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If you have an Aperture or iPhoto library that you would like to bring in to the Photos for OS X environment, then migration makes a lot of sense.

I recommend that your start with a smaller library to get a feel for the migration process. And there are a few gotchas you should be aware of.

  • Unless you make the migrated library your "System Library," it won't be connected to iCloud and available across all devices. You can only have one System Library.
  • It isn't easy to merge libraries. There isn't really a process for this. So if you wanted to combine an existing System Library, with a newly converted library, you'll most likely be disappointed.
  • You can switch among libraries in Photos for OS X. So you can go back and forth between a System Library and one that has been migrated.

choose-library.jpg

Of course all of this could change in future updates. But if you want to know the best procedure for migration now, and what you can and cannot do once go through the process, watch my lynda movie on the subject. I'll walk you through the migration steps.


Get Up and Running with Photos for OS X

Want to learn the ins and outs of Apple's latest photo management application? Then take a look at my latest online video training, Up and Running with Photos for OS X. Soon, both you, and your pictures, will be comfortable in their new home.

Previous Articles on Photos for OS X

How to Switch to RAW Files in Photos for OS X.

Converting an Aperture or iPhoto Library to Photos for OS X.

How to Open an Aperture or iPhoto Library in Photos for OS X.

Apple has provided a migration path to Photos for OS X for Aperture and iPhoto users. The path does have a twist or two. In this movie from my lynda.com title, Up and Running with Photos for OS X, I show you a few of the options for making the move from your existing photo management app to the latest option for those running Yosemite on their Macs.


Get Up and Running with Photos for OS X

Want to learn the ins and outs of Apple's latest photo management application? Then take a look at my latest online video training, Up and Running with Photos for OS X. Soon, both you, and your pictures, will be comfortable in their new home.

convert-aperture.jpg

Previous Articles on Photos for OS X

How to Switch to RAW Files in Photos for OS X.

How to Open an Aperture or iPhoto Library in Photos for OS X.

Want to learn the ins and outs of Apple's latest photo management software, then take a look at my Up and Running with Photos for OS X title, just released by lynda.com.

I provide tips and techniques for image editing, exporting, sharing, cloud storage, and making the transition from Aperture or iPhoto. In just a short time, you (and your pictures) will be comfortable in their new home.

image-edit-photos.jpg Lean how to use all of the image editing tools in Photos for OS X.

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If you're shooting RAW+Jpeg and upload those images to Photos for OS X, the application typically places the Jpeg forward. You can tell that this is the case via the badge in the lower left corner of the image with a "J" on top. (See second illustration.)

switch-to-raw.jpg In editing mode, you can tell Photos to switch to the RAW file.

Most photographers will want to edit the RAW file in post production. You can tell Photos that you want to work on the RAW by following these steps.

  • Double-click on the thumbnail to enlarge it, then click on the Edit button in the upper right corner.
  • Go to Image > Use RAW as Original.
  • Edit as normally, then click the Done button.

switched-to-raw.jpg

You'll notice that when you go back to thumbnails, the badge will now have an "R" on top instead of a "J", indicating that the RAW is the working image. You can control these badges by going to View > Metadata and turning on and off the ones you want.

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Apple has released Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 6.04 that supports 14 new cameras including the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, but only for 16MP RAWs, not the 40MP High Resolution Shot files.

E-M5MarkII_SLV_TDS.jpg

The cameras on the following list will now have RAW support in Aperture, iPhoto, and Photos for OS X.

  • Canon EOS 5DS
  • Canon EOS 5DS R
  • Canon EOS Rebel T6i / 750D / Kiss X8i
  • Canon EOS Rebel T6s / 760D / Kiss 8000D
  • Fujifilm X-A2
  • Hasselblad CFV-50c
  • Hasselblad H5D-50c
  • Leica C (Typ 112)
  • Nikon 1 S2
  • Nikon D7200
  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
  • Panasonic LUMIX CM1
  • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF7
  • Pentax MX-1

I tested the RAW files from the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II in Aperture, and they look great.

For most Mac users, the update should have been automatically applied last night. But you can check for yourself by going to App Store > Updates.

Happy to see that Apple is keeping our photo software up to date.

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