Recently in Photography

  Page 183 of 296 in Photography  

Over the last few months, I've had a lot of face time with photographers at all levels. And I've noticed that successful shooters often embrace what I call the "flexible mind." This week I take a few moments to share a few key factors that could influence your career, regardless if you're a photographer or not, in a positive way.

Listen to the Podcast

You can also download the podcast here (29 minutes). Or better yet, subscribe to the podcast in iTunes. You can support this podcast by purchasing the TDS iPhone App for only $2.99 from the Apple App Store.

Monthly Photo Assignment

High ISO is the November 2010 Photo Assignment. You can read more about how to submit on our Member Participation page. Deadline for entry is Nov. 30, 2010. Entries must be recorded at ISO 800 or above.

TDS Spring 2011 Photography Workshop

We're making plans now for the Spring 2011 TDS Photography Workshop. If you want your name on the reserve list, just drop me a line.

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. It's a blast!

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper -- Try the $7.99 Sample Kit.

Make Your Photos Sizzle with Color! -- SizzlPix is like High Definition TV for your photography.

Blurb believes passionately in the joy of books - reading them, making them, sharing them, and selling them. Learn more by visiting Blurb on The Digital Story.




Technorati Tags:
, , , , ,


You can have all of your photos and movies managed by one database, yet still use the necessary tools to get the job done. Many of my current assignments require that I deliver both video and images. A workflow that will keep you from going crazy it to upload everything into Aperture 3.

For simple video pieces, you can edit video in Aperture. If you need more tools, then iMovie '11 can tap into your Aperture library for content, create and output movies, without duplicating the source material. This gives you one set of master footage, but multiple production options.

iMovie 11 iMovie '11 using Aperture 3 to manage assets. Click on image for larger version.

The process is fairly simple.

  • Upload everything into Aperture.
  • Organize as you normally would.
  • Launch iMovie and let it generate thumbnails for all of your Aperture video. This could take a while if you have a lot of content.
  • Edit and produce your video in iMovie. The source material in Aperture will be read, but not altered.

iMovie will create a couple megabytes of material and store it in the "iMovie Projects" folder. But that's about it. And even if you need to move your Aperture library to another hard drive, you can reconnect the content in iMovie (iMovie Help explains how).

It a fairly efficient approach that will help you manage all of your source material. You can also use iPhoto instead of Aperture in this scenario.

More Aperture Tips and Techniques

To learn more about Aperture 3, check out my Aperture 3 Essential Training on Lynda.com. Also, take a look at our Aperture 3 Learning Center. Tons of free content about how to get the most out of Aperture.

If you want to see an example of the Aperture/iMovie connection, here's a video that I produced on assignment for Lowepro at PhotoPlus Expo 2010. I shot the footage with a Canon 5D Mark II, uploaded to Aperture, edited in iMovie, and produced before I returned home. You can work very fast using this set-up.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


Barry Tarr - Saturated

Here's a collection of images that will fill your eyes. The assignment for September 2010 was "Saturated." Check out this great set of images from members of the TDS virtual camera club. And which one will be the SizzlPix Pick of the Month?

The November 2010 assignment is "High ISO." Start working on your contribution now. Details can be found on the Member Participation page. You can now submit photo assignment pictures up to 800 pixels in the widest direction.

Please follow the instructions carefully for labeling the subject line of the email for your submission. It's easy to lose these in the pile of mail if not labeled correctly. For example, the subject line for next month's assignment should be: "Photo Assignment: Nov. 2010." Also, if you can, please don't strip out the metadata. And feel free to add any IPTC data you wish (These fields in particular: Caption, Credit, Copyright, Byline), I use that for the caption info.


Photo by Barry Tarr. (Click on it to see enlarged version.) You can read more about how Barry captured this shot, plus see all of the other great images on the September 2010 Gallery page.


Good luck with your November assignment, and congratulations to all of the fine contributors for September. Once again, it's a great collection of images.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter

-


Now Available! The Digital Photography Companion. The official guide for The Digital Story Virtual Camera Club.

  • 25 handy and informative tables for quick reference.
  • Metadata listings for every photo in the book
  • Dedicated chapter on making printing easy.
  • Photo management software guide.
  • Many, many inside tips gleaned from years of experience.
  • Comprehensive (214 pages), yet fits easily in camera bag.

Technorati Tags: , ,

Once you figure out that it feels so crowded at PhotoPlus Expo 2010 because they made the aisles more narrow, you start looking for direct routes to your destination. Along the way, you're bound to run into someone you know. It's the ultimate photographer "meet and greet" in the US.

Lowepro Booth at PhotoPlus Expo 2010 Inside the Lowepro booth at PhotoPlus Expo 2010. Click on image to enlarge.

Incredibly, I can attend one show a year and catch up with everyone I had neglected over the past 12 months. Thanks to Facebook and other networking tools, we don't have to waste as much time reviewing our personal histories. Just get to the fun stuff.

I'm happy to have the Lowepro booth as my show floor office. It gives me a place to stand. Seriously, it's busy here. The floor itself isn't as big as past years, but we still have many major hitters. And the classes are top notch as always.

If you're around today, I hope you come by the Lowepro booth to say hello. And if I'm not there, don't worry. We'll probably run into each other anyway.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


When the elevator door opened to the SoHi room on the 45th floor the Trump SoHo Hotel, I was greeted by the good folks at Adobe who were hosting the gathering there... and this spectacular twilight scene.

NY Skyline from Trump Hotel SoHo New York Skyline at Twilight by Derrick Story. Click on image for larger version.

There was great food prepared and chilled wine at the bar. But I headed straight for the window with my Canon 5D Mark II over my shoulder. This image was recorded at ISO 3200, 1/10 of a second at f/4. I processed the Raw file in Photoshop Elements 9 using Adobe Camera Raw. There's still more work to do on this shot, but I wanted to share it while the memory of this beautiful scene was still fresh in my mind.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


In the Air with the MacBook Air

MacBook Air

One of the best reasons to consider an Apple MacBook Air is for travel. It has many of the attributes that I've come to love about the iPad: it's light, has long battery life, and works well in tight spaces. But unlike the iPad, the Air has a full size keyboard, more powerful processor and graphics card, more Ram, more storage, bigger screen, Mac applications, and a built-in SD card reader (13" model). But those are all just specs. How did it perform on a coast-to-coast flight in economy class?

Quite well, thank you. As I type this, the battery is still going strong. That is such a luxury during a full day of travel. Then, there was the surprise. The wedge shape, which I didn't think much about at first, works very well when you slide the laptop edge-down into the document sleeve in your carry-on bag. Space is always tighter at the bottom of the bag than at the top, especially in the front pouch where I like to store the MacBook Air. By sliding the Air edge-down into the sleeve, it fits easily, yet removes easily by gripping the thicker top. So, the Air's wedge design isn't just for beauty, there's a real practical aspect too.

The number one question I've been getting since I started testing the Air is, "How does it perform?" I think this is on peoples' minds because the first generation was a little under-powered. I have the 2.13 GHz model with 4 GBs or RAM. And it has performed very well. I've run Aperture, iMovie '11, Adobe Premiere Elements, iWork, and QuickTime. Movie editing was smooth, and Aperture 3.1 has been quite snappy. Over time, I'll have even a better feel for performance. But on the first flight, the Air was a joy to operate.

Another interesting aspect is that it doesn't get hot. Even during movie editing, the bottom was only slightly warmer than room temperature. Same goes for the display. I'm not quite sure how Apple pulls that off, but, between its light weight and lack of heat, the Air is the most comfortable laptop I've ever used.

And finally, I love the SD card slot. This is the first Mac that I've owned that has one. And when you're working in cramped quarters, it's great not having to fumble around for a card reader. I would shoot, then remove the card, then edit. Bliss!

I'll have more to report as this New York assignment unfolds. But, I'm happy to report that the Air flew with flying colors.

Oh, and just one more thing. I'm still using the iPad too. I took advantage of its 3G connectivity when I didn't have WiFi, especially while waiting for takeoff on the plane. It too has crazy long battery life. Plus, that's where my subscription to Popular Photography is.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


Setting Up the New MacBook Air

software_reinstall.jpg

The new MacBook Air is every bit as elegant in person as it appears on TV. When the shipment arrived this morning, I got right to configuration so I could take it on my trip tomorrow to PhotoPlus Expo in New York.

The typical Mac OS X apps were already loaded (including iLife '11) and backed up on the Software Reinstall USB Flash drive. No more DVDs. First app that I loaded was Aperture 3.1 to see how it would run on the Air. After transferring my photo library and testing for a short period of time, the MacBook Air handled Aperture just fine, even with a connected USB hard drive for my referenced files. I'll have more on this in an upcoming post. But for now, I feel confident going to New York with just the Air, even though I'm on assignment for Lowepro.

Physically speaking, I'm impressed with the keyboard. It's solid and comfortable to type on. It's not backlit, and I'm not surprised considering the thinness of this laptop. The 1440x900 backlit display is plenty bright. I actually have the brightness backed off a bit in normal room lighting. Photographs look terrific on the MacBook Air.

"Instant On" is definitely for real. When I open the laptop lid, rousing it from sleep, the screen illuminates after about a 1 second delay. Close enough to instant for me.

In general, performance is very snappy. I have the 13" 2.13 GHz model with 4 GBs of 1067 MHz DDR3 RAM. It's perfectly quiet, solid, and I think it's going to be fun to have on this New York assignment. Stay tuned for more.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


iPhoto '11 features an overhauled user interface and lots of fresh code beneath the hood. Touted features include Full Screen Mode, design templates for Email, new book making tool, and better syncing with your Facebook and Flickr sites. In this week's podcast, I take a look at the new iPhoto and share what I've learned using it.

iPhoto '11 Book

I've also published a review of iPhoto '11 on Macworld Magazine if you want more details and insights about Apple's consumer photo management application.

Listen to the Podcast

You can also download the podcast here (26 minutes). Or better yet, subscribe to the podcast in iTunes. You can support this podcast by purchasing the TDS iPhone App for only $2.99 from the Apple App Store.

Monthly Photo Assignment

Fall is the October 2010 Photo Assignment. You can read more about how to submit on our Member Participation page. Deadline for entry is Oct. 31, 2010.

TDS Spring 2011 Photography Workshop

We're making plans now for the Spring 2011 TDS Photography Workshop. If you want your name on the reserve list, just drop me a line.

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. It's a blast!

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper -- Try the $7.99 Sample Kit.

Make Your Photos Sizzle with Color! -- SizzlPix is like High Definition TV for your photography.

Blurb believes passionately in the joy of books - reading them, making them, sharing them, and selling them. Learn more by visiting Blurb on The Digital Story.




Technorati Tags:
, , , , ,


Lowepro Pro Roller Attache x50

The recently announced Lowepro Pro Roller Attache x50 is an inventive 2-bags-in-one solution that I'm testing for my assignment to PhotoPlus Expo in New York City. I think this is a good trip for the bag because:

  • I'll be on the road for 5 days. Not too long, but certainly not an overnighter.
  • I'm on assignment. I have to take my pro gear and a computer.
  • I have to make a flight connection, so I want to bring my luggage onboard with me.
  • I want to have everything I need, but travel comfortably.
  • Once I arrive, I want to work comfortably.

To pack for the trip, I remove the shoulder bag from inside the roller and load it up with my Canon 5D Mark II, 24-105 mm zoom, 16-35 mm zoom, 50mm f.1.8, LED fill light, Canon 270 EX fill flash, mics, cards, batteries, amd filters. A 13" MacBook goes in the front computer sleeve, and the iPad goes in the back pocket. There's a trolly sleeve that allows me to slide the bag over the handle of the roller.

In the roller itself, I pack my Giottos Vitruvian tripodwith ball head, a couple changes of clothes, toiletries, battery chargers, and misc.

Once I arrive to the hotel, I'll unpack the roller, put the shoulder bag inside the drop-drawer tray, and use the wheels while I'm working on the job. There's a hideaway tripod mount in the extended handle of the bag that I can use as a lightstand while I'm working. When it's time to fly home, I go back to the original configuration.

The Pro Roller Attache x50 is well designed and high quality. It looks sharp lets me carry-on all of my luggage, and has the space and features I need to get the job done. It should be available in retail channels by the end of the year.

If you want to see a movie on how to use the device, here's one that I shot at photokina with the Canon 5D Mark II.



twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter


Today Apple announced two new models of the MacBook Air. The larger of the two, 13.3", could be the mobile device that nimble photographers have been waiting for.

Macbook Air Dimensions

The specs are impressive:

  • 13.3" LED backlit display at 1440 x 900 pixels
  • Core 2 Duo processor (1.86 GHz) with NVIDIA GeForce 320M graphics
  • Full size keyboard and multi-touch trackpad
  • Up to 256 GB of Flash memory (no traditional hard drive)

Since the device weighs less than 3 pounds, has instant-on, 7 hours of working time, 30 days of standby time, plus you have USB input to Mac OS X, you get many of the benefits or a traditional laptop combined with the portability of an iPad.

This will most likely become the desired computer for photographers on the go. Given that the top-of-the-line model is priced at $1,599, I think many shooters will make the move right away. More to report soon.


twitter.jpg Follow me on Twitter