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This is The Digital Story Podcast #572, Feb. 21, 2017. Today's theme is "1Frame4Nature with Alexandra Garcia ." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

After the WildSpeak Conference last November in Washington D.C., I had quite a few inquires about the best ways to get involved with conservation photography. I guess I wasn't the only one. So the folks at ILCP came up with 1Frame4Nature, and it's the perfect way to have your images published right alongside pro conservation photographers. And that's the lead story in today's TDS podcast.

1Frame4Nature with Alexandra Garcia

I met Alex Garcia last summer during her visit to California. During our interview, I was excited to learn just how accessible conservation photography can be. And as a result, I traveled to Washington D.C. in the Fall to cover the WildSpeak Conference.

PB165461-Washington-DCWildspeak-tds.jpg Conservation photographer Lucas Bustamonte presenting at WildSpeak 2016.

That event generated a lot of interest among those who want to use their photography skills to help protect our planet. And as a result, the 1Frame4Nature was conceived.

So Alex and I decided to team up for another interview to provide you with the inside scoop about this project. I hope you enjoy, and think about, what she has to say.

In the News

Canon debuts EOS M6 mirrorless with optional EVF (via DPReview):

Canon's newest mirrorless camera, the EOS M6, is a replacement for the entry-level EOS M3 and slides in directly under the enthusiast M5 (confused yet?).

It shares essentially all of the M5's internal components, including the 24MP APS-C sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF, Digic 7 processor and 3" touchscreen. It's also capable of 1080/60p video capture and has Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth.

Differentiating factors between are limited to the built-in EVF on the M5 and the flip-up selfie screen on the M6. The M6 gains an additional top plate control dial compared to the M3, which should improve handling.

Canon also announced an optional EVF (the EVF-DC2) for use with the M6. This 2.36M-dot EVF is smaller and lighter than the EVF-DC1 used by the M3, but do note that it does not tilt upward.

The Canon EOS M6 will go on sale in April 2017 in both black and silver. It will sell for $780 body-only, with the EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $900 or with the EF-M 18-150mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $1280. The EVF-DC2 is priced at $250 and also comes in black and silver.

Speaking of Canon...

Yesterday on The Nimble Photographer, I posted Canon: It's been a Good Run, the story about my selling the 5D Mark II and replacing it with then brand new Pentax KP DSLR with a Pentax DA 20-40mm f/2.8-4 ED Limited DC WR zoom lens. It's the end of an era for me...

Dates Set for the Northern CA Coast Tour Workshop

Good news for those wishing to join us for a tour up the Northern CA Coast. We've set the dates for this event: May 18-20th, 2017. Originally, we were planning this as a summer workshop. But after working with experts who actually live in the areas that we'll be working, we moved the event to late May. This provides us with Spring weather and far cheaper room accommodations.

Those of you on the Reserve List will receive your personal invites later this week. You will have 10 days to secure your spot before we open up the event to the general public. If you're not on the reserve list, and would like to be, please visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #571, Feb. 14, 2017. Today's theme is "The Home Studio: Easier than You Think." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As much as I love outdoor portraiture, some shoots are just better inside. Wardrobe changes are easier, lighting is controllable, and the temperature is far more comfortable. And if you do product photography too, a home studio becomes a necessity. But how much room and equipment do you need to have a functional workspace? Probably less than you realize. And that's what I'm going to discuss in today's show.

P2106268-Brittney-orginal.jpg "Brittney" by Derrick Story. Unretouched portrait (no image editing other than a crop) captured at Sunleaf Studio with OM-D E-M5 Mark II and Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 zoom lens.

The Home Studio: Easier than You Think

One of the aspects of having a studio workspace is that it's there waiting for you whenever inspiration strikes. And when you're finished shooting, you can just close the door and tidy up later. Half of my photography happens in this environment.

A lot of folks believe that such a space is expensive. And that the room needs a lot of modification. But this just hasn't been the case for me. And to help you with your considerations about such an endeavor, I'm going to take you behind the scenes of my shooting room. Here's a photo of my working space.

  • How Much Space? - The room I use is a standard bedroom that measures 11'x10', with a north facing window. I did swap out the sliding closet doors with mirror door, which photo subjects really like because they can follow how they look during the shoot. The walls are painted flat white, providing me with a bright, airy feeling. If I want to change the mood, I can always close the blinds and work with just supplemental lighting.
  • What About Backdrops? - When I first set up the studio, I constructed my backdrop frame out of PVC pipe. Later, I bought a backdrop stand for less than $75, and it's great. I use muslin and roll paper for my backdrops. And with the stand system, it's easy to change the backdrop during the shoot if I want.
  • Do I Need Expensive Lights? - I started with simple off-camera speedlights. But when the price of LED lighting dropped, I switched completely to those. I love LEDs because I can control both the intensity and color temperature. Plus, the constant light makes exposure and composition very easy. And they are cool too.
  • What Type of Modifiers Work Best? Since I have a north facing window, sometimes I just that light only with a couple reflectors. This is one of my favorite lighting schemes because it's so beautiful and natural. But I also use inexpensive soft boxes and umbrellas.
  • Do I Need a Lot of Hardware? - Light stands are essential to help you position the lights exactly where you want them. And the good news is, they last forever. You'll also need a variety of clamps and light holders. Most of use just start with the basics, then add on over time. I've been adding to my collection for more than 20 years.

If you can't swing a dedicated room for your studio work, a shared space can work quite well. The main thing to consider is, can you keep the clutter in check? I have tables and cabinets around the edges of the room. But the central area remains open, providing enough space for my shoots.

In the News

Nikon reports "extraordinary loss", "fundamental company-wide restructuring" (via NikonRumors):

In addition to canceling the DL line of premium compact cameras, Nikon also issued several statements describing "extraordinary loss", "fundamental company-wide restructuring" and a revision of their last financial forecast.

  • Nikon Corp. reported a net loss to owners of the parent of 831 million yen or 2.10 yen per share for the nine months ended December 31, 2016 compared to profit of 18.71 billion yen or 47.08 yen per share, previous year.
  • In accordance with the restructuring announced on November 8, 2016, the Group recorded extraordinary loss of 29.79 billion yen, mainly incurred from inventory write-downs/write-off in Semiconductor Lithography Business, as restructuring expenses for the nine months ended December 31, 2016.
  • Nine-month operating income increased by 67.1% year on year to 42.18 billion yen, and ordinary income increased by 42.5% year on year to 44.79 billion yen.
  • Nine-month net sales were 565.89 billion yen compared to 616.50 billion yen, a year ago.

Dates Set for the Northern CA Coast Tour Workshop

Good news for those wishing to join us for a tour up the Northern CA Coast. We've set the dates for this event: May 18-20th, 2017. Originally, we were planning this as a summer workshop. But after working with experts who actually live in the areas that we'll be working, we moved the event to late May. This provides us with Spring weather and far cheaper room accommodations.

Those of you on the Reserve List will receive your personal invites later this week. You will have 10 days to secure your spot before we open up the event to the general public. If you're not on the reserve list, and would like to be, please visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact. You can learn more here.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Deanne-Headshot-web.jpg

This is The Digital Story Podcast #570, Feb. 7, 2017. Today's theme is "Building Trust with Your Subjects." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The profession of photojournalism is changing, as is media in general. How do photographers find their voice in a world where social media and citizen reporting compete for viewer's attention, alongside established news outlets such as the San Francisco Chronicle and the Washington Post? Fortunately, Pulitzer Prize honored photographer Deanne Fitzmaurice took time out from her busy schedule to discuss these very issues with me. And I think you'll be fascinated by what she has to say.

Visit deannefitzmaurice.com to see more of Deanne's work. And don't forget to follow Deanne on Instagram too.

Lily Deanne Shoulder Bags

Senior product designer, Lily Fisher and Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, Deanne Fitzmaurice, collaborated to design the ideal bag for professional female photographers.

With room for pro-size lenses and hoods, your gear will feel right at home and at your fingertips. Extensive pockets and compartments make this camera bag as functional as it is fashionable. You can learn more about the bags here.

Updates and Such

Registration for the The Chicago to New Orleans Rail Adventure - June 26-29, 2017, and for the San Francisco Street Photography Workshop - is now open to the public. You can see the details for each event by visiting the Official TDS Workshops Registration Page.

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #569, Jan. 31, 2017. Today's theme is "Plugins: Cake and Eat it Too." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The phrase, "You can't have your cake and eat it too," refers to telling someone that they can't have two good things that don't normally go together at the same time, like eating a cake and then continuing to possess that same cake so you can eat later*. An exception to this rule in the world of photography is with our photo management apps and plugins. I explain more in today's show.

* as written by Jacob Shamsian of the Business Insider.

Plugins: Cake and Eat it Too

On one hand, we want continuity with our photo management applications. So whether you're using Lightroom, Photos for macOS, Capture One Pro, or something else, you want to know that your photos are safe and retrievable.

But at the same time, this is also our digital darkroom where we fine tune, experiment, and test new approaches to get the most our of our imagery. For these activities we want new tools and filters that fuel our creativity. And to be honest, new tools don't come fast in photo management applications.

A way that we can have both security and creativity is through the use of plugins. We don't have to give up our stable photo management system to experiment with new image editing tools. So I thought that I would share three interesting plugins with you today.

on1-Photo-RAW-web.jpg

On1 Photo RAW

Available for both Mac and Windows. No catalog means you (or anyone with access) can store and edit your photos anywhere (local network and cloud). Built-in layers, brushes, and masking tools. Includes all of the ON1 apps; Browse, Develop, Effects, Portrait, Layers, Resize, and Photo Via Works as a standalone app, as a plug-in (for Adobe® Photoshop® and Lightroom®), a host app (Google® Nik® and other apps), or as an extension (for Apple® Photos®).

I'm most interested in Photo RAW as a complement to Photos for macOS. But I think it's useful as a Lightroom plugin too. I downloaded the trial, and went for a test drive.

Bottom line was that Photo RAW worked well for Lightroom with smooth handoffs back and forth. But as an editing extension for Photos for macOS, it crashed Photos and didn't work. On1 Photo RAW is available for $99.

Luminar

No surprise here, I'm sure, that Luminar is at the top of this list. Mac users who rely on Lightroom, Aperture, or Photos for macOS, can expand their post processing chops with an array of sophisticated filters, layers, and localized editing brushes. You can purchase Luminar for $69 that includes the full set of plugins with a standalone version of the app.

DxO Film Pack

Available as a plugin for Lightroom, Photoshop, and Aperture 3, or as a standalone app. Mac and Windows compatible. In Lightroom you need to set it up as your additional external editor in Preferences. Once doing so, the roundtrip is painless, and the adjusted image is returned to Lightroom in a stack with the original.

This plugin gives access to more than 80 analogue films, and combines many original renderings with filter, vignetting, blur, texture, frame or light leak effects.

I really like these film emulations, and the fact that it is an excellent RAW processor at the same time. You can purchase versions starting at $79.

In the News: Advanced Editing Extensions from lynda.com

This is a very cool training from lynda.com: Photos for macOS: Advanced Editing Extensions. I show you how to use Luminar, DxO Optics Pro, Pixelmator, Affinity Photo, and Polarr. I cover standalone versus editing extension, and how to blend all of these tools into a creative, easy to use workflow.

Updates and Such

The registration forms for the The Chicago to New Orleans Rail Adventure - June 26-29, 2017, and for the San Francisco Street Photography Workshop - have been sent out to members of our reserve list. This workshop begins the day after Out of Chicago concludes. So if you're going to OOC, just add Sunday night to your hotel reservation if you plan on joining us. You can still get on the reserve list for this event, and for our others, by visiting the TDS Workshops Page and using the Send Me Info form on that page. I'm going to open both of these workshops to the general public soon. So if you're on the reserve list, and want to go, I would sign up soon.

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #568, Jan. 24, 2017. Today's theme is "Why Churchill's Portrait was Burned." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When a subject allows us to photograph them, they are putting their hearts in our hands. And the decisions that we, the photographer, make in those moments together bear great weight on the final outcome. Is our goal to solely please the subject? Do we have a responsibility to integrate our own artistic vision into the work? Or should we ignore the desires of others and portray what we believe to be honest? I grapple with these questions in today's show.

Why Churchill's Portrait was Burned

blazing-fire.jpg

For Winston Churchill's 80th birthday, House of Commons and House of Lords commissioned a formal portrait by modern painter Graham Sutherland. The painting showed Churchill seated in a chair with his hands resting on its arms with him slightly slumped and portrayed in dark wintery tones.

Churchill hated the painting. Sutherland argued that he had painted what he honestly saw. During its public unveiling, Churchill quipped that it was, "a remarkable example of modern art."

The painting was never hung in public. And as the story goes, it was hidden away in the cellar of their Chartwell estate... until in the middle of one unparticular night, it was smuggled out and burned.

Years later, when Sutherland learned of the destruction of his work, he is claimed to have said, "without question an act of vandalism."

So who was right? Winston Churchill, who had tried to guide the artist toward a more flattering portrayal, but upon failing to do so, chose to destroy the work? Or Graham Sutherland, who despite pressure from his subject, stuck to his beliefs that his responsibility was to show the famous statesman as he truly looked in his 80th year?

I think the question comes down to what is honesty, and does it only exist on the exterior? Or should we as artists consider the human being beneath the surface when making our choices on how to portray them?

In the News

Fujifilm X100F steps up to 24.3MP, adds AF joystick. Fujifilm is taking the wraps off the X100F, the fourth generation of its popular enthusiast-focused compact series. It updates the house that the X100 built with a 24.3MP X-Trans III APS-C sensor and X-Processor Pro image processor borrowed from the X-T2.

Changes can also be seen on the top and rear panels of the camera - notably, an AF joystick makes its first appearance on the X100 series. Other controls have been shifted to the right of the LCD, and up top the shutter speed dial has been modified to include ISO controls. A front control dial has also been added. The hybrid viewfinder has also been updated, and now offers image magnification when using the electronic rangefinder mode.

The Fujifilm X100F will be available February 16th in black or silver for $1299/£1249. (As reported by DPReview.com).

87% of UK Freelance Photogs Asked to Work for Free in 2016; 16% Said Yes

The issue of businesses asking photographers to work for free has been a hot issue in recent years, and now we have some citable statistics that shed more light on it. According to a new study in the UK, 87% of photographers were asked to work for free in 2016, and 16% said yes.

The research was conducted by the UK startup Approve.io, which surveyed 1,009 part-time and full-time freelancers in the UK who have taken on freelance contracts over the past 5 years.

The study "reveals an alarming trend for corporate 'entitlement' when it comes to how freelance professionals are treated," Approve.io tells PetaPixel.

You can read the entire story on Petapixel.

Updates and Such

The registration forms for the The Chicago to New Orleans Rail Adventure - June 26-29, 2017 - have been sent out to members of our reserve list. This workshop begins the day after Out of Chicago concludes. So if you're going to OOC, just add Sunday night to your hotel reservation if you plan on joining us. You can still get on the reserve list for this event, and for our others, by visiting the TDS Workshops Page and using the Send Me Info form on that page.

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #567, Jan. 17, 2017. Today's theme is "Beyond Pretty Pictures." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When I first started teaching photography and writing books on the subject, the focus was how to tame your camera, make it see the world the way your eyes do. In other words, how to overcome the technical challenges of photography. That knowledge, plus my people skills, was also at the heart of my commercial work. But times have changed, and photographers have to find new ways to distinguish themselves from the pack. And that's the focus of today's show.

Beyond Pretty Pictures

It wasn't that long ago that people were mystified by camera settings. They really had no idea how to capture good color and exposures in the varying lighting conditions of day to day life. So when I would talk about exposure compensation, spot metering, white balance, and aperture settings, there was a large audience interested in what I had to say.

But computers have changed all of that. And I'm not talking about your trusty laptop, but the sophisticated computer that's inside your camera and your smartphone. And as a result, just about anyone can take a pretty picture.

Kaanapali, Maui.jpg

So where does that leave us who are passionate about the art and craft of photography? How do we distinguish ourselves from snapshooters who believe they can take our place? Here are a few ideas.

  • Composition: The Last Frontier - It's true that anyone can get good color and exposure consistently, but the computer doesn't instruct you what to shoot. And this is an area where you can excel.
  • Post Processing: Pimp Your Shots - I'm often amazed when I see an unfinished image on Instagram, especially with all the great filters and adjustments available in the Instagram app. And those pale in comparison to what we can do in Lightroom or Luminar on our computers. Improving our post processing chops can still help us elevate our game.
  • Lens Selection: Optical Prowess - Yes, the iPhone 7 Plus can emulate a telephoto lens for portraits, but interchangeable lens cameras still provide us with amazing optical diversity that just can't be matched on a smartphone.
  • Perspective: Going High and Low - If you watch people take pictures, they almost always stand the same way and shoot from the same angle. By getting up high and going very low, we can dramatically alter the feel for the shot.
  • Subject Selection: Expose a Different World - It's easy to stay in a comfort zone. But what if you explored an entirely new subject for your work?

In the News

Nikon launches 100th Anniversary Website. On July 25, 2017, Nikon will be celebrating its centennial anniversary. To honor that milestone, they've launched an anniversary site that features movies and an historical timeline. It's a fairly elaborate affair, but 100 years is a tremendous accomplishment.

The Best Podcasts for Photography Lovers & Creatives

Photography is an art form, a thoughtful process, and way to focus your creative energy as well as preserve memories. Though it may seem counterintuitive at first to listen to a podcast on such a visual subject, photography podcasts are an amazing outlet for budding (and more seasoned) photographers to learn and develop their craft, as well as keep up with new photo trends.

As lovers of both, we put together a shortlist of our favorite photography podcasts -- you can record and save them all using Replay Radio, and listen to them anywhere on-the-go, armed with your best photography gear.

  • Photography Tips from the Top Floor
  • The Candid Frame
  • Martin Bailey Photography Podcast
  • The Digital Story
  • Thoughts on Photography

You can read more by visiting The Best Podcasts for Photography Lovers & Creatives on the Applian site.

Updates and Such

The registration forms for the The Chicago to New Orleans Rail Adventure - June 26-29, 2017 - are about ready to go out to members of our reserve list. This workshop begins the day after Out of Chicago concludes. So if you're going to OOC, just add Sunday night to your hotel reservation if you plan on joining us. You can still get on the reserve list for this event, and for our others, by visiting the TDS Workshops Page and using the Send Me Info form on that page.

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #566, Jan. 10, 2017. Today's theme is "10 Questions I Asked Myself in Las Vegas." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

If you've read my latest Nimble Photographer Journal entry, you know that I was a bit underwhelmed with CES this year. And I found myself muttering these questions as I roamed the hallways of Mandalay Bay and the Las Vegas Convention Center. So I thought you might find them interesting.

10 Questions I Asked Myself in Las Vegas

This year's show was more renovation than innovation, IMHO. I mean, I like kitchen remodels as well as the next guy. But I don't usually travel to Las Vegas to experience them firsthand. Here are a few questions, with answers, that passed through my mind during the week.

Las-Vegas-train-station.jpeg

  • Why doesn't my monorail pass work? - Great high tech idea: My prepaid monorail pass will be combined with my CES pass so that I'll have one easy to use badge for everything. Problem is, not only didn't my monorail pass work, I may or may not see a refund for my prepayment.
  • Where the heck is Olympus? - After not hearing a peep from them before the show, I wrote my contact and asked. Olympus decided to sit this out. They must of knew something that I didn't before the show.
  • Is Lyft as Good as Uber? - Since I didn't have a functional monorail pass, I decided to take advantage of the $5 per ride credit that Lyft was offering. I hadn't used them before, and was curious about their service. Bottom line: they are every bit as good as Uber.
  • What happened to the Canon booth? - One place that I could always count on for lots to do at CES was the Canon booth. This year I felt like they were jobbed out to a 3rd party vendor.
  • When did AT&T fix its network? - About half way through the show, it dawned on me that my phone had been working the entire time. This is quite a feat in a venue with thousands of connected geeks.
  • Why doesn't Panasonic get more credit for being great? - One of the bright spots of the week was the great offerings by Panasonic. Not only did they show off the wonderful GH-5, but they updated a number of their lenses. And this was only one small area of their display. Seems like Panasonic should get more respect...
  • Is it worth switching to Fuji just for the Titanium XT-2? - As if this camera didn't look hot enough already!.
  • Are we seeing comebacks from Polaroid and Kodak? - Unlike some of the other Polaroid cameras of late, the Pop looks like a quality device. And Kodak is finding a voice again with a second generation Super 8 and the revival of Ektachrome.
  • Is there no limit to what people will endure for a free lunch? - I can't believe what the press corps tolerates just for a dry sandwich.
  • Is it possible to attend CES and not come home with a cold? - Apparently not!

In the News

DJI reportedly takes majority stake in Hasselblad. "DJI is reported to have acquired a majority share in Hasselblad, according to an article posted January 4 on Luminous Landscape. We asked DJI's Corporate Communication Director of North America, Adam Lisberg, about the reports and he declined to comment. It's telling, however, that DJI isn't making an effort to deny the reports."

"The initial report from LL, written by Kevin Raber, recounts the history of Hasselblad from the company's aerial beginnings to the announcement of the X1D system. Raber speculates that unexpectedly high demand for the X1D forced Hasselblad to look for funding to produce the camera."

Thanks to DPreview.com.

Fisheye in Vegas

If you follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook, you may have noticed that I was relying heavily on my newish Rokinon 7.5mm f/3.5 Fisheye Lens during this trip. The bigness of Las Vegas seemed like a natural subject for this optic. And I have to tell you, I loved shooting with it last week. More about my adventures with it in this segment of the show.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #565, Jan. 3, 2017. Today's theme is "Something To Look Forward To." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Have you ever had a friend tell you, "I just want to get something on the books. I like having things to look forward to."? It's a very human emotion. In a lot of ways, I think it's an expression of hope. And it's a concept that applies well to our photography too, as I will discuss in today's show.

Something To Look Forward To

When we're standing at the threshold of a new year, most strive to make the 12 months ahead better than those in the rear view mirror. And one of the ways that we can do that is plan for activities that will bring goodness to our lives.

An area that's rich with possibilities for us is our photography. It offers so many opportunities in a variety of ways, a few of which I'm going to cover right now.

surf-bug.jpg

  • Enter a Photo Competition - Few things feel better to a photographer than having an image earn a top prize. In addition to all of the attention, and possible financial rewards, it is a solid affirmation that we are improving in our craft. But there are other benefits to this activity too...
  • Save For, then Purchase, a New Camera - This is different than slapping an impulse buy on your credit card. Instead, make this a project where you identify the gear that you desire, create a plan to save for it, then purchase it once the funds have been secured. Not only will you have the elation of a new camera or lens, but the satisfaction of designing a business project and accomplishing your goals.
  • Plan a Photography Vacation - There are so many benefits to getting out of your own backyard and exploring a different part of the country with your camera. In addition to the pictures you capture, you will meet new people, taste different foods, and broaden your understanding of the world. The good feelings will begin right away with putting your name on a reserve list or booking the flight.
  • Volunteer Your Services - There are so many areas that could use skilled photographers, but don't know how to find them or can't afford them: the local food bank, churches, schools, and amateur sports teams, just to name a few. If you line up a project for one such entity, imagine how good it feels to say, "Yeah, I'm going to be the photographer for that little leagues baseball team this summer."

In the News

An Update on Brides Magazine's Insistence That Pros Shoot Canon or Nikon. "Brides approached Matsuura with an article proposition: providing couples a guide for choosing a photographer. In response to the question "Besides the quality and style of photographs, what else should brides be thinking about?", Matsuura proposed a series of more detailed questions, one of which was: "What type of equipment do you use?" In addition to the proposed questions, Matsuura offered hypothetical answers that a photographer might give a client in an effort to further illustrate the type of interactions a couple might expect with a potential photographer. These hypothetical answers included the controversial assertion that professionals use either Canon or Nikon cameras."

What she wrote was: "Your photographer should know their equipment. Canon and Nikon are the most readily used cameras, but there are many other well-known professional cameras out there. Whatever your photographer does choose, it's good to make sure that he/she is well versed in their equipment."

But it was changed to: "Ideally, your photographer would use the most readily available professional camera."

Thanks to FStoppers.com.

Do You Have an Old Pentax DSLR?

I have some terrific Pentax-F and Pentax-FA lenses that I would like to compare on digital sensors to the film cameras I'm testing. If you have an older Pentax DSLR that you're not use and willing to sell affordably, please drop me a line at: derrick@thedigitalstory.com

CES is This Week

Most likely, by the time you hear this podcast, I will be in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show. That means I'll be reporting during the week, and will have a special podcast for you next week.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #564, Dec. 27, 2016. Today's theme is "Two Near Misses and a Hit." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The funny thing about life is that you can be rolling along just fine, then out of nowhere, everything is turned upside down. This week's show features two such incidents that result in a happy ending, plus one case where a good situation was made even better, thanks to technology. I hope you enjoy the show.

Two Near Misses and a Hit

Most of the time we're complaining about technology. The crashing computer that loses an hour's worth of work, dreadfully slow WiFi at a hotel, and dropped calls in the middle of an important conversation are all frustrating examples.

But sometimes our robotic companions can save the day, or at least vastly improve it. And I have three such stories that have happened to me recently.

  • Drobo to the Rescue - I was riding back to the studio on my bike when the phone rang. I wasn't able to answer it in time, but the ensuing voicemail became the cry for help. A client needed a high rez version of an image I had shot for them two years ago, and they needed it in an hour. Here's how my backup drive saved the day.
  • venice-beach.jpg

  • Exit Now! - We were driving on the 405 in Southern California one evening when our navigation unexpected urged us to exit on Harbor Blvd., even though that was a few miles from our destination. In a split second I decided to obey. And what followed saved our entire evening.
  • Family Bonding - Large family gatherings during the holidays are unpredictable events at best. Every person that walks through the front door has a year's worth of ups and downs resting on their shoulders. And you just never know how the batter is going to bake. But this year, thanks to my Olympus camera, WiFi, and the iPhone, we were all able to share a moment that made everything else pale in comparison.

In the News

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017. I strongly encourage everyone to give a 365 project a try. Even if you aren't in a rut creatively, it'll help you explore new avenues for your work. I also recommend having some sort of theme to give direction. For instance, I've decided that the final images will be in a 2.35:1 widescreen aspect ratio to aid my composition in my short film work, even though I'm shooting a still photography camera. My photography, editing, and filmmaking will all see something from this project. Have you tried a 365 project? I'd love to hear from your experiences. Thanks to FStoppers.com.

Review The Apple Photos Book for Photographers

I have two more review copies of The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, and if you'd like to be a reviewer, drop me a note at derrick@thedigitalstory.com. First come, first served.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #563, Dec. 20, 2016. Today's theme is "My Attack on 2017." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I was sipping whiskey with a friend last night, and he said to me, "I'm so sick of scandals, politics, and power plays. I'm going to forget about all of that and focus on my family, craft, and self improvement in 2017. Afterwards, I was thinking, you know, that's not a bad idea. And so I've begun my attack on 2017.

My Attack on 2017

IMG_2830.jpg

Maybe I was too distracted by external events in 2016. The topsy turvy stock market, an agonizing presidential race, Brexit, race tensions, middle east bloodshed, and a general lack of appreciation in the workplace.

As a result, I think it's time for a little recalibration. And the adjustments that I'm going to focus on are going to be putting more energy into those closest to me, and into my craft.

I might not be able to influence our dealings with Russia, but I sure as heck have a say in how I approach the things and people I love. And if you feel the same way, here's a starting checklist for working on upping your photography game.

  • Photo Management Software - There are some great choices out there, and that's right, none of them are perfect. Lightroom is at the top of the heap, Capture One has serious asset management chops, Photos for macOS is deceptively clever, and OnOne RAW is the newcomer. Decide which ones of these come closest to meeting your needs, set up your library, and move forward.
  • Back it Up - If you do not have every single photo you captured in 2016 backed up, you're playing with fire. I'm using iCloud and a pair of Drobo 5Ds for my work. The system is running, working, and allows me to keep my eyes focused forward instead of worrying about what's in the rear view mirror.
  • Nail Down Your Kit - I'm a mirrorless photographer who also likes to shoot 35mm film. So when I pack for a trip, I know the bag I need, pick the right lenses, and go shoot pictures. I don't really need any new gear in 2017. I'm pretty happy with what I have. If something new comes out that fits within mirrorless or film, I'll consider it. But I'm probably not going to spend a lot of time thinking about equipment.
  • Put More Energy into Personal Projects - One of my best lessons from 2016 was the value of personal projects. In my case, the rediscovery of film has energized all of my shooting. And I plan on allocating my time in 2017 for my personal work.
  • Start Something New- As you heard last week, not every new idea is successful. But even the failures are satisfying in the sense that I go to sleep at night feeling like I'm in the game; I'm creating new stuff; and I'm not going to let myself be put in a box. If your day job sucks, then this becomes even more important.

In the News

Fast, flexible and powerful RAW editor: ON1 Photo RAW 2017 launches, available now. " "ON1 Photo RAW 2017 is tuned for today's sensors and graphics chips. It opens 50-megapixel images in a fraction of a second on a standard PC or Mac, and performs edits in real-time, without slider lag or frustrating waits for redraw." The software is built around ON1 Browse, the company's photo browser. Similarly, Photo RAW does not require users to build a library or catalog of their images, but instead integrates ON1 Browse, allowing fast tagging, rating and adjusting. Without relying on a local catalog, photographers can edit photos that are stored in the cloud or on external servers and the software even allows for colleagues to pick up where you left off, or vice versa." Thanks to Imaging-Resource.com.

San Francisco Street Photography Workshop

April 6-9, 2017 - We'll work entirely on location in San Francisco. We'll book a hotel in picturesque Union Square that will serve as our headquarters during the event. No rental car will be necessary. We'll explore the City's hidden treasures and capture them through our lenses. And we're adding new shooting locations again this year, including twilight assignments. This is San Francisco like you've never seen it before. And as a bonus, Olympus Trailblazer Mike Boening will be joining the teaching staff and leading sessions on street shooting and night photography. Two instructors, three days, and all for just $695. (That's right, it's 3 full days in one of the most photogenic cities in the U.S.)

Visit the TDS Workshops page for more information and to get on the reserve list.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.