monitor (electrostatic capacitance touch panel), approx. 1.62M dots.
  • Dust and splash-proof (IP53 rated).
  • High-speed cross-type phase-detection AF (1,053 points).
  • High-speed contrast AF (1,053 points).
  • AI Detection AF - computational photography for identifying a variety of subjects.
  • Silent Sequential Shooting SH1 - approx. 120 fps with selectable 60, 100, and 120 fps without blackout.
  • 4K video recording and vertical video mode.
  • Sensor dust reduction via a supersonic wave filter.
  • World's first Live Graduated Neutral Density shooting functionality.
  • Can withstand freezing temperatures down to -10 degrees C.
  • 50 MP handheld high-resolution shot and 80 MP tripod high-resolution shot.
  • Compatibility with UVC (USB Video Class) and UAC (USB Audio Class), allowing seamless connection to a PC for use as a webcam.
  • Twin UHS-II SD memory card slots.

Grad ND - A Fascinating New Feature

This technology uses computational photography to replicate the effects of using a half-ND filter, allowing the photographer to control brightness and darkness within the image, much like an external graduated neutral density filter.

Through Live GND shooting, photographers can adjust filter steps (GND2, GND4, or GND8) and types (soft, medium, or hard) in real-time through the EVF or rear LCD. This function allows for customization of the effect's position and angle.

Without the need for physical filters attached to the lens, photographers can leverage half ND effects, even with lenses lacking filter threads.

More AI Autofocus

Developed using deep learning technologies, the AI Detection AF has been enhanced to recognize an extensive array of subjects, including humans, formula racing cars, motorcycles, airplanes, helicopters, trains, birds, and common animals such as dogs and cats. This integration enhances the well-established Face Priority/Eye Priority AF, significantly refining autofocus capabilities. It can accurately identify subjects, even when individuals are in profile, facing away, or obscured by hidden facial features.

Subjects are tracked within the frame, ensuring they remain in focus. The OM-1 Mark II can follow intricate details like driver's helmets or the eyes of birds and other animals, going beyond what photographers could normally do on their own.

Who Should Buy the OM System OM-1 Mark II?

Wildlife and birding enthusiasts are at the top of the list. For example, combined with the new OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-600mm f/5.0-6.3 IS lens that provides effective focal lengths of up to 1200mm, and weighs just over 2,000 grams (4.4 lbs), photographers can easily work with this rig all day, no tripod required. And that's just one of the many telephotos available.

The OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/4 PRO provides an effective reach of 80-300mm and weighs a mere 382 grams (13.5 oz). The f/2.8 version weighs 760 grams (1.67 lb) and accepts both 1.4X and 2X matched teleconverters. Other top-tier options include the Olympus 300mm f/4 PRO and the Panasonic Leica DG Elmarit 200mm f/2.8.

Macro photography is also a strength of this system. There are a variety of optics well-suited for this work. Add the increased depth of field resulting from the Micro Four Thirds sensor, and the OM-1 is a godsend for super closeup photography. Lens options include the OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 90mm f/3.5, 60mm f/2.8, and the 30mm f/3.5 macro optics.

Travel photographers and journalists would also benefit from this system. Rugged design, compactness, and versatility make the OM-1 Mark II perfect for those covering the world while traveling light.

That's not to say this isn't an excellent system for general photography. There are many capable interchangeable lens cameras available these days. But very few combine the strengths of the OM System in such a compact package.

Should OM-1 Owners Upgrade to the OM-1 Mark II?

I'm wrestling with this question myself. I have my OM-1 sitting here on my desk, looking as fresh and new as the day I bought it, and trying to decide if I should invest in the Mark II.

For dedicated Micro Four Thirds photographers who use the OM-1, the Mark II would provide a solid upgrade and allow the original OM-1 to serve as a secondary camera.

The Mark II has improved performance. For example, in Pro Capture mode, the Mark II allows for retrospective capture of approximately 99 frames, an increase over the OM-1's 70 frames. For sequential shooting, the OM-1 Mark II can capture 219 frames in JPEG format or 213 frames in RAW at 120 fps, a dramatic improvement over the OM-1's 92 frames for each.

Add the autofocusing speed improvement with new features such as Live GND and vertical video capture, those could be important upgrades depending on your photography needs. Keep in mind that you can continue to use all of your existing MFT lenses and OM-1 accessories with the Mark II.

The big question is, do these benefits justify the $2,399 price tag? That answer lies between you and your credit card.

The Bottom Line

The OM System OM-1 Mark II is a powerhouse interchangeable lens camera that provides more compact options (thanks to MFT lenses) than its full-frame competitors. The Mark II is especially appealing for serious photographers who venture outside of the studio into harsh environments and changing conditions, and who require the versatility of the vast Micro Four Thirds lens catalog.

Unless you're a stay-at-home kind of guy, or that you really like the cardio workouts that come with lugging lots of gear up a trail, I would say that the latest OM-1 Mark II is for you.

Meike Releases New 50mm F1.8 Autofocus Lens for Z/E Mount for $159

You can read more and place your order on the Meike Global site.

The lens is easy to carry and its images are sharp and clear at any aperture. The band new 50mm/F1.8 uses the newest optical structure, making it able to achieve a large aperture of F1.8 while maintaining miniaturization and lightweight. Multi-layer coating technology is used on both sides of the lens to restore more realistic colors. The lens is not easy to attach dust or stains, and can be easily wiped clean.

The Nikon Z mount is available now. The Sony E mount will be available by the end of February 2024.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Why You Should Print Your Photos

You can watch the video and read the article on FStoppers.com

Printing images is a rewarding yet often overlooked aspect of photography. This process transforms digital captures into tangible art, playing a pivotal role in a photographer's creative expression and giving you a meaningful way to display your work.

Coming to you from Simon Baxter, this insightful video begins with Baxter sharing his passion for woodland photography and his meticulous approach to printing. He emphasizes the importance of not rushing the process, allowing images to mature over time. Baxter's philosophy resonates with photographers who view their work as a continual process rather than a series of isolated events. His method of revisiting and editing images based on evolving emotional connections is particularly interesting. This philosophy, treating each step from shooting to printing as interconnected, enriches the final artwork and imbues it with deeper personal significance.

Baxter also highlights the technical aspects of printing, such as monitor calibration and paper selection, underscoring their impact on the final print. His detailed explanation of how different papers can influence the mood and texture of an image provides valuable insights for photographers striving to fully realize their artistic intent. This attention to detail in the printing process is a testament to the craftsmanship that goes into each piece and how even small differences can affect the final output. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Baxter.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #931, Jan. 23, 2024. Today's theme is "5 Upcoming Photography Conferences to Consider." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

In a recent edition of my Nimble Photographer Newsletter, I wrote about the dearth of photo announcements at CES 2024. But that doesn't mean there aren't other events that will cater to our desire to learn more and see the latest in imaging equipment. This week, I'll share with you 5 upcoming events that will stimulate your mind and tempt your pocketbook. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 931

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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5 Upcoming Photography Conferences to Consider

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Sometimes it feels like all the cool photo shows have gone away. But that isn't the case. And if you'd like to get out among your peers, here are five upcoming events to consider.

Imaging U.S.A. - Jan. 28-30, Louisville, Kentucky

Imaging USA features classes, networking opportunities, and a huge trade show to help you feel inspired and ready to grow your photography business. This year we're bringing all the education and excitement to the Derby City. And to make your experience even more rewarding, pre-con classes are available in the days leading up to the conference.

90+ speakers, 130+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Capture One
  • Fujifilm North America
  • Godox
  • PlatyPod
  • Sigma
  • SmallRig
  • Tamron
  • Zeiss

Three-day all-access pass is $459. Expo only pass is free.

Camera & Imaging Photo Show CP+, February 22-25, 2024, Pacifico Yokohama, Japan

"Nothing Stays the Same" - CP+ is an event where camera fans from all over the world gather to see, touch, and share the joy of photography and video with their friends! For four days from February 22nd (Thu) to February 25th (Sun), 2024, an on-site event held at Pacifico Yokohama and an online event distributed online will be held simultaneously. Anyone can enjoy it, from camera and photography enthusiasts to those who regularly take and edit photos and videos with their smartphones and enjoy their daily lives using SMS.

60+ speakers, 90+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Epson
  • Fujifilm
  • Godox
  • Lexar
  • Lumix
  • OM System
  • Sigma
  • Synology
  • Tamron

Admission is free, but you must pre-register for onsite admission.

WPPI, March 3-7, 2024, Las Vegas, Nevada

For five days each year, portrait and wedding photographers and videographers come together in Las Vegas to be inspired. Be a part of this remarkable community - evolve your aesthetic, gain invaluable strategies to grow your business, connect with friends, be dazzled by stories from industry icons and create lasting memories.

130+ speakers, 80+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Capture One
  • PlatyPod
  • Godox
  • Sigma
  • Skylum
  • SmallRig
  • Tamron
  • Tenba

Four-day all-access pass is $199. Expo only pass is $49.

The Photography and Video Show, March 16-19, 2024, Birmingham, UK

From long exposure and layering, to business skills and incorporating AI into your workflow, your entry ticket will give you access to more than 350 seminars and live demos, with six stages and theatres to choose from. Led by experts and legends of photography, filmmaking and content creation, be prepared to learn new techniques and approaches; and be inspired to change your perspective on how you create!

100+ speakers, 200+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Capture One
  • Epson
  • Fujifilm
  • Gitzo
  • Godox
  • Ilford
  • Lowepro
  • Lumix
  • Manfrotto
  • OM System
  • Synology
  • Skylum
  • Tenba

48 pounds for a 4-day pass

Shutterfest, April 2-4, St. Louis, MO.

ShutterFest is an annual photography event that brings together thousands of professional photographers, photo enthusiasts, and industry experts from around the world. This event is unique in its approach to education and community building. Instead of focusing on traditional lecture-style presentations, ShutterFest offers hands-on classes, interactive experiences, and networking opportunities that help attendees develop their skills, build relationships, and grow their businesses.

One of the things that makes ShutterFest so unique is its focus on creativity and hands-on learning. Rather than providing a one-size-fits-all approach to photography, the conference encourages photographers to explore their own unique style and vision. The sessions are designed to help attendees break out of their comfort zones and try new techniques, styles, and approaches to their work. This emphasis on experimentation is what attracts many photographers to ShutterFest year after year.

What else makes ShutterFest so unique? The conference is designed to be a welcoming and inclusive space where photographers of all skill levels and backgrounds can connect, share their work, and learn from one another. This sense of community is built through a variety of events, including group shoots, networking sessions, and social events.

60+ speakers and 30+ vendors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Sigma
  • Westcott
  • Background Town
  • Tamron

Registration is $240 for classes and tradeshow.

Las Vegas Criminalizes Stopping For Selfies on Pedestrian Bridges

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com

On Tuesday, Las Vegas began enforcing a new ordinance that bans people from "stopping, standing or engaging in an activity that causes another person to stop" on pedestrian bridges and up to 20 feet surrounding connected stairs, escalators, and elevators.

Offenders who violate the measure could face a misdemeanor charge. If found guilty, they could face up to six months in jail or a $1,000 fine.

Clark County officials in Nevada, who voted unanimously to approve the measure earlier this month, say that the ban is not intended to target people stopping to take selfies or tourists pausing to watch and take photos of street performers.

Instead, Clark County officials claimed that the measure is intended to reduce crime and increase public safety by ensuring a continuous flow of pedestrian traffic across the bridges.

"The Pedestrian Flow Zone ordinance will help to ensure our world-class tourism destination remains a safe place for people to visit," Jennifer Cooper, Clark County's chief communications and strategy officer, says in a statement.

Restrictions on the Las Vegas Strip come two months after the Las Vegas Grand Prix -- where pedestrians crowded on bridges to take photos of the event -- and only six weeks before the Super Bowl in February, which is set to draw hundreds of thousands of people for those events.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #930, Jan. 16, 2024. Today's theme is "Looking Back and More, Now 2024." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Every January I close out my personal photo library from the previous year and start fresh with an empty catalog. Not only is this a practical endeavor, it's also an opportunity to acknowledge the highlights of the previous year. Today, I share the benefits of this annual exercise. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 930

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Looking Back and More, Now 2024

2023-in-review-1024.jpg

Despite my trials and tribulations in the past with Apple's Aperture, I still create annual libraries and store the neatly bundled catalogs in my multi-level archival system.

Why? It's just the way my brain works. I measure my life's journey signpost by signpost, year by year. Plus, I've discovered some additional benefits to this practice, a few of which I'm going to share today.

The Technical Part

By way of review, I maintain two personal libraries. The first, Photos, is totally automatic. I take a picture with my iPhone, it's added to my Photos library, backed up in iCloud, and that's that.

But I also have a Capture One Catalog. Pictures from my OM-1, X100V, and Nikon Zf are stored and edited here. Compared to the iPhone catalog, these images are more measured, captured in RAW, edited with C1P's excellent adjustment tools, and organized using its catalog tools.

Often, there is some topic duplication between the catalogs. And this is a good thing. Let's take our workshop in Sedona, AZ for example. My iPhone pictures go directly into Photos, while the images from the OM-1 are stored in Capture One Pro.

If I want to locate a shoot from years past, I can rely on the A.I. object recognition tools in Photos to help me remember the month and year. Who knows, I might even have an image there that suits my needs.

But if I want the more "serious" shots, I know exactly which Capture One Catalog to open. It saves me a tremendous amount of time. And it allows me to rotate off my laptop drive those big image libraries from previous years.

The Fun Part

So the technical part is all good and well. Every one of us has our own system for managing and retrieving pictures. But I've discovered an added benefit too. One that I hadn't anticipated.

It's easy to forget how much cool stuff happens in just a single year. Sure, we may still be basking in the glow of an event from last week, or even last month. But a couple of seasons ago. Those can get buried beneath the rigors of day-to-day life.

This short stroll down memory lane reminds me that 2023 was a better year than I realized. And it helps me appreciate the good fortune of my life. Want to join me for a quick trip?

[review highlights from my 2023 catalog.]

As a result of this exercise, I have a much more complete memory of my past year. Sure it had its challenges. There's a substantial 8-week lull when I was laid up with my recovery from the total joint replacement in my hip. But I still managed to take pictures around the house to maintain my sanity.

We are so busy, so distracted, and at times, so frustrated with daily life. It's easy to lose perspective. But looking back on my past year in pictures adds balance to my view of 2023. And it helps me appreciate the good moments in life all the more.

The Camera Accessory That Saved My Workflow? Peak Design Tech Pouch Review

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

If you're like me, you have a whole bunch of small photography bits--cables, connectors, SD cards, batteries, and more--in your camera bag. If you were to use a different bag, you'd have to take all of them out and transfer them over. That's how I lived for the first couple of years of my career, and it was awful.

I would always be triple- and quadruple-checking to make sure I had everything, sometimes forgetting which pocket I had moved it to and having to dig around in a panic. That's when I had to find a better way. Enter the Peak Design Tech Pouch.

For months, I started looking at different tech organizers to ideally hold all the random bits that I had between my camera bags. At the time, there were fewer competitors to the tech pouch. What I saw with the others was that they were either more tech/note organizers for office workers carrying far fewer things at once, or they were full sling bags, and I really wasn't looking for either. All I wanted was a simple organizer with photographers in mind that could handle all my random crap and move it seamlessly between bags.

While it is larger than other tech organizers, I find the size just about perfect to fit in the extra space of a camera bag. It's not so big that it's in the way of other gear that you could be carrying. It's also not too small that it can't carry everything that you need it to.

Having used this for a few years now, I can confirm that it is built to last. I try to be gentle with my gear as I like it to last a while, but I definitely don't baby things. Through all the time of use, this bag hardly has a blemish on it, let alone any substantial damage. All the external and internal zips work great, and still keep things dry if it's a rainier day.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

The 'Millennium Camera' Will Capture Arizona's Landscape for 1,000 Years

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com

An experiment organized by University of Arizona research associate and experimental philosopher Jonathan Keats, the Millennium Camera is meant to record an extremely long-exposure image that won't be complete for 100 decades.

The concept of the camera isn't too far removed from the beer can camera that Regina Valkenborgh set up at the Bayfordbury Observatory in the United Kingdom in 2012. In that case, the pinhole-style camera was in place for eight years and one month and captured what was at the time believed to be the longest exposure photo ever made.

If it works as planned, Keats' Millennium Camera will have that record beat by a lot more. It uses a similar pinhole design as Valkenborgh's beer can camera, but has elements made to extend the time the camera will operate. That pinhole leads to a thin sheet of 24-karat gold that will slowly let light through to a small copper cylinder mounted on top of a steel pole. Over the course of 1,000 years, the landscape in front of the pinhole camera will slowly fade a light-sensitive surface that is coated in thin layers of rose madder (an oil paint pigment), The University of Arizona explains.

In 100 decades, future humans will hopefully be able to open the Millennium Camera to reveal a long-exposure image of the area through all of the changes Tuscon will undergo. That is, of course, the hope anyway.

"One thousand years is a long time and there are so many reasons why this might not work," Keats says. "The camera might not even be around in a millennium. There are forces of nature and decisions people make, whether administrative or criminal, that could result in the camera not lasting."

If it does work, however, Keats says that the final image will likely show the longest-lasting features -- like mountains and rocks -- sharpest while the most dynamic parts such as the city itself will be softer. "Sharp" is also used loosely, as the land itself is not completely stable and will experience subtle motion over the extended exposure time.

The Millennium Camera is currently installed on Tumamoc Hill next to a bench that faces west over the Star Pass neighborhood of Tuscon. With it is a small plaque that encourages visitors to imagine what the future holds.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Nikkor Z 26mm f/2.8 pancake has been a polarizing lens. Those who really like it, such as myself, appreciate its compactness and terrific image quality. While others think it's too slow focusing and noisy.

IMG_0730.jpeg 26mm Z with included lens hood on a Nikon Zf.

After spending some time with this wide angle on my Nikon Zf full-frame mirrorless camera, I can say that the 26mm has been wonderful for travel, street photography, and events. Let's take a closer look to see what you think.

IMG_0747.jpeg 26mm Z, no lens hood, mounted on a Nikon Zf.

What I Like About the Nikkor Z 26mm

  • Compact (0.9" long)
  • Wide Angle of View (79 degrees)
  • Bright Maximum Aperture (f/2.8)
  • Dust and Drip Resistant
  • Metal Lens Mount and Solid Construction
  • Outstanding Center Sharpness
  • Close Focusing Capability Is Very Useful
  • Includes Clever Lens Hood and Slip-On Cap
  • Looks Fantastic on the Nikon Zf

What I Don't Like About the Nikkor Z 26mm

Some reviewers have complained about the focusing noise. Yes, you can hear it - not so much on the street, but sitting in a quiet room. So I would say that this isn't an optic for weddings and funerals. But for my purposes, noise isn't an issue.

Another complaint I've read is that it is slow-focusing. For example, if you compare it to the Nikkor Z 50mm f/1.8 S ($626 and 3" long), the 26mm will be slower. It's even slower than my Nikkor Z 24mm-50mm zoom. That being said, I don't think I lost one shot in San Francisco due to its focusing ability. My recommendation is that you don't use it for fast-action photography.

Photography is about tradeoffs - figuring out what you need for a shoot, and what you can live without. In my view, the Nikkor Z 26mm f/2.8 is well-suited for travel photography, urban work, and most events. Its pluses are compactness, a relatively fast aperture, and excellent sharpness.

Bottom Line

Once you recover from having spent $200 more than you would have for the Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 lens, you're likely going to be happy with your investment. The 26mm f/2.8 is a gem of a lens. It makes full-frame photography so much more portable. And the images it produces are beautiful.

A Few Pictures with the Nikkor Z 26mm on a Nikon Zf

ZF1_1319-12-03 San Francisco Zf-1024.jpg

ZF1_1289-12-03 San Fran-1024-V2.jpg

ZF1_1414-12-03 San Francisco Zf-1024.jpg

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Photos by Derrick Story.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #929, Jan. 9, 2024. Today's theme is "The Elephant in the Room - Nikon Zf vs Olympus OM-1." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Typically, Micro Four Thirds photographers aren't concerned by new full-frame camera announcements. They know what they have, and they like it. But the Nikon Zf seems to have upset the apple cart a bit. I've been getting mail citing reviews, defections, and the relevance of MFT photography in light of all this. So let's talk about it. Let's go head to head with the Olympus OM-1 and Nikon Zf. Today's top story on the TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 929

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The Elephant in the Room - Nikon Zf vs Olympus OM-1

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Let's set the stage a bit for this comparison. The OM System OM-1 was released in March 2022. It has a Micro Four Thirds sensor and is currently selling for $1,999.

The Nikon Zf started shipping in October 2023, employs a full-frame sensor, and is currently available for $1,996.

Even though the two cameras use completely different sensors, they are competitors. They cost about the same, appeal to serious enthusiasts, have appealing body designs, and are packed with the latest that imaging technology has to offer.

But they are very different cameras in many ways too. So let's take a look at their respective strengths and compare them.

OM System OM-1 Strengths

  • Telephoto Muscle - Anything over 105mm usually means the OM-1. My favorite combination is the 40-150mm f/2.8 with or without the 1.4X teleconverter.
  • Macro Photography - The Micro Four Thirds System is just so good at close-up photography. I have both the 60mm and 30mm macros.
  • Inclement Weather - I'm comfortable shooting with the OM-1 in just about any environment. It's a robust companion during outdoor adventures.
  • Long Days - If I'm going to be on my feet with gear for the bulk of the day, I want the OM System.
  • Carry-On Air Travel - I can put together a kit for an entire trip in a bag about the size of a kid's lunchbox - and have everything I need.
  • Clever Technology - Live ND, Live Time, Live Composite, in-camera focus stacking, are all examples of the cool tech OM System includes in their cameras.
  • More Lenses - Not only does the Micro Four Thirds lens catalog feature practically any optic that I could need, it also usually has multiple versions of it in different sizes and maximum apertures.

Nikon Zf Strengths

  • Street Photography - I know it sounds weird, but I prefer the Zf for street photography and urban exploration. With the pancake 26mm f/2.8 and the compact 24-50mm zoom, the camera has a nice balance and can work just about any angle.
  • Low Light Situations - I've never had a camera where I could increase the ISO to 25,600 without a second thought about quality.
  • Vintage Lenses - Nothing comes close to the Zf for vintage lens work. With the FTZ II adapter, I can use my Steve McCurry 105mm f/2.5 tele one moment, and the wonderful Nikkor G 24-85mm zoom the next. With no crop factor to contend with, the lens I put on there is the lens I get.
  • Portrait Assignments - I had been using the Nikon D610 for portrait work, a camera that I still very much like, but the Zf is an entirely different planet. Features like built-in Skin Softening and Portrait Enhancement make the job so much easier.
  • Aestetics - In my opinion, only the Olympus PEN-F rivals the handsome looks of the Nikon Zf.

Why Switching Doesn't Make Sense

I could never imagine a scenario when I would sell all of my Olympus gear to bulk up the Nikon Z system. For me, it would be like saying that I'm going to sell my pliers to buy a screwdriver.

But depending on what type of photographer you are, you may feel that you need a little bit of both. I realize that this is a total luxury. But as long as I'm traveling for photography workshops, covering events, and working in the unpredictable outdoors, I will be using my OM-1 system.

At the same time, I loved shooting with the Nikon Zf in San Francisco, capturing portraits with it for a recent article, and walking into a darkened haunted house, then emerging with incredible shots for the customer.

I wouldn't recommend investing in pricy, hefty full-frame telephotos for the Z System. Compact wide angles and short zooms are a better fit. When it's time to go to Safari West this coming Autumn for a workshop, I'll be packing the OM-1 with 40-150mm f/2.8 zoom, and the 1.4X teleconverter.

Now, I think OM System can quiet a lot of this chatter by releasing a great camera (or two) in 2024. In the meantime, if you own an OM-1 and are happy with it, ignore the switchers. And if your budget allows for another camera, I think the Zf would be a lovely complement to your existing system.

Basic Lens Kit for Each Camera

For the OM-1, I have a super-compact kit that includes the 14-42mm EZ Olympus zoom, Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II, 45mm f/1.8 Olympus prime, and the 35-100mm Panasonic zoom.

For the Nikon Zf I'm packing the 26mm f/2.8 pancake, 40mm f/2.0 SE, 24-50mm compact zoom, and the Nikon G 24-85mm zoom with the FTZ II adapter.

How To Turn Your Apple Watch Into A Camera Remote And Timer

You can read the entire article on SlashGear.com

How many times do you use your iPhone camera in a day? If you're a photography enthusiast, content creator, or just someone who loves collecting snapshots of their favorite memories, you've probably answered "a lot." It's no surprise, though, considering the quality of the output and the many nifty photo editing features built into the iPhone. However, if you're using your iPhone camera a lot, then you're probably also familiar with the all too frustrating problem of wanting to pose a few meters away but being unable to run back and forth to set up your iPhone's camera timer´┐Żover and over. It can be quite a chore no doubt, especially when you're out and about and don't have the luxury of bringing a tripod with a remote.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch has your back. This versatile device on your wrist can actually double as a camera remote and timer for your iPhone, so you won't have to waste a good photo or video opportunity ever again. Here's a quick guide on how to use it as such.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Follow Up to My Escape to San Francisco

During last week's podcast I discussed how I had come down with a serious case of cabin fever, and my plan to overcome it. I'm happy to report that the therapy treatment in San Francisco solved the problem.

If you want to read about my adventure, and see all the pictures, check out this free link to my article titled, 26mm and Be There.

It's amazing how therapeutic a photo shoot can be.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #928, Jan. 2, 2024. Today's theme is "All Dressed Up with Nowhere to Go" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I have just taken my 100th portrait of the cat. All the blooms have fallen off the Christmas Cactus in the window box. As I sit here watching the rain outside, surrounded by all of this great camera gear, I'm jonesing for a photo adventure. But not today. How I plan to cope with my internment is the lead story in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 928

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

All Dressed Up with Nowhere to Go

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I feel like one of those guys with an electronic ankle bracelet, wandering around the studio with a Nikon Zf around my neck looking for something compelling to photograph.

Now I know how the cat feels. I watch her explore every corner of the living room in search of something to play with. Sometimes she lucks out and finds an unlucky bug. Poor little bugger. His minutes are numbered.

So I take a picture of the cat. She looks for spiders. And the rain keeps pouring down.

Don't get me wrong. I'm thankful for the rain. It is filling our reservoirs and adding fresh water to my open barrels in the backyard. And sometimes I even take pictures in the rain. But it isn't really fun. And it doesn't last for long.

I've figured out all sorts of cool things during my interment. I've adapted my favorite Pentax lens, the Pentax HD DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens, to my OM-1. It's going to be fantastic for landscape and portraits with its 140mm equivalent focal length on my favorite all-time cropped sensor camera. But not today.

I've been testing the amazing NIKKOR Z 26mm f/2.8 pancake lens on the Nikon Zf. The combo is so addictive that I walk around the studio with it all day. But this thoroughbred needs to run. And today is not that day.

I've reorganized both of my camera kits a dozen times. Should I include the 45mm f/1.8 or the 45mm f/1.2 with the OM-1? Is there enough room for both the 40mm and 50mm in my Nikon bag? Maybe I should start over.

I even pulled out all of my tripods yesterday and started switching their heads. Now I have a Joby head on the Induro and the Induro head on the Manfrotto. Anything other than a Manfrotto head is an improvement.

Finally, after this low point, I decided that I needed to do something meaningful. And fortunately, an opportunity presented itself.

Theresa gifted me and the boys tickets to a Saturday Warriors game. I checked the weather report, and there's no rain that afternoon. So I got out my street photography black shirt, oversized jacket, and gray Warriors cap. I tucked the Zf with 26mm pancake into a softball-sized shoulder pouch that I could wear inside of my jacket, and put the iPhone 15 Pro Max in my front jeans pocket.

I'll arrive in the City a couple hours before I'm to meet the boys and engage in some serious photography. Then I'll catch the Metro T down to Mission Bay to meet the boys. My super compact pouch meets the bag requirements for Chase Center, and the short lens won't get me in trouble.

The three of us will then enjoy the game, and then I will reverse course back to the parking garage at the north end of The City, shooting pictures all along the way.

If this plan works, I will have much to report next week. Stay tuned. (I'm totally excited!)

Why One Photographer Prefers Micro Four Thirds

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

How Websites Have Become Practically Unuseable

A short commentary.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.