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I can honestly say that I've never seen anything like the Travel Tripod by Peak Design.

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It doesn't have any protruding parts, it's slim, it's strong, and you have both aluminum and carbon fiber options. It's Arca Swiss compatible and has an innovative head with a single ring for adjustment. Even though it extends to 60 inches, it weighs as little as 2.81 pounds (carbon fiber model). And it accommodates DSLRs, mirrorless, and smartphones.

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Their Kickstarter campaign is off to a roaring start, not surprisingly. You might want to go over there and take a look at all the details. This is most likely the next tripod that I will be packing for nimble photography.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #688, May 21, 2019. Today's theme is "5 Things that We Can Learn from Warhol's Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Last week I spent an afternoon with Andy Warhol at SF MOMA. As I looked at his paintings and photographs, I was intrigued at how his work could help my own photography. After studying my images from the day, and thinking about his, I came up with these 5 tips to infuse more creativity into our work. I hope you enjoy the show.

5 Things that We Can Learn from Warhol's Photography

1024-MOMA-Warhol-XF10-web.jpg "Ethel Scull 36 Times" by Andy Warhol. SF MOMA.

My five tips for increasing creativity based on Andy Warhol's images.

  • Art is What You Can Get Away With - This Warhol saying applies wonderfully to photography. Don't limit your work. And especially now in the digital age when experimentation is so easy.
  • The Photograph Doesn't Need to Be the End Product - Some of my favorite Warhol paintings started out as Polaroid prints, but ended up as beautiful mixed-media images.
  • Repetition Can Be Interesting - At first a wall of Campbell's soup cans seems to be a single image repeated many times. But the slight variation pulls the viewer in for a closer look. In his work, "Ethel Scull 36 Times," Warhol created a vibrant, energetic series based on multiple poses of the same subject.
  • Be Bold with Color - The images themselves are interesting for sure. But when bold color is added to the frames, they become vibrant works of art.
  • Take an Instagram Approach to Your Portraits - Looking at a wall of tightly cropped, square portraits reminded me of some of my most popular Instagram images that had great presence and were easy to digest visually.

If you want to see the show for yourself, it's playing at SF MOMA. I'd be curious as to what your takeaways would be.

All about image quality, size and resolution

You can read the entire article here.

All images that are larger than 1920 pixels, in width or height, before upload will be resized to 1920 pixels during upload. To avoid quality loss, we recommend that you upload images that are 1920 pixels or smaller. Note that images that are smaller than 1920 pixels, will not be resized.

Dpi (dots per inch) only matters when it comes to printing or scanning. Monitors don't have dots but pixels, so dpi value has no effect on the quality of an image viewed on a screen or uploaded online.

Before uploading your images to your Portfoliobox site, make sure their color profile is sRGB. If you are using Photoshop go to File > Save for Web. This will make sure that the images will be optimized for web browsers.

Present your best self online with a Portfoliobox site. To create your own Portfoliobox site, click on the tile or use this link to get started. If you upgrade to a Pro site, you'll save 20 percent off the $83 annual price.

2019 Buying Guide: Best instant cameras

You can read the entire article here.

What is it we love so much about instant cameras? Is it the nostalgia-factor? Or the sensation of being able to hold/share a physical print? Maybe it's the excitement that comes from watching an image slowly appear before your eyes. Surely for some, the lo-fi image quality is refreshing in an increasingly high-resolution, digital world.

Favorite: The Fujifilm Instax Mini 70 strikes the perfect balance of price to features to make it our top overall pick - plus it makes use of the most affordable instant format. Available in six colors, the Mini 70 is among the most compact and lightweight instant cameras on the market, and also among the prettiest (in our opinion). The CR2 batteries it uses can be a little annoying to find, but battery life overall is great. And unlike rechargeable instants, the Mini 70 should still have some juice in it even if left on a shelf for several months.

But most importantly, it's really easy to use. Users simply select their shooting mode - normal, macro, selfie, landscape, self timer or high key - and the camera does the rest. And unlike some of its competitors, focus is motor-driven (three positions) and set by the camera when your mode is selected. Exposure is fully automatic, though there is a +2/3rd EV option (that's the high key mode). Overall, the Mini 70 does a good job balancing flash with ambient light thanks to a variable shutter.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I played hooky from work on Friday afternoon and headed down to The City to see the opening of Andy Warhol - From A to B and Back Again at SF MOMA. I had my iPhone X in one pocket and the Fujifilm XF10 in the other. On the way home, my brother-in-law asked, "Why both?"

SF MOMA Looking Up SF MOMA Skylight and Bridge - Fujifilm XF10. Photo by Derrick Story.

I probably gave him a longer answer than he was looking for, but if you were to boil it down to its bones, there would be these five reasons.

  • 24 MP vs 12 MP - The file size from the XF10 is 6000 x 4000 pixels compared to 4032 x 3024 of my iPhone X. That is more image information to play with in post.
  • APS-C Sensor vs 1/2.5"-type - I'm not one to get hung up on sensor size, but this is quite a difference, even with computational photography factored in.
  • Interchangeable Batteries - I keep an extra battery in my pocket, which allows me to shoot as much as I want, as long as I want, without concern about running out of juice. My phone needs to stay charged for other functions including calls, texts, navigation, and (of course) Starbucks purchases.
  • More Manageable Memory - SD cards have high capacity, excellent speed, and are very compact. I can swap out cards quickly. This allows me to experiment with crazy HD movies, wild burst modes, 4K capture, and other storage intense techniques without worry of filling up my phone or my iCloud account.
  • It's a Camera! - I like the form factor of a camera. It's more pleasurable to hold and operate during capture. Plus, the physical buttons, rotating dials, and leather wrist strap all inspire confidence while working. I've yet to find an iOS camera app that's as satisfying to use as my XF10.

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I bought the Fujifilm XF10 for $449, and have already earned my investment back (and that's not even factoring in the enjoyment aspect). The Ricoh GR III will cost you more, but you also get built-in image stabilization and a flash hot shoe with TTL contacts.

Both of these cameras provide a shooting experience that I don't experience with my iPhone (as much as I love it). Maybe I could have saved my brother-in-law all of this technical detail by responding, "Photographers like real cameras."

Because, to tell you the truth, that's the real bottom line.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Photographers who have archived Aperture libraries want to make sure they have access to that content as they move forward beyond macOS Mojave. Apple has announced that OS 10.14 is the last version that will support the venerable photo management app. Now is a great time to start working on your plan to ensure easy access those older pictures.

aperture-3pt6.png Aperture 3.6 running on a 2009 white MacBook

The Path of Least Resistance - Migrate to Photos

Whether you're a fan of macOS Photos or not, the easiest way to protect your Aperture content is to migrate those libraries to Photos. The original Aperture container remains intact, and a new Photos library is created from it. The only real downside is that you've doubled the amount of required space on your hard drive.

There are a couple ways to do this, but I recommend holding down the Option key while launching Photos. It will present a dialog box showing all available Aperture and Photos libraries. Click on the Aperture library that you want to migrate, then click on Choose Library.

Photos will spend a bit of time "preparing the library," then present all of the content in the Photos app. You now have each access to all of your shots, and most of your Aperture work is retained as well.

If you want simple, this is a great way to go.

Repurpose an Old Mac

If you don't want to double your storage requirement using the Photos option, then you could repurpose an old Mac that won't require upgrading beyond Mojave. I tested this option with a 2009 white MacBook that my boys once used.

The first order of business was to max out the RAM. The MacBook had a measly 2 GBs installed. I spent $20 and doubled it to 4 GBs. I would have put more in, but the MacBook can only handle that amount.

I then upgraded the software to Mac OS X 10.11.6 (El Capitan). That version can run macOS Photos and Aperture 3.6. It's not the speediest configuration in the world, but it does get the job done.

BTW: If you want to access older versions of the Mac operating system or apps such as Aperture, all you have to do is log into iCloud on any Mac, then browse the Purchases tab in the Mac App Store. I was able to download and install El Capitan and Aperture using this approach.

I then plugged my Drobo drive with archived Aperture libraries into the white MacBook. I could open libraries directly from the drive, but I think it's better to copy those containers on to the MacBook, then open them. Performance will be better if everything is on an internal hard drive. Remember, we're dealing with older technology here.

Speaking of which, if I wanted to spend another $75, I could upgrade the internal drive to a SSD. That would further improve the sluggish performance of the laptop. It's not that big of deal to me at the moment, so I'll save the money. But it's a nice option to have. (By now, you've probably figured out that the MacBook is easy to crack in to. Just remove 8 screws on the bottom of the laptop. Much easier than today's models.)

Note: A side benefit to this project is that the rejuvenated MacBook is also a handy print server. My Canon Pro-100 gets along great with it. So I can set up a handful of jobs and let it chug away while I work on other projects on other computers.

The Bottom Line

Either of these options should get the job done for you, preserving both your Aperture libraries and your sanity in the process.

My advice is to start on this project now. That way you can chip away at it as time permits. So when you do need to retrieve an image from 2012, you can do so reasonably with minimal hassle.

You may be wondering why I didn't present a third option: migrating your Aperture library to Lightroom or Capture One Pro. Quite simply, it's too much work with uneven results. I find these two approaches far more efficient... and sane.

For Old Time's Sake...

More Aperture Tips and Techniques

To learn more about portrait retouching in Aperture, take a look at Portrait Retouching with Aperture. You may want to check out my other Aperture titles, including Aperture 3.3 Essential Training (2012), Using iPhoto and Aperture Together, and the latest, Enhancing Product Photography with Aperture. Also, take a look at our Aperture 3 Learning Center. Tons of free content about how to get the most out of Aperture.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #687, May 14, 2019. Today's theme is "The Physiology of Active Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Most of us agree that photography as a hobby feeds our creative soul. But it can also be good for the body. A regular diet of planned photo shoots can have a positive impact on our physical well being as well. In today's podcast I'll share with you five of the health benefits that I've enjoyed since embracing the photo exercise plan. I hope you enjoy the show.

The Physiology of Active Photography

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A common pushback that I hear from fellow enthusiasts is that they don't have enough time to pursue their hobby. If you find yourself citing lack of time to engage in activities that are good for you and will provide you with more physical energy and clearer thinking, then you might want to hit the pause button for a minute and re-evaluate your choices.

On average, I work 10 hours a day Monday through Thursday, and 4 hours on Saturday. The only way that I can maintain that schedule and remain productive is by incorporating excise into my week.

Opportunities include early morning before work, lunch breaks, afternoon breaks, and weekends. If you don't take regular breaks, then that's an issue unto itself. To be honest; it's not healthy to skip breaks, especially at lunch time.

Mixing photography into these activities supercharges the health benefits. The chance of capturing a new image that you can share on social is motivating. Actually taking a great picture is exhilarating. And having raw material to work with on your computer feeds creativity.

My recommendation is that you venture out for a walk or a bike ride with your camera at least 3 times a week. According to my math, you have 21 opportunities a week to do this: 7 early mornings, 7 lunch breaks, and 7 afternoon breaks/after work.

And if you embrace this, here are some of the health benefits to look forward to.

  • Sleeping Heart Rate Dip - Research shows that a measurable dip in heart rate during sleep is excellent for your cardiovascular health. Plus, you'll tend to feel more rested in the morning. In my case, burning an extra 225 calories from activity drives my heart rate down 7 beats per minute. On nights when I exercise, my sleeping heart rate is about 52 bpm. When I don't, it tends to by close to 60 or over.
  • Better Regularity - By adding water to my photo walks and bike rides has improved my bathroom breaks. I don't need to articulate how much better this makes one feel. You know what I'm talking about.
  • Stronger Legs - When I was a photographer/writer in the healthcare business, a common mantra was that a healthy 60 starts at 40. Our core strength and sturdy legs mean a higher quality of life as we age. If you want to be mobile later, you have to be active now.
  • Emotional Resilience - I have days like everyone else when the world is intent on knocking me down a peg. Staying at my desk and stewing about it does not produce a better result. Taking a break and exercising does. It is the ultimate reset button.
  • We are More than our Job - Exercising plus photography demonstrates to ourselves and our world that we are more than our job. We are creative, clear thinking, healthy individuals. And that is far more appealing than exhausted, downtrodden, and depressed.

About how many pictures do I take on my photo exercises? Generally 2-3 per 30 minute session. Not a ton, but they sure add up over time. And many of those shots are personal favorites.

How to create a start page for your website that attracts attention

You can read the entire article here.

There are different rules when it comes to designing a good start page. Rule of Thirds and Golden Ratio, to name a couple. Rule of Thirds is the easiest to understand and the simplest to apply. Simply take a screenshot of your start page above the fold, use this easy to use tool to apply a 3 x 3 grid on the screenshot. Instantly you will see if you need to rework your start page or not. A final suggestion, if you are going to rework your start page, pay attention to the change of your bounce rate in Google Analytics, this will help you understand if your new design is working or not.

Present your best self online with a Portfoliobox site. To create your own Portfoliobox site, click on the tile or use this link to get started. If you upgrade to a Pro site, you'll save 20 percent off the $83 annual price.

MFT Sensor and 11"x14" Paper - Nearly Perfect Fit

I heard from Drew at Red River Paper, and he forwarded a comment that he thought I would be interested in: Full size images from Micro Four Thirds sensors are almost a perfect fit on 11" x 14" paper. I did a little testing, and sure enough if he wasn't correct about that.

I then ask Drew about their inventory of 11" x 14" paper, and he said that they have a wide variety of surfaces. You may want to check it out.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

nikon-FA.jpg

The Nikon FA was introduced in 1983 and marketed as Nikon's most sophisticated techno-wonder. It was the first Nikon to incorporate multi-segmented metering. Twenty-five years later, Apple rolled out the iPhone X that utilizes computational photography with millions of lines of code executed with each tap of the shutter button. It is an incredible digital capture device.

When I work with analog, I also capture an iPhone image to use for my note taking. I thought you might be interested to see how things have evolved over the last 25 years. State of the art analog in the 1980s vs amazing 21st century tech.

Kitty Nikon FA Kitty looking out the window. Nikon FA, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, Program mode, matrix metering, Fujicolor 200 film. Un-retouched. Photo by Derrick Story.

Kitty iPhone X Kitty looking out the window, iPhone X.

I like this shot of Sylvester looking out the screen door because it is a backlit scene. (You might not realize that looking at the iPhone image. More on that later.) The Nikon FA with its new-fangled metering system actually does a wonderful job of determining the exposure in program mode. Any shortcoming in dynamic range is due to the latitude of the film.

The iPhone, on the other hand, does a great job of balancing both the main subject and the brighter background. There is more shadow detail in the dark fur, and the highlights are much more recovered.

Now the question is, which shot is more pleasing to the eye? Well, that's an individual decision, isn't it?

Neon Sign Nikon FA Neon sign. Nikon FA, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, Program mode, matrix metering, Fujicolor 200 film. Un-retouched. Photo by Derrick Story.

Neon Sign iPhone X Neon sign. iPhone X. Un-retouched.

When I look at the neon sign image, I'm amazed by the highlight recovery in the iPhone X version. The sky in the upper left corner and the reflection on the top of the umbrellas are perfectly exposed.

The analog Nikon shot definitely displays more contrast. And to be honest, is a more accurate representation of the actual lighting. The shadows are darker and the reflections are bright. That's more how things looked at that time of day.

And that's what I've noticed with film photography... I get a better sense for the lighting because it hasn't been clipped on both ends of the histogram. Do I love the wild dynamic range of computational photography? Of course! It's such a luxury.

But along the way I don't want to lose my ability to read the scene, and to understand what's happening with the lighting. Film photography helps me stay sharp that way.

My bottom line is that I like both sets of images. And I feel lucky to have the option to choose which way to go for any given subject. And I might add, that I think the Nikon with a consumer roll of color film held up quite well. Not bad for an old man.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Is Payboo Right for You?

Payboo is both a line of credit and a creative sales tax solution offered by B&H Photo in response to a recent ruling by the Supreme Court in favor of the states wanting to collect sales tax on out of state purchases. Payboo is offered by Synchrony Bank with a revolving credit limit for any B&H purchases made online, in-store, or by phone.

payboo-graphic.png

When you complete a transaction using Payboo, you initially have to pay your home state sales tax, but it will be instantly refunded. And at the same time, both you and B&H will be complying with the law.

The Backstory

Last year, the Supreme Court ruled that out-of-state retailers must collect sales tax on Internet purchases. California and other states have recently implemented this ruling and B&H is now collecting sales tax on all applicable sales in those states. As a result, customers are now paying more for their purchases. To offset this increase, B&H came up with Payboo to mitigate the impact of sales tax for these purchases.

How it Works

Use Payboo and save the tax. When you make a purchase, you pay the tax. But with the Payboo card, you're refunded the tax amount instantly. Even though you get the money back, B&H will collect and remit state sales tax in accordance with state sales tax laws and regulations.

The Good News, but Things to Be Aware of

On the good news front, they are offering instant approval for qualified applicants. So you can use your account right away (handy for an on-the-spot big purchase). The application process is fast and easy. And, there's no annual fee.

However, if you work your way through the application, you'll see that you have 23 days to pay the balance with no interest. If you extend beyond that period, the annual percentage rate (APR) is 29.99 percent. That's steep. So if you carry a balance forward, you will quickly give back any savings you earned in the first place.

The Bottom Line

Payboo is a creative (and clever) option for those who want to offset the state sales tax on their B&H purchases. California residents, for example, would save about 8 percent.

But the numbers only work in your favor if you pay off the balance within the 23 day grace period. Any charges that you roll over to the next month will incur a 30 percent APR interest charge. So plan carefully if you choose to go the Payboo route.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #686, May 7, 2019. Today's theme is "I Say Goodbye; You Say Hello." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It has been a particularly tumultuous spring for me. So far this season I've had to bid farewell to business relationships, software favorites, and planned investments. This might feel a bit disruptive, but it also opens the door for new adventures as well. This week I share my goodbyes, plus have a terrific interview with my good friend Oliver from Boinx Software. Let's get to it!

I Say Goodbye; You Say Hello

blue-dock-1024.jpg

Here are this season's goodbyes, and a couple hellos as well.

  • Goodbye: My gig at Skylum Software - For those of you who hang out at the Skylum Facebook Public Photography Page, you might notice that I'm no longer moderating. I was recently informed via email that those operations are moving back to Ukraine.
  • Hello Frederick Van Johnson - We recently reconnected and I'm on an upcoming episode of TWiP, and will probably be on there again soon after.
  • Goodbye: Aperture Software for Real - Apple announces that Aperture will not run on macOS after Mojave. Those of you still hanging on should freeze a Mac in time so you can keep using the app.
  • Hello Portfoliobox! - Looks like our friends a Portfoliobox will be returning for another sponsor run on TDS. I'm thrilled to be working with them again.
  • Goodbye: VW Electric Bus in 2020 - I had planned on replacing my VW Vanagon in 2020 with the new all electric VW Bus for workshops, only to learn that the date has been moved back to 2022. Nuts. Looks like I'm going to have to wait a couple more years.

An Interview with Oliver Breidenbach, Boinx Software

I first met Oliver when I was program chair for the Mac Developer Conference for O'Reilly Media. His software company that he started with his brother, Boinx, makes some wonderful tools for media artists. Today, we're going to talk about mimoLive. It is amazing broadcast software for educators, businesses, and now, podcasters as well. You'll learn lots in this conversation with Oliver.

Update on the Nimble Photographer Podcast

If you're interested in learning insights from working artists who have managed to survive in this competitive environment, I would encourage you to subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast. It's available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Podcasts, Stitcher, and wherever you listen to your shows. My next interview should be live next week. In the meantime, you may want to check out to complete conversations with Trey and Ben. They're available right now.

New Online Trainings for Capture One Pro 12 and Luminar 3 with Libraries Now Available

Luminar 3 with Libraries Essential Training

Check out my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that is available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications.

Once you apply these tools to your images, you'll discover that you can enhance them in ways never before possible, especially so easily. I hope you have a chance to explore both my training and the Luminar application itself. It may change your photography.

Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training

Topics in this course include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

For those of you who like to shoot RAW+Jpegs, The Global Filters tool in Capture One Pro can be quite handy. It's available near the top of the View menu.

It allows you to quickly control what you see in the thumbnail browser. You can hide Jpegs, RAWs, processed Tiffs, PNGs, or movie files with a simple command. I like it to hide the RAWs when I only want to see and work with the Jpegs, or vice-versa.

In this short video, I walk you through the steps for using Global Filters Capture One Pro. This is from my essential training on LinkedIn Learning and lynda.com.

Use global filters to see only certain file types from Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training by Derrick Story

There's also a cautionary note: Global Filters are sticky, so if you find files missing, that's probably the reason why!

global-Filters-1024.jpg

This is just one of the many techniques that I cover in this course. Other topics include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

S1-on-white.jpg

Here's a close look at the RAW files produced by two of the most talked about cameras of 2019. First up, we have the heavy weight Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24-105mm Lens.

The Panasonic S1 at 200 Percent

These RAW files were recorded in Program mode with auto ISO and auto white balance. The files were then loaded into Capture One Pro 12.3 running on an iMac with Retina 4K display and Radeon Pro 560 graphics card. No image edits were made to the files. The screenshots are presented the way that Capture One Pro decoded them. The loupe view in the image is at 200 percent. You can see the basic metadata for the image at the bottom of its frame.

Panasonic-S1-A3

Panasonic-S1-A4

Next up, we have two images from the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Mirrorless Digital Camera with an original version of the Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II ASPH. POWER O.I.S. Lens.

olympus-e-m1x.jpg

The Olympus OM-D E-M1X

These RAW files were recorded in Program mode with auto ISO and auto white balance. The files were then loaded into Capture One Pro 12.3 running on an iMac with Retina 4K display and Radeon Pro 560 graphics card. No image edits were made to the files. They are presented the way that Capture One Pro decoded them. The loupe view in the image is at 200 percent. You can see the basic metadata for the image at the bottom of its frame.

Olympus-E-M1X-B1

Olympus-E-M1X-B2

Notes on Comparison

This is not a scientific test. I wanted to see how the files compared after walking around taking pictures with these wonderful cameras. Images from both devices were captured in good light and lower ISOs. I would anticipate greater differences between their respective image qualities at higher ISOs.

Both cameras rendered sharp images at normal viewing and at 200 percent. It's really quite remarkable the quality we have in our cameras these days. I could tell some difference with patterns between the two competitors. The Panasonic S1 did an outstanding job of resolving linear elements displayed at various angles. The E-M1X had plenty of pop, but some of the lines weren't quite as smooth. This was only noticeable at high magnification.

The other thing that jumped out at me was the softer depth of field falloff shooting in just regular program mode with the Panasonic S1. Even at f/4, which is the maximum aperture for the 24-105mm zoom I was using, there is some lovely softness behind the subjects.

For a walk around field test, taking pictures as I would on vacation, I loved what I saw. There is an advantage to full frame, but you have to magnify (or go into low light) to appreciate the difference.

Master Capture One Pro 12

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.