Recently in TDS SoundBites

Olympus has created the camera that many of us were hoping for: The intelligence and speed of the E-M1X in a more compact form factor. Nimble Photographers, meet the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III. Listen-in for my thoughts after working with this camera in Costa Rica.

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The E-M1 Mark III uses the same battery, grip, and of course lenses as the Mark II (yay!), but you get the brawn of the E-M1X including:

  • Up to 7.5 shutter speed steps of compensation.
  • 121-point all cross-type on-chip Phase Detection AF sensor for high-precision focusing.
  • Starry Sky AF delivers revolutionary autofocus performance for astrophotography (and it works handheld as well as on a tripod).
  • Advanced Face/Eye Priority AF tracks and ensures the subject's eye is continuously in focus.
  • Advanced weatherproof construction, resulting in dustproof, splashproof, and freezeproof performance.
  • The SSWF (Super Sonic Wave Filter) vibrates the image sensor at a frequency of 30,000 times per second to shake off dust and dirt. The new dust resistant coating recently introduced on the OM-D E-M1X is also used on this model, making it less likely for dust and dirt to stick to the image sensor, reducing spots in images by 90 percent.
  • Long-life shutter unit rated for 400,000 actuations. It offers a high level of reliability that professional photographers can feel comfortable with.
  • OM-D Movie makes handheld 4K/C4K shooting possible due to a powerful image stabilization mode specifically designed for video recording (M-IS1). This offers three levels of performance to allow handheld 4K and Cinema 4K (C4K) high resolution shooting.
  • New image processing engine, TruePic IX paired with a 20.4 MP 4/3" Live MOS sensor.
  • Improved AF algorithms and high resolution, high speed performance allow for features such as Handheld High Res Shot, Live ND (which is truly amazing), Starry Sky AF and improved face/eye priority AF.
  • And much, much more.

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Pricing and Availability

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III (black) will be available beginning February 24, 2020. The camera body only will have a suggested retail price of $1,799.99 USD and $2,399.99 CAD. The camera body bundled with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm F2.8 PRO Lens will have a suggested retail price of $2,499.99 USD and $3,299.99 CAD, and the camera body bundled with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100 F4.0 IS PRO Lens will have a suggested retail price of $2,899.99 USD and $3,799.99 CAD.

Stay tuned for a lot more about this camera and the new 12-45mm f/4 PRO lens also announced today. I'll be sharing pictures and field experiences with this gear.

For more TDS SoundBites, visit TheDigitalStory, and enter "Soundbites" into the search field at the top of the page. They will magically appear on your device.

Technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

Previously on TDS SoundBites

Capture Flowing Water with Your iPhone.

In-Camera RAW Processing.

Slow Sync Flash.

Business Card Flash Modifier.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

A favorite shot for most outdoor photographers is a beautiful flowing stream captured with a long exposure.

In the past, we needed a tripod and a fair amount of gear to make one of these images. But today's iPhone makes it so much easier. You have two ways to go.

The first is to turn on Live View for your Camera app on the iPhone, and hold the device very steady during the exposure. Then, go to edit mode in your Photos app on the Mac, and choose Long Exposure from the Live View popup menu in the lower right corner. Your image will magically transform.

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The second option is to download the iOS app called Spectre. It specializes in these types of images, and it provides more options for their capture.

Either way, you have to give one of these a try the next time you're around moving water. They are simply mind-blowing!

For more TDS SoundBites, visit TheDigitalStory, and enter "Soundbites" into the search field at the top of the page. They will magically appear on your device.

Technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

Previously on TDS SoundBites

In-Camera RAW Processing.

Slow Sync Flash.

Business Card Flash Modifier.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

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I love the look of bounce flash. Using the ceiling as a giant diffuser really creates a mood that I can't get with direct flash.

The only problem is, if you're shooting people, this technique can make their eyes go dark because the flash illumination is coming from directly above. There is an easy solution, however: The business card flash modifier.

You should be carrying photographer business cards with you anyway. When you design yours, make sure that the back is white for jotting notes or for using a a flash modifier.

Point the flash head upward to the ceiling, rubber band the white side your business card to the head so that it diverts some of the light directly toward the subject. Now you have the best of both worlds: soft bounce lighting with a illuminated face of your subject.

For more TDS SoundBites, visit TheDigitalStory, and enter "Soundbites" into the search field at the top of the page. They will magically appear on your device.

Technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

Previously on TDS SoundBites

In-Camera RAW Processing.

Slow Sync Flash.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Slow Sync Flash - TDS SoundBites

Outdoors, we typically want our shutter speed as fast as possible when using flash so our camera can better balance the bright ambient lighting with the illuminated subject.

DSCF1764.jpg Slow Sync Flash with a FujiFilm XF10. The camera set the shutter speed to 1/10th of a second, while using flash to freeze the action in the foreground. This was all done automatically in Slow Sync Flash mode. Photo by Derrick Story.

But indoor flash photography is a different animal all together. And many times our cameras will default to 1/60th or 1/125th shutter speed in Program mode, which is just too fast to capture the interior environment for our images.

This is when slow-sync flash is handy, and I explain it in today's TDS Soundbite.

Technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

Previously on TDS SoundBites

In-Camera RAW Processing.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

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Today's TDS SoundBite discusses in-camera RAW processing and how it can speed up your quality publishing to social and provide quick turnaround for clients. Many photographers overlook this valuable feature on their DSLR and mirrorless cameras. I'm thinking that you might want to take a second look.

What is it, exactly? This workflow allows you to capture in RAW only. Then go through your images in-camera and select the ones that you might want to share. When you choose a picture to process (in camera), go to the RAW Edit menu, adjust color, brightness, etc., then save it as a Jpeg copy. You can now send it out of camera to your smartphone and share it with the world.

Listen in to find out more about in-camera RAW Processing...

Technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.