Recently in Photography

  Page 5 of 298 in Photography  

This is The Digital Story Podcast #580, April 18, 2017. Today's theme is "The Wedding Civilian" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

After years of donning the official uniform of a wedding photographer - Dual DSLRs tugging at my neck, a utility belt pouches crammed full with flashes and lenses, and a creased white shirt pulled three different ways a once - I am now a civilian. I wear a tailored suit without budging pockets, accessorized by a handsome mirrorless camera accenting my tie as it hangs lightly from my neck via its matching leather strap. And not only has my attire changed, but my attitude as well. And that's the topic of today's TDS Photography Podcast.

The Wedding Civilian

the-wedding-civilian.jpg

First we must define our terms. A Wedding Civilian is different than Uncle Bob.

Now that we've got that squared away, here are five things that a Wedding Civilian should keep in mind.

  • Don't talk to the hired photographer - The last thing that he or she wants to hear about is your camera, your photographic prowess, or your opinion about anything. The official photographer is already dealing with a churning caldron of challenges. Let them be, and stay out of their way.
  • Take advantage of your unique perspective - For the ceremony, choose an angle that allows you to capture the event as a friend or family member. You can record images from the unique perspective of the attendee, surrounded by people, witnessing each moment as it unfolds. I think BTS stories are the most interesting. And you're right there with a backstage pass.
  • Be a silent historian - Turn off your phone, and for the love of Pete, turn off the audible focus confirmation on your camera. Choose the quietest camera you have for the event. And please don't use flash. If you can't capture the shot existing light, wait for another opportunity. Prime lenses are mandatory gear for the Wedding Civilian.
  • Honor the family - You are now an ambassador as well as an artist. In addition to telling the story of the day through your images, honor all requests for portraits and spontaneous group shots. Capture those photos with care, and be sure to share them after the event.
  • Enjoy true photographic freedom - This is what it's all about. You get to sit with friends and family, enjoy the wine, eat when everyone else eats, and take the pictures that you want, when you want to. This is as good as it gets for events. Relish the moment.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air where it accompanied me to a wedding. Yes, it stayed in the car the entire time. So why was I so happy to have it with me.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

Ricoh Isn't Going to Kill Pentax

First Nikon, then Panasonic, and now rumors have spread about Pentax. Let me read you a few lines from the article, Relax, Ricoh Isn't Going to Kill the Pentax Brand or Their Cameras (Confirmed), then I have some comments on what we can do as photographers to help these companies.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

Registration invitations have gone out to Reserve List members for the Autumn in Wine Country Photography Workshop. If you are on the Reserve List, but didn't get your invite, please contact me. You can learn more about the workshops by visiting the TDS Workshops Page.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I've been using Photos for macOS for all of my personal work, and I've yet to regret adding another image to the stack. Why is that?

Ready-to-Fall.jpg "Victoria Winning the Game" - Olympus PEN-F, Lumix-G 20mm f/1.7 lens, ISO 1600, f/4, 1/320th, cataloged in Photos for macOS, processing with the Luminar editing extension. Photo by Derrick Story.

There are a number of reasons why Photos is such a good fit for my personal work. Here are five of them.

  • Mindless Backup - Thanks to iCloud, the moment an image enters my Photos library, it is backed up and available to all of my connected devices. I spend a lot of time archiving and organizing my commercial work. But I don't spend a moment thinking about the safety of my personal shots.
  • Face Recognition - If you haven't worked with this technology for a while, it's worth another visit. Much of my personal work features people I love and care about. And using Faces in Photos, I can find all the shots that I have of anyone in just a matter of seconds. Faces is easy to use, and it works really well.
  • Easy Geotagging - My iPhone shots are automatically geotagged. But the other images need location information added in post. This is so easy to do in Photos. I just start typing the place, and my options automatically appear. And just like that, the photo is geotagged. Again, simple.
  • Object Recognition - This technology is still developing. But even in its early stages, I find it useful. More and more, I'm entering search words such as "Vineyard" or "Ocean" to find images in my library. As these algorithms improve, so will my fondness for this feature.
  • Editing Extensions - More and more, I'm using Luminar and other editing extensions for my work. As a result, I truly enjoy working on images in Photos. And the results are top notch.

If you're already a fan of the Mac/iOS ecosystem, and you're not using Photos, then I suggest you give it another chance - not because Apple needs your patronage, but because I think it will bring happiness to your personal work.

Photos for macOS as Your Digital Darkroom

You can learn more about using Luminar as an editing extension in my lynda.com training, Photos for macOS: Advanced Editing Extensions.

And if you'd prefer to cozy up with a book, check out The Apple Photos Book for Photographers that features chapters on basic editing, advanced post processing, and editing extensions.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Photographers debate about how to take pictures of the disenfranchised on the street. The way that I look at it, is that there are some situations where I want the shot, and many that I don't. And for those that I do, I've found that a little conversation goes a long way.

appease-the-rooster.jpg "Appease the Rooster, Chinatown, SF" - Olympus PEN-F, 14-42mm EZ zoom, ISO 200, Color 3 mode. Photo by Derrick Story.

I tend to be attracted by clever signs. I thought that this image, for example, would make a good photograph. So I introduced myself, asked to take the picture, then put a few dollars in the cup to appease the rooster.

I've found that a lot of chatter isn't required, or even wanted by the subject. My real goal is acknowledgement and respect. Once I've conveyed that, I go about my business and let him go about his. And the interactions tend to go quite well.

In all honesty, we're all just trying to get by. The metaphor that we used in the workshop was that the street is a big aquarium, and we're all part of it. On this particular day, Larry was a bit more colorful than me. And I'm happy that he let me capture that.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Deadly Selfies

After just having spent three days on the streets of San Francisco, there were a number of things that I noticed while keeping an eye out for my workshop crew. And one that really jumped out at me was how tourists lose track of their surroundings while capturing selfies.

P4090959-SF-2017-Workshop.jpg Beware of your surroundings when capturing selfies. Photo by Derrick Story.

I watched people stop in the middle of the street, step off curbs, and hang over railings while photographing themselves. Yes, I absolutely believe in becoming part of the story, but doing so safely.

What I recommend when shooting in potentially dangerous situations is to assign a friend or family member to be a spotter during the capture. If no one in your group is available - group selfie - then most strangers would be happy to keep an eye out for 30 seconds while you take the picture. Just ask a friendly face on the street to serve as lookout.

And even if you don't have the camera pointed back at you, it's easy to lose track of your immediate surroundings when engaged in street photography. Stepping off the curb to get a better angle might not seem that hazardous, unless a bus comes rolling down the street and clips you with its side mirror. Once again, having a lookout while you shoot is a good practice.

If you're the "adult" in the group, be sure to spread the word about staying safe when taking pictures in urban environments.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #579, April 11, 2017. Today's theme is "f/2.8 and Be There" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of the more interesting conversation threads during our SF Street Photography Workshop was about motivation. Our photographers would talk about periods of time where life overtook their art, and during those stretches, the camera seldom saw the light of day. On the flip side, however, it was interesting how quickly they could build momentum once they set aside some time for their camera work. Getting there is half the battle, and how to do that is the topic of today's show.

f/2.8 and Be There

P4091047-SF-chinatown.jpg

First, you may be wondering why I wrote f/2.8 and Be There instead of the traditional f/8 and Be There. It has to do with mirrorless cameras and diffraction.

Now that we've got that squared away, how about that motivation thing? Well, here are a few suggestions.

  • Don't rely too much on your smartphone - Yes, they are convenient, and they do take great pictures. But they also get us out of the habit of making real photography decisions. When possible, carry a traditional camera with you as well - and shoot with it during your daily life moments.
  • Get more exercise outside - Gyms are great for shredding it, but not very good environments for photography, especially if you wish to retain your membership. You need to get outside as well for your workouts (walking, biking, jogging) and take a traditional camera with you.
  • Secure photo time within family time - You don't want photography to drive a wedge in your family life. But you do need to set aside time specifically for your craft. So if you're off on a week long vacation, negotiate before you leave for a few mornings and/or evenings when you can focus on your craft.
  • Spend time with other photographers - The exchange of views and ideas among photographers truly helps keep the creative juices flowing. Workshops, camera clubs, and photo buddies will encourage you to make time for shooting when you might have otherwise settled for another activity.
  • Create projects with deadlines - After everyone in the house has settled down for the night, you can spend some time working on your personal projects. Activities such as organizing, planning, editing, and sharing stimulate the brain. Thinking about your photography before you go to sleep may yield a new idea when you wake up.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air heads to San Francisco where it joined our group for an evening shoot at the Embarcadero.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

The Olympus PEN-F in San Francisco

I just published an article titled, 5 Reasons Why the Olympus PEN-F Crushed it in San Francisco, and I thought I'd share those with you now, plus a few additional tidbits.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

We still have one seat open for our Road Trip workshop. And reservation invitations for the TDS Autumn in Wine Country workshop will go out within the week. If you'd like an invitation to either event, visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Olympus PEN-F is a creative force for everyday use, but it truly shines in an urban environment. And I was once again reminded of its street photography prowess this past week in San Francisco. Here are five reasons why.

olympus-pen-f.jpg

Nobody Cares

I could stand right in front of people with the PEN-F in hand, and neither I, nor the camera seemed to present any type of threat. Having this ability to stay off the radar for my photo subjects provided me tremendous freedom to capture the world at ease.

P4090287-SF-pen-f-proximity.jpg "Shopping in Chinatown" - Olympus PEN-F with 14-42mm EZ, ISO 200, f/5.0, 1/125th, Color Profile 3, -0.7 exposure compensation. Photo by Derrick Story.

Color Profile 3

To say the PEN-F captures amazing color is to state the obvious. I programmed the color setting on the front dial to "Color Profile 3" for my morning in Chinatown. Later that night when I was comparing the SuperFine Jpegs to the RAW files, I was impressed with the film-like color in the Jpegs with the Color 3 setting. In many cases, they seemed like completely different shots.

P4090253-SF-pen-f-color.jpg "Chinatown Alley" - Olympus PEN-F with 14-42mm EZ, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/200th, Color Profile 3. Photo by Derrick Story.

Vertical Shots with Hat On

Because the viewfinder is on the far left, I can shoot vertical images with my baseball cap remaining in place. All I have to do is lower the right side of the camera and keep the viewfinder on the top. I love this technique.

Derrick-Story-by-Carl-Shortt.jpg "Derrick Story in Chinatown" - Photo by Carl Shortt.

Mono Profile 2

When it's time to shoot B&W, I set the front dial to Mono Profile 2. Using the front dial with my preprogrammed profiles makes switching from color to B&W a breeze. And the gritty TRI-X like tones produced by the Mono Profile 2 are quite engaging for street photography.

P4080052-SF-pen-f-monochrome.jpg "Cable Car Exit" - Olympus PEN-F with 9mm Body Cap Fisheye, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/25th, Mono Profile 2, +0.3 exposure compensation. Photo by Derrick Story.

Fully Articulated LCD

There were so many shots where I had to lean far in one direction with my arm extended far above my head and the LCD screen angled downward so I could compose the shot. And when I wasn't using the screen, I could turn it inward so it was protected from the rigors of street photography. The PEN-F LCD is beautiful, sharp, and extremely functional.

P4080039-SF-pen-f-lcd.jpg "Making Room on the Cable Car" - Olympus PEN-F with 9mm Body Cap Fisheye, ISO 1600, f/8, 0.4 seconds, Mono Profile 2, +0.3 exposure compensation, handheld above my head. Photo by Derrick Story.

The Bottom Line

The Olympus PEN-F ($1,099) is an urban photographer's dream camera. Its supreme craftsmanship, handsome looks, intelligent brains, fantastic image quality, versatility, and compactness provide a great shooting experience and impressive results.

If you're a fan of mirrorless cameras, this one should be on your short list for urban photography.

Duets

Sometimes the theme for the day picks you. As we were exploring downtown San Francisco yesterday as part of the TDS SF Street Photography Workshop, I noticed couples, tandems, and juxtapositions everywhere. Here are a few of my favorites.

P4070018-SF-Web.jpg "Looking for Union Square" - After I captured this image, I walked up to this couple and asked if I could help. He said that they were looking for Union Square. Fortunately, they were only two blocks away. So I pointed them in the right direction. Photos by Derrick Story.


P4070080-SF-Web.jpg "Relationships are Work" - Sometimes you just have to work things out. This couple spent some time in the park doing just that.


P4070121-SF-Web.jpg "Walking Arm in Arm" - It was a coolish afternoon on Market St., and it gave this couple an opportunity to stroll close together.


P4070711-SF-Web.jpg "We're Definitely Not Together" - The park accommodates everyone, and it's interesting to see folks in contrast to one another.


P4070716-SF-Web.jpg "You Do Your Thing, and I'll Do Mine"

Today, we ride the cable cars seeking new themes and images in one of my favorite cities to photograph. Stay tuned for what we find next.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The members of The Digital Story virtual camera club who are heading to San Francisco for the Street Shooting Workshop have packed their rain gear and are ready for a true urban adventure.

IMG_1057.jpg

Gritty streets, wet pavement, colorful umbrellas... we might work harder over the next few days, but the payoff is going to be excellent. All of our Think Tank Mirrorless Movers have an excellent weather-resistant design and rain covers as well (every workshop participant gets their own bag).

My Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is weather resistant as well, as are the lenses that I'm packing with it. I've added a protection filter to the front of each optic so I can wipe it off easily in the rain.

IMG_3211.jpg

Plus, I'm bringing my red Olympus TG-4 that not only is totally weather resistant, it will geotag all of my images. The TG-4 captures in RAW, and its image quality is excellent.

We're also going to add some inspiration to our week by visiting the Diane Arbus exhibit at the newly renovated San Francisco Museum or Modern Art. Each workshop participant receives a full general admission pass to SFMOMA as part of their tuition. And we have our reservation there for first thing Friday morning. That will get the creative juices flowing.

I'll let you know how we fare in the rainy weather. And we'll be sharing images as well. So stay tuned.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #578, April 4, 2017. Today's theme is "Becoming Part of the Story" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I find it interesting that photographers often are absent from the stories they tell. Whether it be a family vacation, a gathering with friends, or a somber occasion, we tend to record everyone but ourselves. But as the storyteller, we are most likely part of the narrative too. And exploring how we can better integrate ourselves is the subject of today's show.

Becoming Part of the Story

IMG_3189.jpg

It would be easy to blame this on selfies. And what I mean by that, is that most serious photographers don't want to be caught photographing themselves with their iPhones.

But when you think about it, why not? If we capture an image of us interacting with others in the story, or on location, why is that a bad thing? It doesn't mean that we're a narcissist.

This came to mind again this weekend when I was testing the Roadtrip Air, which I'll talk about in the next segment. I had joined a group of hikers learning about the San Andreas Fault. And if I hadn't taken a shot of me, I would have had everything relating to the activity except for the storyteller himself.

So, here are a few reasons to force yourself to turn the camera in your direction.

  • The artist is often as interesting as the art he creates.
  • So often in movies and TV shows, the storyteller narrates the tale, even if he or she isn't shown on camera. Why? Because it's interesting.
  • If you're the photographer in the family, and you never include yourself in the images, then you haven't done a good job of recording history.
  • There's an art to self-portraiture that is worth learning. Who better to capture a portrait of you, than you?
  • And finally, if you use your smartphone to capture a self-portrait, you're also recording the location data, which can be applied to the other images from the event.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air focuses on removing the center column and using it as a bluetooth-controlled selfie stick.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

The Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art Sample Gallery

In this article posted on DP Review, they wrote, "Recently the new Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art landed in the office, prompting us to get out there and shoot some portraits... from a distance. While one of their heavier primes, performance is exceptional wide-open with very quick focusing. What about that background blur? Take a look at our samples to find out."

The sample images are quite good, and very interesting. I talk about them in this segment of the show.

The Nikon version will be available on April 25, 2017 for $1.399. And the Canon version should be ready by April 6 for the same price.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

We still have one seat open for our Road Trip workshop. (The SF workshop and Rail Adventure have sold out.) If you'd like an invitation to either event, visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Global Filters in Capture One Pro

If you shoot RAW+Jpeg, as many of us do these days, then you should know about Global Filters in Capture One Pro.

global-filters.jpg

They allow us to quickly hide various file types - RAW, Jpeg, PNG, Tiff, Video - so that we're only viewing the images we want. So if I have an upload that contains RAWs, Jpegs, and Video files, and I only want to see the movies, I can use Global Filters to temporarily hide the RAWs and Jpegs. Here's a short movie that shows you how this works.

One of the primary reasons I moved from Aperture to Capture One Pro was because of its robust and easy to use image catalog. Global Filters are just another example of how C1 improves my photography life.

Take Control of Your Capture One Library

My lynda.com title, Advanced Capture One Pro: Library Management, shows you how to organize like a pro, covering techniques for referenced and managed catalogs, plus integrating sessions, backing up masters, and configuring your Capture One environment specifically to your needs.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.