Recently in Capture One Pro

Demystifying Color Balance in Capture One Pro 10

My phobia of color wheels began back in the original Final Cut days. I would look at them, then devise any other method to make the correction. And it wasn't until Capture One Pro that I overcame my prejudice and learned that they are truly helpful... and easy.

color-adjust-with-cb.jpg Fine tuning a portrait shoot with Color Balance in Capture One Pro. Photo by Derrick Story.

Currently, I'm in the middle of recording a Capture One 10 title for lynda.com. (My existing Capture One Pro 9 Essential Training is very popular, and we wanted to integrate the new features.

When I finished the movie on Color Balance, I had to laugh at myself. It's so fun. What was my problem before? So I thought that if you shared my previous phobia, this should help. Here are the basic controls for each of the color wheels.

Color-Balance-CP1-web.jpg The midtone adjustment in the Color Balance panel of Capture One Pro.

  • Drag the point in the middle of the circle to change the color. This could cover the entire image with the Master color balance, or the basic tonal areas with Shadow, Midtone, and Highlight wheels.
  • The tiny handle on the edge of the color wheel is to fine-tune the hue.
  • Once you set the color you want, use the left side slider to adjust saturation.
  • The right side slider is for brightness.

Start by choosing the Color you want to shift to in the shadows, midtones, or highlights, then fine tune it with the Hue handle. Next, work the Saturation slider until the effect is exactly to your taste, then finish off with Brightness. It's easy! And the effects are amazing.

To see the Before and After, hold down the Option/Alt key and click on the Reset arrow in the Color Balance panel. That will show you the image without your adjustments. Let go of the mouse, and your adjustments will appear again.

Start with a simple image to practice. Once you get the hang of it, you'll be visiting the Color Balance adjustment on a regular basis... and dramatically improving your images along the way.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capture One Pro is one of the most powerful, flexible, photo management applications available. So powerful, in fact, that you may get lost configuring your catalog for optimal organization. If that's been the case for you, I can bring some clarity to your life, or at least to your photo management.

capture-1-library-mgmt-web.jpg

My latest lynda.com title, Advanced Capture One Pro: Library Management, shows you how to organize like a pro, covering techniques for referenced and managed catalogs, plus integrating sessions, backing up masters, and configuring your Capture One environment specifically to your needs. Take a look at this 1-minute introductory video for the course.

These techniques work for photographers using Capture One 8, 9, and 10. I have testing these approaches with my own Capture One catalog that manages my professional photography business. And I think that it will help you tame yours.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I love the RAW editing tools in Capture One Pro. But there are times when I want to tap the magic of Luminar and its extensive set of filters. And I don't want to compromise my digital asset management system to do so. As a result, I needed to figure out how to get these two kids to play together. And that's what I'm going to show you right now.

luminar-in-c1p.jpg Image edited in Luminar, then returned to Capture One Pro for asset management. Photos by Derrick Story.

Going from Capture One Pro to Luminar

Since you're not going to get a clean roundtrip from Capture One to Luminar then back, the next best thing is to use the Open With... command in Capture One (right-click on the image and choose Open With... from the popup menu). Luminar can process your RAW files, so you're sending over a high quality image for editing. Select Luminar from the popup menu, and the image will open in the app.

open-with-command.png

Edit in Luminar

Edit as you normally would in Luminar, using the filters and presets to achieve the look you want. Once the image is ready to send back to Capture One, choose the Export command in Luminar, File > Export. This is the point where you have to think about your file organization.

Sending Back to Capture One Pro

My recommendation is to set up a standard receiving folder for the Luminar images, then import from that folder back into Capture One. Mine is a referenced system, leaving the images where they are and pointing the Capture One database to them. I tend to send back full sized Jpegs to keep file size reasonable. But you can choose Tiffs or another format, if you wish, during the export process.

before-after.jpg The before and after for this image in Luminar.

I add the word Luminar to the file name when exporting it, so I will know a bit about the picture's history when reviewing it in the Capture One catalog. Since the file name for the edited image is the same as the original, except for having Luminar at the end, the picture shows up in the catalog next to the original.

image-in-c1p.jpg Luminar image back in Capture One Pro for asset management.

All my IPTC and EXIF metadata is intact, and I now have another powerful option for working on my images stored in Capture One. If I do a lot of work to the shot in Luminar, multiple layers for example, I may also want to save the image as a separate Luminar file so I can go back and pick up my work at a later time. I can always export the updated version into Capture One Pro for management with the others.

Haven't tried Luminar? You can download a free trial here.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Photography is both my hobby and a substantial revenue stream. I once kept both worlds in the same application (Aperture), but over the last couple years, I've separated my personal work from what I shoot for hire.

Capture-One-Wildspeak.jpg

Technology has had much to do with this. In 2012, for example, I shot just about everything with the same camera. iPhones weren't as good, Cloud sharing not as robust, and my workflow was essentially to remove the card from the camera, insert it into my Mac, and load everything into Aperture.

But 2017 is much different. I love shooting my day to day life with the iPhone, Olympus TG-4, and a variety of 35mm film cameras. The digital images flow right into my Photos for iOS and macOS apps, and they're instantly available to share, print, and post. It's easy and enjoyable. I've never been happier as a hobbyist.

My professional jobs involve higher resolution cameras, bigger files, larger quantities for each session, multiple export options, and serving as an archive for my clients. And for this work, Capture One Pro 10 has become my go-to app. Here are five reasons why.

Old School Organization

The tools for catalog management include projects, albums, groups (the equivalent of folders in Aperture), and everything else that I need to slice and dice a shoot. Plus, I can also manage content on my hard drives right there in the Capture One interface.

When I load thousands of images into a catalog, I want to be able to tame them as quickly as possible. Capture One makes that easy.

Excellent RAW Processing

The Capture One look is different than any other processor that I've used. It's bold. My RAW files jump off the screen even before I begin editing them.

Robust Editing Tools

Ninety-five percent of the time, I can handle all of my image editing in Capture One Pro. Starting with the amazing Contrast slider (that is far more than you'd think), to sophisticated color tools, to lens corrections, to localized editing brushes... this app provides what I need to get the most out of my images.

Flexible Output Options

The Output tab screams professional app. Here I can create a variety of custom export options to run individually or all at once. So if I need a set of master images to send to the client, and another set of web shots for an online gallery, Capture One Pro can provide that for me all at once.

Versatile Catalog Management

I can run a managed catalog or choose to go referenced with external hard drives storing my masters... on both Mac and PC platforms. I can enable a Session while on the road or working on a specific assignment, then incorporate that content into my master catalog. And I can do just about anything else I want with the Capture One Pro catalog structure. Perfect for guys like me who travel and have a master setup back at the studio.

I'm entering my second complete year with Capture One Pro. And I have to say... it feels great to have made a complete transition from Aperture.

Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Maybe it's because Capture One Pro has so many sophisticated tools that enthusiast photographers overlook the handy (and simple) Auto Adjustments option. But in my experience, I've found it quite helpful.

set-up-auto-settings.jpg

Look for the "Big A" in the top toolbar. If you click on its smaller down-pointing arrow, you can selected the adjustments that will be included in the Auto fix. I use the top four: White Balance, Exposure, High Dynamic Range, and Levels, as shown in the illustration above.

To apply these all at once, just click on an image, then click on the Big A button. Presto, your image is adjusted. You can see what Capture One did by checking the Tools panel on the left. You can fine tune any of the sliders that you wish. If you don't like the new look at all, click CMD-R to Reset.

applying-auto-settings.jpg

Auto Adjust can also by applied on Import. Check the Auto Adjustments box in the Adjustments brick in the Import dialog box. Capture One Pro will apply the changes as it generates the previews.

In general, I've found that using Auto Adjust saves me time, especially when processing a big shoot that was captured in a non-controlled environment. If you haven't tried this feature yet, take it for a spin. You might like where you end up.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is the moment I've been waiting for. I had been sitting on hundreds of RAW files from my Iceland test of the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, and I wanted to see how those images really looked. And now I know... Stunning.

Icelandic Ponies RAW file from Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II with 12-100mm PRO lens processed in Capture One Pro 10. Photos by Derrick Story.

The combination of the E-M1's imaging pipeline, combined with the sharpness of the 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO Lens and the crunchy RAW processing of Capture One Pro 10, makes for quite a trio.

Icelandic Ponies Grazing

PA270237-Iceland-2016-Derrick-Story.jpg

I'll be reporting on additional aspects of Capture One Pro 10 in upcoming posts. But I wanted you to see firsthand what this software does with RAW files from the E-M1 Mark II.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I forgot to adjust one of my cameras to the proper time here in Iceland. And those images were driving me crazy in my Capture One catalog because they were out of order. Unfortunately, I discovered that there was no easy way to fix this problem within Capture One.

PA270026-TG-4 web2.jpg The original time stamp for this shot of Skogafoss Falls, Iceland was 7 hours off. I needed to fix that. Olympus TG-4 in Program mode. Image by Derrick Story.

After a great deal of hunting, I discovered that I must leave the application for my fix. So, I turned to Photos for macOS, which does have a batch time stamp fix tool. The basic task went like this.

  • Export images out of Capture One Pro.
  • Delete the existing shots from the Capture One Catalog.
  • Create a new library in Photos for macOS.
  • Import pictures into Photos.
  • Use the Adjust Date and Time tool in Photos to fix the time stamps.
  • Export the images out of Photos and back into Capture One Pro.

I was very careful along the way and backed everything up, just in case something went wrong. But I have to say that the entire process was a real hassle. In the future, I'm going to be more diligent about checking the time stamps on all of my cameras. I certainly don't want to spend time on this again.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

Master Photos for OS X

(It's More Powerful than You Think)

For hands-on tutorials, be sure to take a look at Photos for OS X Essential Training on lynda.com. I cover everything you need to know to get the most from this surprisingly powerful image management application.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Connecting Capture One to Aurora HDR

Once my RAW file sequences are safe and sound in Capture One Pro, I can open them in Aurora HDR for finishing the work. Here are the four basic steps I use to make this connection.

Step 1 - Select your three shots in Capture One, then use the Open With command. I right-click on one of the thumbnails to reveal this popup menu.

01-open-with.jpg

Step 2 - Check the Alignment box in the following screen, and make any additional choices required for your images.

02-make-settings.jpg

Step 3 - Once Aurora HDR has processed your images, you can choose from the presets to get the look you want. Presets are revealed by clicking on the big, round icon in the lower right corner.

03-choose-preset.jpg

I often adjust the amount of the preset, then fine tune its settings by working the sliders in the Tools panel.

Step 4 - Export the final version of the shot by choosing File > Export to Image in Aurora HDR. Since I'm usually sending this photo back to Capture One, I export a full-size, 8-bit Tiff file. I then import that Tiff back into Capture One and keep it in the same project as the original shots.

04-export-image.jpg

The exported image can be worked on some more with Capture One tools. I keep the finished HDRs in their own album, within the Project. That way they're easily accessible when I want to display them or export out as lower resolution Jpeg.

If you want to save the work you've done in Aurora HDR, then use the Save command. That file can be reopened in the state that you left it for further fine tuning.

Bridgeport-Dusk-2016.jpg "Bridgeport General Store at Dusk" Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 prime at ISO 320, handheld. Images by Derrick Story.

Capture One and Aurora HDR are a terrific tandem for creating and managing high quality dynamic range images from your RAW file sequences.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Existing light street photography is a blast, but it sometimes leads to off-putting colors. Fortunately, the images can easily be corrected in two steps using Capture One Pro.

original-image.jpg Original image captured in a shop in downtown Lahaina, Maui.

Here's the original image captured on Kodak 400 negative film. Whether the picture is analog or digital, the same sort of things can happen with artificial lighting. The first step is to go to the Color Tab in Capture One Pro and make a White Balance adjustment.

I use the eye dropper and click on a neutral tone in the image. This gets me half way there. The correction is an improvement, but not exactly what I want. I could continue to fine tune with the Kelvin and Tint sliders in the White Balance tool if I wanted. But I have another option too.

white-balance-adj.jpg Using the White Balance adjustment certainly helps.

What I prefer to do, however, is to use the Color Balance tool that's right beneath White Balance. Since my main problem is the green hue caused by the fluorescent lighting, I offset it with moving the center circle indicator towards the red.

I'm I'm not exactly sure what I need to do, I can move the circle indicator all around until I find something that I like. Since this is a global adjustment affecting highlights, shadows, and mid-tones, I start my work within the Master tab. But I often continue to play with the different options in the Color Balance panel. I like the 3-Way Control that provides adjustments for shadows, highlights, and mid-tones individually.

color-balance-v2.jpg Being able to fine tune with the Color Balance tool provides even more control.

Just like everything else in Capture One Pro, you can save these adjustments as presets, or Copy and Apply the settings to other images that have similar lighting problems. The entire process is very fast. And getting rid of unwanted color casts really improves existing light images in urban settings.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capture One Pro has arguably the best Aperture library import tool available. You can simply open a new Capture One Catalog, go to File > Import Catalog > Aperture Library, and begin the transition from Aperture to Capture One Pro.

After doing so, how do your Aperture images look in C1? Is the library structure retained. How does the RAW processing compare?

In this 6-minute video, I show you how an Aperture library looks in Capture One Pro. And without giving away too much, I'll tell you now that the transition is pretty darn smooth.

If you've been procrastinating making the move from Aperture to Capture One Pro, this movie should provide some motivation. And since we are going into the off-season for photographers, why not make this your end of year project? Then you can start 2017 with a fresh Capture One catalog.

captureone-aperture_import.png

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capture One 9.3 Safe for macOS Sierra

Aside from Eizo monitor support and calibration, there aren't a lot of new features in Capture One Pro 9.3. But there are bug fixes, improved metadata handling, and new camera support. You can see the entire list of newly supported optics and bodies here.

capture-one-sierra.jpg

I tested C1 9.3 on macOS Sierra, and I'm happy to report that everything ran smoothly. Performance was snappy, and there were no hiccups that I could detect. So I recommend that you update both the macOS and Capture One Pro at your earliest convenience.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The image editing tools in Capture One Pro are excellent. But there are times when I need to clone an area or use content aware, which is a strength of the venerable editing app. Fortunately, the two programs play well together, and here's how it works.

reflector-in-shot-web.jpg This fix is easier in Photoshop.

Here's a perfect example. There's a bit of a reflector in the above shot, and I don't have an easy way to fix it in Capture One Pro. So I right-click on the image and choose Edit With... from the popup menu. I then select Photoshop from the list of editing options.

fix-in-photoshop.jpg Easy fix in Photoshop.

In just a matter of seconds, I have removed the reflector with the Clone Stamp tool in Photoshop. Now all I have to do is go to File > Save, and the corrected picture is returned to my Capture One Pro library. Generally speaking, the roundtripped photo is placed before the original in the thumbnail view. It will also be a Tiff file compared to the RAW that you probably started with.

back-in-capture-one.jpg

Back in Capture One, I can continue to fine tune the shot, export it, or do anything else that I need to.

Just a few things to note: Capture one won't let you send an image from a smart album, you have to jump over to a regular album or collection. Also, after you choose Save in Photoshop, the image does return to Capture One, but it also just stays there in Photoshop. You can merely close it, or do something else with it if you wish.

Capture One and Photoshop work well together, and the only really penalty you pay is adding a Tiff file to your catalog that lives beside the existing content.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

During our TDS Photography Workshop in Pt. Reyes, CA, I put forth the idea of working in B&W over the course of the event.

P8203873-BW-Tomales.jpg Skipper on Thistle flower. Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO zoom in monochrome mode. Photos by Derrick Story.

Since many of the participants had mirrorless cameras with electronic viewfinders, we could view the beautiful Northern California landscape in Black & White right there in our cameras. I consider this a wonderful feature that makes this type of capture even more exciting.

Another nice feature is the ability to shoot in RAW+Jpeg. In my case, my Jpegs were the monochrome images, recorded at full resolution with SuperFine compression. But I still had the corresponding RAWs for each shot. This provided me the luxury of choosing which version I liked best for any given scene.

P8214009-BW-Pt-Reyes Tomales Point. Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 14-42mm EZ zoom in monochrome mode.

I was surprised at how often I liked the monochrome better. Yes, I had anticipated that some of the landscape scenes would look great in B&W, but I was delighted that many of the wildlife images looked great too.

P8213932-BW-Pt-Reyes Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO zoom in monochrome mode.

Because the monochromes were Jpegs, I knew that I would be able to edit them quite as much as the RAW files (although they held up better than I anticipated). So I did try extra hard to get them right in the camera. I think this led to me slowing down a bit and really enjoying the experience of photographing the diversity of Pt. Reyes.

P8203907-BW-Tomales Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 9mm "lens cap" fisheye in monochrome mode.

A few of our photographers also went this route and created very artistic images. Others stuck with RAW and converted to B&W in post. But almost everyone shared a stunning monochrome or two during our class presentation at the end of the workshop.

P8203880-BW-Tomales Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO zoom in monochrome mode.

So what's my conclusion after this artistic experiment? I think I'm going to use this technique more often. I really don't have anything to lose with RAW+Jpeg, and I felt that my concentration was improved while shooting. Not to mention that I really like some of the images.

Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

I cataloged and fine tuned these images with Capture One Pro. If you want to learn how to work with your photographs in this application, check out Capture One Pro Essential Training, now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I've been having a blast this summer shooting with my Olympus TG-4, in part because it records the location data for every picture I take. Many of these images end up in my Capture One Pro catalog... geotags in all.

Capture-One-GPS-web.jpg

But what happens from there? To see what's going on, click on the Metadata tab (i) in the toolbar on the upper left side. You'll have to scroll down a bit, but there is an EXIF-GPS brick that lists latitude, longitude, and altitude. So you can indeed confirm that your image has location data.

Google_Maps-Location-web.jpg

There's also a "Show on map" label in the GPS box. If you click on it, you're transported to Google Maps where you can see your location, share it with others, or send it to a mobile device. You'll need an Internet connection for this to work.

If you didn't know the name of the place where you took the shot, you can copy it from Google Maps, return to the Metadata tab in Capture One Pro, and add the info to the IPTC location fields. It's not quite as seamless as Photos for OS X or Lightroom, but it does work well.

So as the Summer continues, I'm going to keep shooting with my TG-4 and uploading those files to my Capture One Pro catalog.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Mac Photographers managing a large catalog of images may prefer Capture One Pro to Apple's homegrown Photos app. But that doesn't mean they have to give up iCloud connectivity to do so. Here's how to connect your Capture One catalog to your iPhone and other iCloud-enabled devices.

export-folder.jpg

On Your Mac

The first thing you want to do is set up an Capture One Export folder in your iCloud Drive. I'm assuming that you have both iCloud and iCloud Drive enabled. If not, you'll need to do this first.

iCloud Drive will be available in the Favorites sidebar on the left side of any Finder window. Click on it once to open it, then create a new folder inside and label it Capture One Export. This will be the destination for the images that you want to export from Capture One Pro to your iOS device.

Create a New Process Recipe in Capture One Pro

Now go to the Output tool tab in Capture One Pro, and create a new process receipt. I would call it iCloud Export. Choose the parameters you want for the images that will be exported to your iCloud account. Here's how I set mine up.

iCloud-process.jpg

Now all you have to do is select one of more images, then run the iCloud Export process. The images will be placed in the Capture One Export folder, then shortly automatically uploaded to your iCloud account.

Seeing Your Images on the iPhone

icloud-drive.jpg

Now open the iCloud Drive app on your iPhone or iPad. You should see the Capture One Export Folder inside. Tap on it, and the pictures you exported from Capture One will be inside. From this point, you can save them to your Camera Roll (Save Image) or open them in another application. They're also available for Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

The good news is, that you don't have to give up pro level image management to enjoy iCloud connectivity. Set up your export folder today, and get those images onto your iOS devices.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

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One of the primary reasons that I moved from Aperture to Capture One Pro was that I felt comfortable with its organization tools. Yes, I like my catalog neat and tidy, and here's how I do that.

groups-and-projects.jpg

It's all about the hierarchy. At the top are Groups, which is Capture One terminology for what we typically call folders. I create my top level Group by navigating to User Collections, then clicking on the + icon. I then choose Group Inside...

For my catalog, this is usually a year, such as 2016. Moving forward, I keep my images in Projects, which look like little file boxes. Click on your Group once to highlight it, then click on the + and choose Project Inside... to create a new Project inside of that Group.

Projects need Albums to contain the actual image files. Click on your newly-created Project to highlight it, then click on the + icon, and choose Album Inside... from the popup menu. You are now setup to put images inside your User Collection.

When your images first are copied to the Catalog, usually from a memory card, by default they arrive in Catalog Collections > Recent Imports. Select all of those thumbnails from the last import, and drag them to the Album you created inside of the Project in the User Collections area. You have now successfully organized your first shoot.

Now all you have to do is continue down this path, creating nested Groups as necessary. You might want to add a Smart Album or two at the top of the list in the Group. You can click and drag these elements to place them in any order you want.

So the hierarchy looks something like this:

  • User Collections
  • Top Level Group
  • Nested Group
  • Project
  • Album

I like a clean workspace. I feel like I'm more productive in an organized environment, and the tools in Capture One Pro make that easy.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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I don't think a lot of photographers realize just how easy it is to digitize their film negatives. I'm going to show you the few basic steps that I use with Capture One Pro. My method was inspired by the excellent article, How to Convert Negatives to Positives Using Capture One by Quentin Decaillet.

negative-scanning-web.jpg

First you have to take a picture of your negative and save it as a RAW file. I have a simple setup where I use a macro lens on my Olympus OM-D to photograph a negative on a lightbox. I use a large skylight filter to keep the neg flat while I shoot it. Works great.

scanning-the-neg.jpg

Then I load the RAW file into Capture One Pro. Select the Levels adjuster and invert the dark and light values. It's simple: in the bottom boxes below the graph, enter 255 where 0 is, then enter 0 where 255 was. Save this as a preset. You now have a positive.

levels-adj-web.jpg

At this point, I typically just adjust the luminosity to taste, add a little clarity and sharpening, and call it a day. I tend not to mess with color much because I like the film look supplied by the negatives themselves.

P7181076-TFP016-Scan.jpg SMART Train Dry Run, Santa Rosa, CA - Contax 137 MA in Aperture Priority Mode at f/16. Yashica 42-75mm zoom. Fujicolor Superia 400 expired film. Photos by Derrick Story.

The point is, you can put film negatives to work right away for social and general web publishing. Take a picture, invert the levels, and enjoy.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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One of the new features in Capture One Pro 9.2 is called Create Albums From... It's something that former Aperture users will appreciate, because it allows you to choose a group of thumbnails, right-click on them, and put those shots in an album, on the fly.

For the most part, the tool works well, although I am going to suggest a tweak that I hope they incorporate in future updates. But first, let's see how it works now.

create-album.jpg

Using "Create Albums From"

second-dialog.jpg

Select a group of thumbnails and right-click on them to reveal the popup menu command, Create Albums From. Then choose Selection. You'll see a second dialog box that gives you two choices: "Add selected images after creation" (which seems unnecessary to me, since that's the point of the whole thing) and "Select collection after creation," which opens the album after you make it.

At this point, I expected Capture One to put the new album inside the project I was working in. But instead, it places it at root level. So there's one more step of dragging the new album into the project. Not a big deal, but I think we should have the option to put the new album in its parent project. Maybe in the next update...

Overall, however, this feature is a timesaver. And it's available right now if you update to Capture One Pro 9.2. Being able to create albums on the fly makes it much easier for us to work with sub-groups of images while we're organizing our catalog.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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Just because you left Aperture or Lightroom behind, that doesn't mean that you have to abandon your favorite plugins too. I've been using Silver Efex Pro with Capture One, and the two get along just fine. This also works for other apps/plugins too.

What you might not realize is that, even though you've been using Sliver Efex Pro 2 as a plugin, there's an app in your Applications folder: Applications > Nik Collection > Silver Efex Pro 2.app. Capture One Pro can connect with that app using the Edit With command: Control-Click > Edit With > Silver Efex Pro 2.

01-Edit-With.jpg Start with the Edit With command in Capture One Pro.

Going this route allows you to set up an Edit Recipe, where you can choose between Tiff or Jpeg, color space, resolution, and scale. A new file is created from the original RAW, and it is sent to Silver Efex for work. Here's how to do it.

02-Adjust-SilverEfex.jpg

The Actual Steps

  • In Capture One Pro, start with a RAW file. By doing so, the original image will stay protected.
  • Right-click on the RAW file and select Edit With...
  • Set up the job to your liking, including selecting Silver Efex from the Open With popup menu (see the top illustration). You can choose any of the apps that appear here.
  • Click on the Edit Variant button.
  • Adjust your image in Silver Efex, then click on the Save button.
  • The new Jpeg or Tiff will be returned to your Capture One Pro library.

Tiff-Returned-to-C1P.jpg File retured to Capture One Pro and placed alongside the original.

I've just stared playing with this workflow, so I'm sure there's more to learn. But this should get you pointed in the right direction is you want to continue to use your favorite plugins with Capture One Pro.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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One of the reasons why I continued using Aperture after Apple ceased development, was because I was fond of the plugins I had acquired for it.

As I became more familiar with Capture One Pro, however, I learned that I might not be giving up all that much after all, especially for Black & White photography. Two reasons for that: 1) The Black & White converter image adjustment, and 2) Styles presets.

Black & White Converter Tool

capture-one-bw.jpg

The adjustment sliders for B&W conversion are very good. But the kicker is all of the presets loaded in to the application. So you can browse the different looks, pick one you like, and then fine tune from there. Here's a video on how that works.

As a finishing touch, take a look at the Film Grain tool. There are a variety of great effects there, including my favorite, Silver Rich.

Film Emulation Styles

There are also some wonderful commercially available Styles that you can download, such as Capture One Styles that load a variety of effects right in to your application.

film-styles.jpg

The nice thing about these is that they don't disrupt the RAW workflow. My previous Aperture plugins required that I converted files to TIFFs and then roundtrip them. With Styles, everything stays in RAW and in the host application.

Thanks to these features, I'm discovering that there is indeed, life after Aperture plugins.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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One of the most flexible tools in Capture One Pro is User Styles. I think they're also off the radar for many users. That's too bad because this functionality allows photographers to save a combination of settings and apply them to images as necessary.

user-styles-c1.png

You can use styles to create "your look" for images, apply specific adjustments to portraits and landscapes, and even save them as metadata boilerplates. Take a look at this short movie for an overview on how styles work.

And in addition to the styles you create, you can purchase styles to apply a variety of effects and film emulations to your photographs. Once you enable this secret weapon to your workflow, you'll have a whole new appreciation for the power of Capture One Pro.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I can't be the only photographer who sometimes needs to export just a single image quickly for a web post, then later on send out an entire batch at different resolutions. It all depends on the task at hand, right?

Capture One Pro is quite versatile in this area. There are two distinct ways to export images from your catalog. The first is the actual Export command (File > Export Images), and the second is using the Output tab with its Process Recipes. Take a look at this video for a quick overview of each method.

I tend to use File > Export for those quick tasks when I'm only sending an image or two to the Desktop. But I love having the Output option for the bigger jobs when I want to send images out of the catalog at multiple resolutions, simultaneously.

batch-export-cp1.jpg The Output tab is perfect for bigger export jobs.

This is a terrific system for getting your images out of your catalog and in to clients' hands, social sites, and on your mobile devices.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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The Clarity and Structure tools in Capture One Pro allow you to adjust both fine and coarse detail in your images. There are different algorithms to choose from, so you can use "Natural" for portraits and "Neutral" for objects. And because the sliders are centered positioned, you can both increase and decrease the effect, depending on your subject.

In this training video, I show you how to use Clarity and Structure for both objects and for portraits. I review the different modes so you can see exactly how to get the effect you want for your images.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

clarity-in-c1.png

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

in-aperture-exile.png

Recently, David Grover, business support for Phase One, and myself got together for a conversation about moving from Aperture to Capture One Pro. This falls into line with my thinking that C1 is the logical transition from Aperture for professional and demanding enthusiast photographers.

This one-hour video, that you can watch for free, covers topics such as:

  • Similarities between the two photo management applications.
  • Differences and things I miss from Aperture.
  • New tools in C1 that I wish I had had in Aperture.
  • Tips for new Capture One users.
  • Resources for making the move from Aperture to Capture One.

If you're interested in these topics, you might want to spend your lunch break with us. It's a good conversation that I hope you'll find helpful.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

From Aperture to Capture One Pro

Aperture users still contemplating their next move may want to read my guest post on the Phase One blog titled, Smooth transition from Aperture to Capture One Pro 9.

P8075103-bricks-n-stairs1900-1-1419x946.jpg

I write a bit about why I chose C1, then delve into the test library concept for those who prefer a smooth ride from one photo management app to another. There's also a 35-percent off coupon code for the book, "Capture One Pro 9, Mastering Raw Development, Image Processing, and Asset Management" by Sascha Erni. Not a bad deal at all!

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of the most handsome contact sheet tools I've ever seen was right beneath my nose in Capture One Pro. There are a variety of styles to choose from, and the functionality is smooth and professional looking.

In this short video, I show you exactly how it works and how good looking the final product is.

There are a variety of applications for this tool, including publishing on your web site, creating smart-looking Flash drive galleries, or for client presentations on your laptop. Plus, you can include clickable links to your website and brand the galleries specifically for your business. And they won't look like the stuff that everyone else is creating.

lynda-web-contact-sheet.jpg

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient place.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The latest release of Capture One Pro includes RAW support for seven new cameras:

  • Olympus Pen-F
  • Olympus Olympus Om-D E-M10 Mk II
  • Olympus Sony A68
  • Olympus Sony a6300
  • Olympus Sony RX1R Mk II (revised implementation) • Ricoh GR II
  • Olympus Pentax K-S2

I've been anxious to see how C1 would handle the images from one of my current favorite street cameras, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II. So I cruised Market St. last night to record some RAW for a test. I was not disappointed.

capture-one-9pt1.jpg

This shot was captured at ISO 1250 at f/1.7 with the Panasonic 20mm mounted on the E-M10 Mark II. Shutter speed was 1/40th with exposure compensation at +0.3 and auto white balance. The RAW file rendered in Capture One beautifully. The colors, right out of the camera were rich and saturated. I didn't make any color adjustments at all... just a little contrast and clarity. You can see (and download) a standalone version of the shot on my Flickr account.

This is going to be a wonderful combination, both with the E-M10 Mark II and the PEN-F. I also can't wait to see some shots from the Sony cameras that were added to the list.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

My favorite time to add copyright and contact information for pictures is when I import them. You can do this in Capture One Pro by creating and applying a metadata preset. I've established one that contains my name, copyright, contact city, website, and usage terms. If you'd like to see how that's done, take a look at this instructional video.

Now that I have the metadata preset created, I can apply it during import using Styles. The Styles popup menu is located in the Adjustments area of Capture One's import dialog. Click on it and choose User Presets > Metadata > [your preset].

Apply-Meta-Import.jpg

Your contact information will be added to the images as they are imported. Plus, this setting is sticky, so it should remain enforce for your next import too. There's no better time to add metadata than at the very beginning of the workflow.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

After months or research, testing, and practice, my 5+ hour video training Capture One Pro Essential Training is now available. Here's a taste of what's in store for you.

These movies are designed to show you the easiest ways to make the transition to Capture One. The techniques are straight-forward and uncomplicated. The focus is to get you up and running as quickly as possible, so you can be productive in your new photo management environment. This is a best practices approach.

CaptureOnePro-Promo 1024.jpg

These tutorials will be particularly helpful to former Aperture users looking for a new home, and for unhappy Lightroom photographers who want better RAW decoding and improved performance. I myself made the transition from Aperture to Capture One, and I show you how you can too.

After working with these movies, you might be surprised at just how easy it was to learn this application. Take a look. I think you'll be happy you did.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Among its many processing skills, Capture One Pro is an excellent B&W converter. And thanks to its built-in presets, you can create a beautiful monochrome in just 3 steps.

Step One - Choose a Preset

Choose your image and go to B&W in the Tool Tabs. It's the icon that's box with a diagonal line through it. The list of presets are listed in the B&W pane.

step1-choose-BW-preset.png

Mouse over the list to see how the various options affect your image. Choose your favorite.

Step 2 - Fine Tune Exposure, Clarity, and Grain

Once you've applied the preset, fine tune the image using the other tools in the B&W panel. I like the B&W sliders and Clarity. Exposure and Levels are usually helpful too.

step2-finetune-grain.png

Don't forget to add some grain. It's a wonderful effect and adds a little crispness to the image too.

Export to Your Desktop

Now all you have to do is go to File > Export Images > Variants, then set the parameters and click Export 1 Variant. Your B&W photo will be ready to share.

BW-Austin-1600.jpg

More Capture One Pro Tips

I've published a short tutorial for organizing the User Collections area of your library. Take a look at One Way to Set Up Your Capture One Library. Following those simple techniques will help you add the structure that you crave for your image library.

Capture One Pro Essential Training on lynda.com

Later this month, my new video training titled, Capture One Pro Essential Training will be live on lynda.com. Keep your eyes peeled for my announcement. More than 100 movies that show you the easiest way to master your library, edit files, and output them in a variety of ways.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of the best feelings a photographer can experience is to fire up the computer and quickly find an image from the past. Knowing that you are the master of your image library builds confidence and efficiency.

tina-library-organized.jpg

The first step in Capture One Pro is understanding the difference among the three major sections in the Library pane: Catalog Collections, User Collections, and Folders. Here's a brief explanation of each:

  • Catalog Collections - Controlled by the application using pre-defined filters such as All Images and Recent Imports. This is where your pictures enter the database when imported from a memory card.
  • User Collections - Controlled by you, providing the tools to build a library structure that's consistent with your sense of organization. You can create Groups (that act like folders in Aperture), Projects, and Albums.
  • Folders - Shows the location of your masters, whether they're in the C1 catalog container, or outside the application set up as a referenced catalog.

I've published a short tutorial for organizing the User Collections area of your library. Take a look at One Way to Set Up Your Capture One Library. Following those simple techniques will help you add the structure that you crave for your image library.

Capture One Pro Essential Training on lynda.com

Later this month, my new video training titled, Capture One Pro Essential Training will be live on lynda.com. Keep your eyes peeled for my announcement. More than 100 movies that show you the easiest way to master your library, edit files, and output them in a variety of ways.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.