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Photography is both my hobby and a substantial revenue stream. I once kept both worlds in the same application (Aperture), but over the last couple years, I've separated my personal work from what I shoot for hire.

Capture-One-Wildspeak.jpg

Technology has had much to do with this. In 2012, for example, I shot just about everything with the same camera. iPhones weren't as good, Cloud sharing not as robust, and my workflow was essentially to remove the card from the camera, insert it into my Mac, and load everything into Aperture.

But 2017 is much different. I love shooting my day to day life with the iPhone, Olympus TG-4, and a variety of 35mm film cameras. The digital images flow right into my Photos for iOS and macOS apps, and they're instantly available to share, print, and post. It's easy and enjoyable. I've never been happier as a hobbyist.

My professional jobs involve higher resolution cameras, bigger files, larger quantities for each session, multiple export options, and serving as an archive for my clients. And for this work, Capture One Pro 10 has become my go-to app. Here are five reasons why.

Old School Organization

The tools for catalog management include projects, albums, groups (the equivalent of folders in Aperture), and everything else that I need to slice and dice a shoot. Plus, I can also manage content on my hard drives right there in the Capture One interface.

When I load thousands of images into a catalog, I want to be able to tame them as quickly as possible. Capture One makes that easy.

Excellent RAW Processing

The Capture One look is different than any other processor that I've used. It's bold. My RAW files jump off the screen even before I begin editing them.

Robust Editing Tools

Ninety-five percent of the time, I can handle all of my image editing in Capture One Pro. Starting with the amazing Contrast slider (that is far more than you'd think), to sophisticated color tools, to lens corrections, to localized editing brushes... this app provides what I need to get the most out of my images.

Flexible Output Options

The Output tab screams professional app. Here I can create a variety of custom export options to run individually or all at once. So if I need a set of master images to send to the client, and another set of web shots for an online gallery, Capture One Pro can provide that for me all at once.

Versatile Catalog Management

I can run a managed catalog or choose to go referenced with external hard drives storing my masters... on both Mac and PC platforms. I can enable a Session while on the road or working on a specific assignment, then incorporate that content into my master catalog. And I can do just about anything else I want with the Capture One Pro catalog structure. Perfect for guys like me who travel and have a master setup back at the studio.

I'm entering my second complete year with Capture One Pro. And I have to say... it feels great to have made a complete transition from Aperture.

Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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If you'd like to spice up your Lightroom post production, consider tapping the Luminar plug-in that's included with the app bundle. It's easy to use, and provides a whole new set of editing options for your Lightroom images.

Step 1 - Install the Luminar Plugin for Lightroom

Enable-Lightroom.jpg

First launch the Luminar app, the go to Luminar > Install Plugins. If the Lightroom plugin is already installed, you're golden. Just click Done. If not, click on the Install button, then click Done once the install is completed. You can now minimize Luminar.

If you just installed the plugin, you'll have to restart Lightroom. Now everything is ready for the next step.

Step 2 - Choose Luminar from Plug-In Extras

02-choose-luminar.jpg

In Lightroom, click once on a photo you wish to edit, then go to File > Plug-In Extras > Transfer to Luminar. After a few seconds, the image will appear in the Luminar interface where you can use all of its creative tools.

03-Edit-in-Luminar.jpg

Step 3 - Apply Changes

Once you've finished your work in Luminar, click on the Apply button, and your image will be flattened and returned to your Lightroom catalog as a Tiff. Mine always come back right next to the original image.

04-back-to-lightroom.jpg

I've found that the Luminar toolset helps me explore my photographs in a new way. As such, it's a great complement to Lightroom's adjustments.

If you decide that you want to work more in depth with Luminar, creating multiple layers and enabling localized adjustments, I recommend that you open a master version of the image in the standalone Luminar app. By doing so, you can save your work document, with all of the layers and adjustments, and come back to it at a later time.

But if you're looking to quickly add come creative punch to a Lightroom catalog image, the plugin is both convenient and fast.

You can try Luminar for free. And if you like what you see, the entire package is only $69.

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #566, Jan. 10, 2017. Today's theme is "10 Questions I Asked Myself in Las Vegas." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

If you've read my latest Nimble Photographer Journal entry, you know that I was a bit underwhelmed with CES this year. And I found myself muttering these questions as I roamed the hallways of Mandalay Bay and the Las Vegas Convention Center. So I thought you might find them interesting.

10 Questions I Asked Myself in Las Vegas

This year's show was more renovation than innovation, IMHO. I mean, I like kitchen remodels as well as the next guy. But I don't usually travel to Las Vegas to experience them firsthand. Here are a few questions, with answers, that passed through my mind during the week.

Las-Vegas-train-station.jpeg

  • Why doesn't my monorail pass work? - Great high tech idea: My prepaid monorail pass will be combined with my CES pass so that I'll have one easy to use badge for everything. Problem is, not only didn't my monorail pass work, I may or may not see a refund for my prepayment.
  • Where the heck is Olympus? - After not hearing a peep from them before the show, I wrote my contact and asked. Olympus decided to sit this out. They must of knew something that I didn't before the show.
  • Is Lyft as Good as Uber? - Since I didn't have a functional monorail pass, I decided to take advantage of the $5 per ride credit that Lyft was offering. I hadn't used them before, and was curious about their service. Bottom line: they are every bit as good as Uber.
  • What happened to the Canon booth? - One place that I could always count on for lots to do at CES was the Canon booth. This year I felt like they were jobbed out to a 3rd party vendor.
  • When did AT&T fix its network? - About half way through the show, it dawned on me that my phone had been working the entire time. This is quite a feat in a venue with thousands of connected geeks.
  • Why doesn't Panasonic get more credit for being great? - One of the bright spots of the week was the great offerings by Panasonic. Not only did they show off the wonderful GH-5, but they updated a number of their lenses. And this was only one small area of their display. Seems like Panasonic should get more respect...
  • Is it worth switching to Fuji just for the Titanium XT-2? - As if this camera didn't look hot enough already!.
  • Are we seeing comebacks from Polaroid and Kodak? - Unlike some of the other Polaroid cameras of late, the Pop looks like a quality device. And Kodak is finding a voice again with a second generation Super 8 and the revival of Ektachrome.
  • Is there no limit to what people will endure for a free lunch? - I can't believe what the press corps tolerates just for a dry sandwich.
  • Is it possible to attend CES and not come home with a cold? - Apparently not!

In the News

DJI reportedly takes majority stake in Hasselblad. "DJI is reported to have acquired a majority share in Hasselblad, according to an article posted January 4 on Luminous Landscape. We asked DJI's Corporate Communication Director of North America, Adam Lisberg, about the reports and he declined to comment. It's telling, however, that DJI isn't making an effort to deny the reports."

"The initial report from LL, written by Kevin Raber, recounts the history of Hasselblad from the company's aerial beginnings to the announcement of the X1D system. Raber speculates that unexpectedly high demand for the X1D forced Hasselblad to look for funding to produce the camera."

Thanks to DPreview.com.

Fisheye in Vegas

If you follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook, you may have noticed that I was relying heavily on my newish Rokinon 7.5mm f/3.5 Fisheye Lens during this trip. The bigness of Las Vegas seemed like a natural subject for this optic. And I have to tell you, I loved shooting with it last week. More about my adventures with it in this segment of the show.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I remember Macworld 2007 quite well. Thanks to my being on the conference faculty, I had a decent seat for the Steve Jobs keynote... the one where he introduced the iPhone.

iphone-introduction.jpg The Introduction of the iPhone, San Francisco 2007 - Canon Rebel XT, f/4, 1/20, ISO1600, -1.0ev, 28mm. Photos by Derrick Story.

By 2007, we really needed an all-in-one device that could handle phone calls, text, personal organization, and the Internet. We were tired of juggling Palm Pilots and candy bar cell phones. Blackberries seemed too pedestrian. And if we could get a decent camera out of the deal, all the better.

The problem was, that first 2-megapixel iPhone camera wasn't very good. And it certainly wasn't going to challenge the Canon XT I toted to San Francisco in 2007.

john-mayer.jpg John Mayer performing at the 2007 Macworld Keynote. Canon Rebel XT.

But the iPhone's sophistication evolved steadily, and by the iPhone 4, we had a good camera in addition to its other mobile features, and things began to change in the world of photography.

We know that the iPhone has all but killed the consumer compact digital camera. I never really liked carrying them around anyway, to be honest. I have two front pockets in my jeans: one for my wallet and the other for my iPhone. That's all I want with me.

Beyond that, however the iPhone was more than just my new compact camera, it was an integral link in my overall photography workflow. Regardless of what camera I was shooting with, I could upload those images, edit them, and publish from practically any location in the world.

iphone-with-adapter.jpg

During my reporting in Las Vegas last week, I would capture the image with an Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, send the images to my iPhone 6S via WiFi, and share them on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter from hotel lobbies, Starbucks, and yes, the occasional casino lounge.

ces-reporting.jpg Reporting during CES 2017.

As much as I like the iPhone camera, and I do like it, what I truly appreciate these days is the mobile connection to my entire photography ecosystem that includes iCloud, Photos for macOS, and all of my social sites. The iPhone is my Swiss Army Knife for reporting on the road. And as such, it has helped me become a more timely, creative photographer.

And to be honest... I'm having more fun than ever.

Photos for macOS - Part of my iPhone Ecosystem

Explore the world of modern photography with my The Apple Photos Book for Photographers that features insightful text and beautiful illustrations.

And if you'd like to cozy up to a video at the same time, watch my latest lynda title, Photos for macOS Essential Training

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Panasonic, Canon Step Up at CES

Just when I was beginning to think that connected devices were going to overrun the halls of the Las Vegas Convention Center, Panasonic and Canon take the spotlight and show photographers that there's plenty for them at CES too.

Canon GX9 Mark II

Canon_G9X_MARKII.jpg The Canon GX9 Mark II.

I held the latest version of the GX9 last night at the Pepcom Digital Experience "Technology Tailgate" Event, and was amazed at how light and nimble it is. The big news about this 1"-sensor wonder is that Canon added its DIGIC 7 processor that allows for 8 fps when shooting RAWs. Basically, it's a muscle car squeezed into a compact. You can preorder the GX9 Mark II for $529 (in silver or black). It should be available next month.

Panasonic GH5

Panasonic-GH5-web.jpg Panasonic GH5

Panasonic's flagship mirrorless camera definitely has a Hemi under the hood. Take a look at this list of highlighted specs.

  • 20.3MP Digital Live MOS Sensor with Venus Engine Image Processor
  • UHD 4K 60p Video (no crop)
  • Internal 4:2:2 10-Bit 4K Video at 24/30p
  • 5-Axis Sensor Stabilization; Dual I.S. 2
  • 0.76x 3.68m-Dot OLED Viewfinder
  • 3.2" 1.62m-Dot Free-Angle Touchscreen
  • Advanced DFD AF System; 6K & 4K PHOTO
  • ISO 25600 and 12 fps Continuous Shooting
  • Dual UHS-II SD Slots; Wi-Fi & Bluetooth

Where Panasonic is distinguishing itself from the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II is with video performance. In addition to its still photography prowess, the GH5 is a serious movie making machine, from cinematic theater to corporate training.

The Panasonic GH5 should be available by the end of March for $1,997

Refreshed Lens Line Up from Panasonic

Panasonic-lens-lineup-web.jpg

If there was ever any doubt that Micro Four Thirds rules the roost for mirrorless lens catalog, these latest updates from Panasonic should confirm what many of us already knew.

Case in point are four refreshed pro lenses, adding a new exterior finish and Dual IS performance when mounted to compatible cameras. They also include a micro step drive system that makes them even better suited for smooth focusing when recording video. The refreshed lenses include: 12-35mm f/2.8 II, 35-100mm f/2.8 II, 45-200mm f/4-5.6 II, 100-300mm f/4-5,6II.

Panasonic also introduced the Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4.0 ASPH. Power O.I.S. ($997) for pros who want a versatile zoom for just about any situation.

More Photography to Come

Other camera makers are making a splash at CES too. We'll keep the coverage coming. Stay tuned for more news.


Join me on my Instagram site as I explore the world of photography in Las Vegas.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #565, Jan. 3, 2017. Today's theme is "Something To Look Forward To." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Have you ever had a friend tell you, "I just want to get something on the books. I like having things to look forward to."? It's a very human emotion. In a lot of ways, I think it's an expression of hope. And it's a concept that applies well to our photography too, as I will discuss in today's show.

Something To Look Forward To

When we're standing at the threshold of a new year, most strive to make the 12 months ahead better than those in the rear view mirror. And one of the ways that we can do that is plan for activities that will bring goodness to our lives.

An area that's rich with possibilities for us is our photography. It offers so many opportunities in a variety of ways, a few of which I'm going to cover right now.

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  • Enter a Photo Competition - Few things feel better to a photographer than having an image earn a top prize. In addition to all of the attention, and possible financial rewards, it is a solid affirmation that we are improving in our craft. But there are other benefits to this activity too...
  • Save For, then Purchase, a New Camera - This is different than slapping an impulse buy on your credit card. Instead, make this a project where you identify the gear that you desire, create a plan to save for it, then purchase it once the funds have been secured. Not only will you have the elation of a new camera or lens, but the satisfaction of designing a business project and accomplishing your goals.
  • Plan a Photography Vacation - There are so many benefits to getting out of your own backyard and exploring a different part of the country with your camera. In addition to the pictures you capture, you will meet new people, taste different foods, and broaden your understanding of the world. The good feelings will begin right away with putting your name on a reserve list or booking the flight.
  • Volunteer Your Services - There are so many areas that could use skilled photographers, but don't know how to find them or can't afford them: the local food bank, churches, schools, and amateur sports teams, just to name a few. If you line up a project for one such entity, imagine how good it feels to say, "Yeah, I'm going to be the photographer for that little leagues baseball team this summer."

In the News

An Update on Brides Magazine's Insistence That Pros Shoot Canon or Nikon. "Brides approached Matsuura with an article proposition: providing couples a guide for choosing a photographer. In response to the question "Besides the quality and style of photographs, what else should brides be thinking about?", Matsuura proposed a series of more detailed questions, one of which was: "What type of equipment do you use?" In addition to the proposed questions, Matsuura offered hypothetical answers that a photographer might give a client in an effort to further illustrate the type of interactions a couple might expect with a potential photographer. These hypothetical answers included the controversial assertion that professionals use either Canon or Nikon cameras."

What she wrote was: "Your photographer should know their equipment. Canon and Nikon are the most readily used cameras, but there are many other well-known professional cameras out there. Whatever your photographer does choose, it's good to make sure that he/she is well versed in their equipment."

But it was changed to: "Ideally, your photographer would use the most readily available professional camera."

Thanks to FStoppers.com.

Do You Have an Old Pentax DSLR?

I have some terrific Pentax-F and Pentax-FA lenses that I would like to compare on digital sensors to the film cameras I'm testing. If you have an older Pentax DSLR that you're not use and willing to sell affordably, please drop me a line at: derrick@thedigitalstory.com

CES is This Week

Most likely, by the time you hear this podcast, I will be in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show. That means I'll be reporting during the week, and will have a special podcast for you next week.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When I use my smartphone and Dropbox mobile to scan a document, the entire process only takes seconds, and the digital file is instantly available across all of my devices. The funny thing about this is, I don't think a lot of Dropbox users are aware of this functionality.

scan-in-dropbox.png

When you tap the + button in the Dropbox mobile app, a popup menu with three options appears: Scan Document, Upload Photos, Create or Upload File. Tap Scan Document, and you're directed to the scanning interface, which is designed specifically for documents and pictures. Here's a short video from Dropbox for Photographers that shows how it works.

Now I can access my new scan from any Dropbox-connected device: phone, tablet, or computer. And since Dropbox is platform agnostic, that means iOS, Android, Windows, and macOS.

See What Else Dropbox Can Do for You

Take a look at my lynda.com training, Dropbox for Photographers to see how this multi-platform service can easily integrate into your photography workflow.

Impressive RAW Power App for Photos

One of the features that I miss from Aperture is the ability to customize the decoding of my RAW files. Now, thanks to the $10 editing extension (and standalone app) RAW Power, I have those tools again. And they are wonderful.

001-RAW-Process.jpg The key to this app is the RAW Processing panel, that gives me control over the actual decoding of the RAW file.

the-raw-process-panel.png

I purchased RAW Power from the Mac App Store, then tried it as a standalone. I usually do that first with editing extensions to make sure everything works OK. And indeed it does. I so enjoy having control again on how software interprets my RAW files.

The key to this editing extension is the RAW Processing panel that contains all the sliders you need to customize the file's decoding, including the ultra-cool boost sliders. Getting these adjustments just right makes everything that follows so much more effective.

I then fired up Photos for macOS and used RAW Power as an editing extension. Same controls, same wonderful results. This file, for example, was captured in existing light with an Olympus TG-4 compact camera. Yet, I was able to take that RAW file and make it shine. Compare the decoded top image to the original (without RAW Power processing) below.

002-Original.jpg Original file before decoding with RAW Power.

RAW Power does include plenty of adjustment tools too, such as shadows/highlights, curves, white balance, and sharpen, just to name a few. So after you decode the file, you can spruce it up a bit too.

But my workflow has been to get the basic image in good shape, then return to Photos for finishing touches such as color cast, vignette, definition, and sharpening.

003-Finishing-Touch.jpg Now for the finishing touches in Photos for macOS.

RAW Power is a wonderful addition to Photos, as well as a strong standalone app. Most of the files that circulate through Photos for macOS are Jpegs from my iPhone shooting. But I do have a surprising number of RAWs also, especially from the Olympus TG-4. How wonderful to finally have a set of pro tools to work on them, and have the results automatically shared across all of my devices.

Master Photos for macOS

Explore the world of modern photography with my The Apple Photos Book for Photographers that features insightful text and beautiful illustrations.

And if you'd like to cozy up to a video at the same time, watch my latest lynda title, Photos for macOS Essential Training

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #564, Dec. 27, 2016. Today's theme is "Two Near Misses and a Hit." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The funny thing about life is that you can be rolling along just fine, then out of nowhere, everything is turned upside down. This week's show features two such incidents that result in a happy ending, plus one case where a good situation was made even better, thanks to technology. I hope you enjoy the show.

Two Near Misses and a Hit

Most of the time we're complaining about technology. The crashing computer that loses an hour's worth of work, dreadfully slow WiFi at a hotel, and dropped calls in the middle of an important conversation are all frustrating examples.

But sometimes our robotic companions can save the day, or at least vastly improve it. And I have three such stories that have happened to me recently.

  • Drobo to the Rescue - I was riding back to the studio on my bike when the phone rang. I wasn't able to answer it in time, but the ensuing voicemail became the cry for help. A client needed a high rez version of an image I had shot for them two years ago, and they needed it in an hour. Here's how my backup drive saved the day.
  • venice-beach.jpg

  • Exit Now! - We were driving on the 405 in Southern California one evening when our navigation unexpected urged us to exit on Harbor Blvd., even though that was a few miles from our destination. In a split second I decided to obey. And what followed saved our entire evening.
  • Family Bonding - Large family gatherings during the holidays are unpredictable events at best. Every person that walks through the front door has a year's worth of ups and downs resting on their shoulders. And you just never know how the batter is going to bake. But this year, thanks to my Olympus camera, WiFi, and the iPhone, we were all able to share a moment that made everything else pale in comparison.

In the News

Why I'm Starting a 365 Day Project in 2017. I strongly encourage everyone to give a 365 project a try. Even if you aren't in a rut creatively, it'll help you explore new avenues for your work. I also recommend having some sort of theme to give direction. For instance, I've decided that the final images will be in a 2.35:1 widescreen aspect ratio to aid my composition in my short film work, even though I'm shooting a still photography camera. My photography, editing, and filmmaking will all see something from this project. Have you tried a 365 project? I'd love to hear from your experiences. Thanks to FStoppers.com.

Review The Apple Photos Book for Photographers

I have two more review copies of The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, and if you'd like to be a reviewer, drop me a note at derrick@thedigitalstory.com. First come, first served.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

What a great time of year for creating slideshows to share with others. Whether it's a wrap-up of the holidays, or the entire year, these short videos are a perfect way to tell your story.

If you're an iPhone shooter, you have a robust slideshow editor on your laptop that can tap into all of those great images on your phone. Photos for macOS makes it easy to author and share these presentations. And if you want to take your movie to the next level, customize your title screens using this simple tip. Here's a video that walks you through the steps.

That's right - the greeting card tool in Photos for macOS can also be used for creating professional title screens for your slideshows. And everything you need is right there under one roof.

Instead of printing the card, you output it to digital and add it to your presentation. The look absolutely great because you have all of the high-end design tools in the greeting card creator at your disposal.

digital-output.png Output to digital to use your design in a slideshow.

A few of these handsome titles will make your video shine. Also, keep the overall presentation short - about 1.5 to 2 minutes - and add some audio as appropriate. Your fans will love it.

But Wait, There's More!

If you'd like to cozy up to more helpful videos, watch my latest lynda title, Photos for macOS Essential Training. Tons of tips to help you bring out your inner artist.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.