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This is The Digital Story Podcast #891, April 18, 2023. Today's theme is "Are You Nuts? (buying a monochrome only camera)." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I would imagine that most people's first reaction to the just-announced Pentax K-3 III Monochrome DSLR would be, "Who would buy that?" In fact, I may have uttered the same thing. But after a little research on the idea, I'm not so sure. Find out why, and lots more, on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 891

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Are You Nuts? (buying a monochrome only camera)

Pentax-Monochrome.jpg

The Pentax K-3 Mark III Monochrome is variant of its highly regarded 25.7MP APS-C DSLR, but with no color filter array.

What happens without the color filter array? Well, according to Pentax, typical color image sensors are designed to receive light passing through red (R), green (G) and blue (B) color filters, so each pixel detects only one color-data component. To compose a monochrome image, color sensors must convert color data into monochromatic data by interpolating the color data they collect. The new monochrome-specific image sensor, however, can faithfully reflect the brightness data obtained by each pixel in the image -- without the interpolation process -- to produce extra-fine monochromatic expression, in images high in resolution and rich in gradation. Plus, there's no AA (anti-aliasing) filter either.

The changes just weren't on the inside either. The PENTAX K-3 Mark III Monochrome provides white backlight illumination on the LCD data panel positioned on its upper panel, while featuring "Monochrome" lettering printed on the upper-left shoulder of the back panel. Its menu screen features a black-and-white visual scheme as default, while the SR (Shake Reduction) badge is finished in silver. The icons printed on buttons and switches across the camera's exterior are finished in three shades of gray to assist the users with their camera operation. All in all, the concept of monochrome photography is evident throughout the camera body. Plus, since WB isn't an issue, the white balance button of the PENTAX K-3 Mark III is replaced with the Fx (function) button.

Still not swayed? Fair enough. Let's dig a little deeper.

This is only the third monochrome-only camera on the market. Leica and Phase One each have an offering, at many times more the price than the Pentax.

Leica is just getting ready to release the M11 Monochrom Rangefinder Camera. What's interesting about the M11 Monochrom is that this is, I believe, the fourth edition in its monochrom line. Far from a one and done.

As I continued to research and think about the Pentax Monochrome, I realized five things that weren't initially apparent to me.

  • Total Embodiment of B&W - It's not just the sensor, the entire camera oozes monochrome goodness, from its stealthy body design, to custom BW settings, to the heart of the camera itself. It is the total B&W experience.
  • Compatible with Every Vintage Pentax Lens - Yes, you can use your modern Pentax AF lenses on the Monochrome, but you can also mount a Pentax-M 50mm f/2.0 and further stylize your B&W captures. Vintage lens are a blast on any camera, but imagine using your favorites on this Monochrome body. And since the image stabilization is sensor-based, you have IS for the vintage glass as well.
  • Affordable by Comparison - The Leica M11 Monochrom was just released for $9,195. Plus, we know how much the lenses sell for. The Pentax Monochrome will be released in late April for $2,199.
  • Better Low Light Performance, No Color Noise - The monochrome sensor provides an additional stop of sensitivity, better capture sharpness, and less noise.
  • No Post Processing Required - For those who want the pure photography experience without the need for post processing, just grab your yellow and red filters, and fire away with the Pentax Monochrome.

Am I saying that you should check your credit card balance and buy the K3 Monochrome? No, I'm not. It is a specialty camera for a niche audience.

But what I am saying is that I'm thrilled that Pentax continues to explore all aspects of photography and deliver tools for those who want this experience. I'm very much hoping to get my hands on one. I just hope that I'll be able to let it go once I do.

You can now order your Pentax K-3 Mark III Monochrome.

Meike's New 85mm f/1.4 to be the First 3rd Party Autofocus Lens for Canon RF

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.com.

Meike has announced a new 85mm f/1.4 autofocus lens for Sony E, Nikon Z, Leica L, and -- surprisingly -- Canon RF mounts. If this stands, Meike will be the first third-party manufacturer to come to market with an autofocus-equipped lens for Canon's mirrorless mount.

While Meike isn't the first third-party camera lens manufacturer to make an autofocus-equipped Canon RF lens, if things stand it will be the first to actually successfully sell it.

For example, Rokinon (also known as Samyang), tried to release a 14mm f/2.8 autofocus lens for Canon RF and Viltrox attempted to sell several autofocus lenses that would mount to Canon's mirrorless cameras, but those companies quickly heard from Canon's lawyers and ceased production.

Last September, Canon confirmed that it was pursuing legal action against manufacturers that were producing autofocus lenses for its RF mount. It's not clear if anyone who actually purchased any of those lenses received them, and -- until now -- no third-party manufacturer has tried to produce another since Canon's legal department is particularly aggressive -- the company has repeatedly shown that outside of cameras in its printer department as well.

The only third-party RF lens to get the official nod from Canon is the Cosina Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1 aspherical, which is notably not an autofocus lens.

In addition to RF mount, Meike intends to make the stepping motor-driven autofocus lens available for Sony E, Nikon Z, and Leica L-mounts (though the company humorously refers to it as Panasonic L mount).

At the time of publication, Meike had not determined a final price or the release date. The lens is currently on display at the NAB Show in Las Vegas. It remains to be seen if Canon will allow Meike to actually produce the RF mount version of the lens.

This Week on Live View

"This imaging revolution will be different than the last one" by Ben Long; "A Day Later, A Dollar Wiser" by Jim Kuzman; and "No Skies Were Harmed in the Making of My Photographs" by Michael Bryant.

If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view. Hope to see you there.

Incredible Hand-Held 30 Second Exposures With an iPhone App

You can read the entire article FStoppers.com.

From the creators of ReeXpose comes Reeheld. It apparently uses AI stabilization (something we are all very aware of at the moment) to create stunning handheld images.

This is ideal for when you don't have your camera kit with you. Missing your tripod? Don't worry using this app can give you up to 30 seconds of exposure blending the correct parts together. Now I'm not a landscape photographer as such but there are times when I'm out and about and like to take pictures but just don't have my camera with me. This could be the answer. Other apps that Dewis includes in his video are Spectre which has been around for a long time but has just not been updated in quite a while.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 90 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #890, April 11, 2023. Today's theme is "The Thing About Sunsets (and other notes from Maui)." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When you're on an island in the Pacific during springtime, the sky is a moving picture show of clouds. And when the sun begins to set, well, that's the main feature. Photographers are drawn to sunsets like moths to flame. And in my view, there's more to it than just another pretty picture. This, and other notes from Maui, on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 890

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The Thing About Sunsets (and other notes from Maui)

P4080023-Maui-1024px.jpg

Sunset is about a quarter to seven in Maui right now. So around 6pm, regardless of what you're doing, we usually put a bookmark there and head down to the beach.

It's fun to watch the gathering crowd in what has become an evening tradition on the upper west side of the island. Some folks bring fish and veggies to barbecue while others are holding cocktails in a plastic cups. And you can hear fragments of conversations wafting in the air.

The other night, as the sky was lighting up in shades of orange and blue, a lady walked by and noticed how stunning it was. "Will a picture of that turn out?" she asked out loud. I said, "Of course. Try to frame it with those palm trees. The silhouettes will add some depth to your image." "Oh, that's a good idea she said," while holding her iPhone up to the sky.

She was not alone. Many of us were capturing the moment with our cameras. It's not that I have a shortage of Maui sunsets. But each one of them is a little different and often has its own story.

And that's the thing about sunsets. Yes, the common denominator is that they are beautiful. But they are also different. And just because you captured one the night before, doesn't mean you should pass on the next. Because they will be as unique as two snowflakes landing on a frozen leaf.

One of the reasons I never get tired photographing Maui sunsets is because I always have other elements to play with. On the horizon, there are the islands of Molokai and Lanai that always attract their own clouds. I can count on at least on sailboat drifting by. And then there are the silhouettes of palm trees and people in the foreground.

No reasonable photographer can turn their back on a striking sunset without pulling out their camera. Nor should they. There is no better way to end the day than standing with loved ones and strangers admiring nature's final flourish before the evening stars take over the sky.

Meet Me at High Noon

If sunsets are the epitome of beauty and ease, photography at high noon is its scurrilous sibling. With the sun high overhead and the landscaped bathed in harsh, contrasty light, middle of the day compositions can be a real challenge.

I remembered to pack a Hoya R72 IR filter to use with my X110V in monochrome+R mode, and immersed myself in hyper B&W photography.

I love the results!

DPReview closure: an update

You can read the entire article on DPReview.com.

We've received a lot of questions about what's next for the site. We hear your concerns about losing the content that has been carefully curated over the years, and want to assure you that the content will remain available as an archive.

We've also heard that you need more time to access the site, so we're going to keep publishing some more stories while we work on archiving.

Thank you to this community and the support you've shown us over the years.

This Week on Live View

"Get Outside and Leave that Big Camera Behind" by Scott Houston and "How to Make Your RAW Files Look Even Better" by Derrick Story.

If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view. Hope to see you there.

Tesla Sued Over Report Employees Shared Private Car Camera Footage

You can read the entire article PetaPixel.com.

"Since at least 2019, the cameras in Tesla vehicles captured highly-invasive videos and images of the cars' owners, which Tesla employees were able to access--not for the stated purposes of communication, fulfillment of services, and enhancement of Tesla vehicle driving systems--but for the tasteless and tortious entertainment of Tesla employees, and perhaps those outside the company, and the humiliation of those surreptitiously recorded," the lawsuit reads.

"By virtue of this defective system, Tesla employees accessed and circulated recordings of Tesla customers in private and embarrassing situations, without their consent including, for example, video of a man approaching a Tesla vehicle completely naked, and video of vehicle crashes and road-rage incidents," the lawsuit continues.

"Tesla employees also shared pictures of family pets, which were made into memes by embellishing them with captions or commentary before posting them in group chats. While some postings were only shared between a few employees, others could be seen by 'scores' of Tesla employees. And as is common with internet culture, many of these videos and images were very likely shared with persons outside the company."

Multiple reports have confirmed that Tesla employees were able to view images of customers through the company's cars and shared them amongst each other, despite Tesla's own privacy statements.

Portrait Beast: We Review the Viltrox 75mm f/1.2 Lens for Fujifilm

You can read the entire article FStoppers.com.

The Viltrox 75mm f/1.2 autofocus lens is the first in their high-end PRO series line, and it is clear from first opening the box that this lens means business. It is all metal and feels extremely robust, with a smooth focusing barrel and an aperture ring that has just the right amount of resistance to click into place without feeling cumbersome. The lens is certainly not small or light, but I found it quite comfortable to use. I really like the way it pairs with the Fujifilm X-T5, not only aesthetically but more importantly it balances nicely with the camera, especially for a lens with a full frame focal length equivalent of 112.5mm.

What I loved the most were the beautiful colors, pleasing skin tones, and excellent contrast. Portrait photographers will absolutely love the bokeh, and as someone who enjoys shooting wide open, this lens hits the spot. Regarding image quality, this is one of the best lenses I've tested and certainly rivals the quality I get with my Fujifilm lenses.

I upgraded the firmware to version 1.0.2 after my studio session, and there was a noticeable difference in the autofocus performance. I thought that the autofocus was good even before the update, so having the slight bump in performance was a nice touch. One thing I really appreciate is how quiet the lens is. The STM motor is fast and almost silent, and when using it with eye tracking, I was able to achieve excellent and consistent results with the X-T5.

Outside of some flaring when shooting in direct sunlight, I really can't find anything negative to say about the Viltrox 75mm f/1.2. In fact, from the moment I put it on my camera, I fell in love with it, because it handles like a much more expensive Fujifilm lens in terms of design, performance, and most importantly, image quality. I think that Viltrox has hit a home run with this lens, and for those of us who shoot with Fujifilm cameras, it is a very appealing lens in terms of focal length, autofocus, and overall quality.

The Viltrox 75mm f/1.2 AF Lens is available now from B&H Photo for $549.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #889, April 4, 2023. Today's theme is "Why Being Good is Great." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It feels like we live in a world of extremes right now. Big successes and tragic failures dominate our headlines, and often our approach to work and creative pursuits. The goal is to be great, to be admired as the best, to be on top. That's fine if it happens. But my observation is that folks who are good at what they do seem to be happier. How could that be? Find out on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 889

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Why Being Good is Great

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I think the easiest way to begin this discussion is with a look at my own career. Then we can meander from there.

I am good at a few things. I'm a good writer, photographer, podcaster, educator, and musician. But, I am not great at any of these.

Most likely, I will never win a Pulitzer Prize, hang a show in a museum, win a broadcasting award, accept a professorship at Harvard, or write a Top 10 song. And yet, I am wildly happy.

But how could that be? By every measure of pinnacle success, I have fallen short. Do I not have the appropriate fire in my gut to climb the mountain of fame and fortune? Am I short on talent? Maybe I just don't work hard enough.

All of those may be true. But I don't think that's my problem. My issue is that I like being good at what I do. When I publish an effective article, make someone smile during a podcast, see someone's eyes sparkle when they learn something new in class, or giggle at one of my silly songs, I feel good. Maybe I have a small glass of whiskey before dinner. Watch something interesting on TV afterward. Then sleep like a baby.

I think the achievement of being good at what you do is undervalued. I marvel at people who are good at things that I am not. I appreciate the plumber who fixes my sink in a fraction of the time that it would take me to do so. I know that am not good at plumbing.

Doctors who prolong my vitality, administrators who fix bureaucratic mistakes, a food server who manages to overcome the shortcomings of the chef she has to work with that night - these are all people who are good at what they do. And they are the folks who make the world a better place.

In our world of photography and creativity, what does being good actually mean? I have 5 bullet points that you may find helpful. Being a good photographer means:

  • You have learned how to operate your camera so it is a natural extension of your vision, not a distraction.
  • You have learned how to adapt to different photo situations, know how to adjust your camera accordingly, to produce a good image, even if outside your normal comfort zone.
  • You can adjust your pictures in an image editor to improve them, and do so in a reasonable amount of time.
  • You can look at someone else's picture, recognize the effective aspects of it, and identify, if present, areas that may need improvement.
  • Others recognize you as a capable photographer, converse with you as such, and appreciate some of the work that you've produced.

If you are accomplished in these five categories, you are a good photographer. And if you continue to work on your craft, you will become better.

Does this mean that if you try even harder you will become great. Who knows? And what difference does it make?

What's important to me, and I suspect this may be true for you as well, is that others respect my work. If I overhear someone say, "Yeah, he's a pretty good writer," I'm ready to celebrate with a couple tacos and a cold beer.

I like being good at what I do. I sleep well at night. And I try to see the admirable capabilities in others. I think some of the happiest people on earth are those who understand they are good at what they do.

This is why, I say, being good is great.

Digicam Finder is a New Resource That Replaces DPReview's Camera Library

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Digicam Finder is a new resource that has successfully ported over a huge amount of information from DPReview in an attempt to keep a historical record of every digital camera released since the early 1990s alive.

Last month, after DPReview announced that it would cease operations on April 10 and eventually close, fans of the website scrambled to retain the site's massive library of content before it was deleted. One such endeavor kicked off almost immediately after the news broke and has already launched: Digicam Finder.

"Ever since the DPReview closure announcement there was a looming risk that we'll all lose the entirety of its 25 years of data," Peter Green, co-developer of the platform, tells PetaPixel.

Green, who is the co-founder of the private investment platform Republic, says that Digicam Finder is designed to be a new source of the most complete and accurate digital camera data on the Internet, which was built and maintained by him and a passionate group of users from the DPReview community.

"Many of us were thinking how to preserve [DPReview] and worked non-stop this past week. Well, now I'm happy to say that with the community effort, we managed to save it and it will keep being available for public access post-DPReview's closing," Green says.

Digicam Finder has mirrored the basic information of more than 2,500 digital cameras that date back to 1994. The site contains full specifications and is searchable by several parameters. Additionally, Green says that the site is built on "modern tech rails" that make it mobile-friendly and very fast to load -- both advantages over what he admits were some downsides to DPReview which he says felt "like a 25-year old website" at times.

Live View Is Launching Today

You may recall that a couple months ago I talked about a new publication I was working on for Medium.com called Live View, and I was looking for writers within our community.

It's now coming to life! Live View launches today with two stories, and will publish every Tuesday moving forward.

Our first article is by Cynthia A. Whelan titled, Why I'm an iPhoneographer (and why you might want to be one too.) Cynthia is an experienced photographer who attended my writing workshop in Dec. 2021. She's exploring the world in her rec van and will be sharing her findings on Live View.

The second article, Shooting Motorsports (how to make your images look fast) is by John Zachary. John is an experienced motor sports photographer who moved from lugging DSLRs to shooting with Fujifilm's mirrorless cameras. He says he's never been happier.

If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view. Hope to see you there.

Photography cheat sheet: Color temperature & the Kelvin scale

You can read the entire article DigitalCameraWorld.com.

White balance, or WB, is necessary on cameras as light doesn't just vary in brightness, but also in color. Each light source has its own individual 'color temperature', which varies from red to blue as you move through the visible spectrum. Human vision is very good at compensating for this, so a sheet of white paper will look white whether it's viewed in daylight or by candlelight. It's the job of the camera's White Balance system to do the same thing and compensate for the color differences in the lighting, so the colors in a scene look exactly as we would expect.

Digital cameras have a wide range of options for controlling the White Balance to suit the color temperature of the light in the scene, including Automatic White Balance (AWB), which will cleverly look after all this for you. However, as with all your camera's automatic settings, the Auto White Balance isn't foolproof, and it may under-compensate for extreme conditions because it can only operate within a restricted range of temperatures.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #888, March 28, 2023. Today's theme is "The Distraction That Is Color." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The bulk of my photography is captured in color. But there are those moments, when I look at the preview on the back of the camera and think to myself, "this just isn't right!" And the majority of the time the problem is the color itself. Sounds crazy? Well, I'll explain myself on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 888

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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The Distraction That Is Color

DSCF2408-Morro-Bay-Campsite.jpg

Here's what happened the other day. It was about noon, and the sun was high and bright. I had made a stop in Morro Bay and wanted to photograph my cool campsite.

The sky was blue with plenty of clouds. There were tall trees in the background, and there was the campsite itself with my VW ID.4 sporting a patio cover on the passenger side with a comfy Coleman camp chair and table in the shade. Sounds perfect, right?

I pulled out the Fujifilm X100V and mounted the 28mm lens to give me a bit more elbow room. Took the picture, reviewed it on the LCD, and recoiled. How could such a lovely scene photograph so poorly?

Well, the bright midday sun was definitely part of the problem. It added a nasty contrast to the scene. But the real culprit was the over-abundance of color. There was just too much. My ingenious campsite was lost in a cacophony of blues and greens. The protagonist of my visual story was being consumed by the supporting cast.

When I shoot with the X100V, I carry two filters with me: a circular polarizer and a Hoya R72 Infrared. The polarizer was definitely the wrong direction. But the R72 could solve my problem.

DSCF2411-Morro-Bay-Campsite.jpg

I screwed it into the front of my lens, set the aperture to f/2.0, switched film simulation to Monochrome+R, and recomposed the shot. Jackpot! My protagonist had returned to center stage, and the sky and trees were now a lovely supporting background.

I had eliminated the distraction that is color.

Here are 5 tips to keep in mind if you ever encounter a similar situation.

  • Know how to quickly find the B&W setting on your camera.
  • Shoot RAW+Jpeg to leave all of your options open.
  • Test your camera for IR sensitivity. If it passes, carry and R72 IR filter with you.
  • Don't be afraid to shoot midday, but know that IR and B&W do much better at this time than color.
  • Practice seeing in IR to understand how it doesn't affect manmade objects - the pavement, cars, bikes, benches, etc. - the same was that it does the living, especially plants and the sky.

Like I said at the top of this segment, I normally shoot in color. But I'm not hesitant in the least to switch to B&W if the situation calls for it. And I'm generally quite please with the outcome when I do.

Chris Niccolls and Jordan Drake Join PetaPixel to Lead its YouTube Channel

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Chris Niccolls and Jordan Drake are joining PetaPixel and will lead its new YouTube Channel. The two have been a mainstay in the photography industry for more than a decade as hosts for first The Camera Store and then DPReview.

Their current home at DPReview is shutting down, but the two have no intention of stopping their excellent video reviews and photography-based content as they will be joining PetaPixel as the faces of its new YouTube channel launching in May, providing a nearly seamless transition from their previous home to their new one.

"I'm thrilled that PetaPixel is not only giving us the opportunity to keep our photography YouTube show going, but also the chance to make some fun changes to our format in upcoming episodes," Drake says.

"Sure, we'll still be releasing reviews for the latest photo/video gear shot in the frozen lands of Canada, but we're already working on field tests, documentaries, and episodes that are bigger than anything we've done before."

"This is a big move, but one that I'm very excited about. Working with PetaPixel brings me back to the reason why I got into this industry in the first place: a deep love for photography," Niccolls adds.

"I can't wait to work with a team that is as passionate about the craft as I am. Our show will still continue the high standard of technical knowledge that we are known for, and our dedication to testing gear in the field," Niccolls continues.

PetaPixel is ecstatic to be able to provide the two with a place to continue to share their professional insight and recommendations with a community that has appreciated them for the better part of 15 years.

How to Choose Binoculars: We Review the OM System Olympus 10 x 42 PRO

You can read the entire article FStoppers.com.

A good pair of binoculars are often invaluable to photographers. There are many important things to learn about buying them. Here's what led me to the OM System Olympus PRO binoculars, why they are my perfect choice, and why my old ones were a mistake.

My binoculars were showing their age. I bought them around 20 years ago, shortly before I moved to Tanzania. They were small, light, and easy to carry around, which I needed back then. But they had shortcomings. I know now I made the wrong decision when I bought them.

Those old Steiners were 10 x 26. That first number refers to the magnification and the second to the diameter of the objective lens. Back then, I found the 10x magnification was more than I needed for the large animals I saw in Africa, and I could often not fit the entire creature in the frame.

The second number refers to the objective lens' size. 26 mm is small, so the light transmission through them was not great; think of a camera lens with a small aperture. In the bright light of the savannah, that smaller objective lens was less of an issue. However, here in the often cloudy and dull North of England where I live now, it is. Furthermore, I am no spring chicken. Their low light-gathering capacity meant that, although I see things 10 times bigger, the image was dull and lacking detail, and I gained little from using them. Everyone's vision gradually deteriorates with age, and a dark image isn't what I need.

Consequently, although they fit in my pocket, I rarely take them anywhere. If only I knew then what I know now, I would have invested in something better.

I know that my OM System camera lenses are known for being hypodermic needle-sharp. A search of many different review websites also rated that brand's binoculars as exceptionally good. Furthermore, I know it is a brand I can trust. But, even so, I wanted to put them to the test to be sure.

OM System produces three grades of binoculars - Compact, Standard, and PRO - still sold with the Olympus branding. I went for the PRO version mainly for its increased clarity of image, durability, and because they are waterproof. So, before buying, I trialed a pair of mid-sized OM System Olympus 10 X 42 PRO binoculars.

On unpacking them, I found the binoculars were pleasant to hold. The rubberized grip was warm to the touch. The focusing ring was large and easy to reach with my forefinger and thumb.

Importantly, its focusing action was smooth, with just the right amount of resistance to focus quickly and accurately. Many pairs I tried over the years are too tight and jerk when you start to turn them, and others are too loose. But not these. They fit in the Goldilocks zone.

The hinge between the two barrels is tighter, which is excellent. Once set to the correct distance between my eyes, they stayed there.

These are high-quality, professional instruments. The huge difference I noticed using these binoculars compared to anything else I had used before is their brightness. I tried this pair and my old binoculars side-by-side and watched the eider and cormorants on the water and flying. With the Olympus binoculars, I could see details in the shadows that were not visible with the smaller, older ones. Furthermore, those old Steiners seemed to put a slightly muddy cast, whereas the Olympus ones were crystal clear.

They sell for $499.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #887, March 21, 2023. Today's theme is "Gearing Up for Spring." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

For those of us north of the equator, spring is just around the corner. Even though some folks may still have a month of slush and snow before the flowers grow. Either way, it's time to get in shape for one of the best photography seasons of the year. Tips on how do that, and much more, on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 887

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Gearing Up for Spring

Derrick-Spring-Mustard-1024.jpg

I look at spring activities through two lenses. The first is physical. Bad winter weather tends to take its toll on my fitness. And if I really want to enjoy outdoor life again, I have to be in decent shape.

The second lens is my camera gear. What do I need, if anything, to have the right tools for my adventures? And once I capture those images, is my workflow ready to accept them without strain?

Let's start with lens #1 - the physical aspect of our craft. I've long held the opinion that the greater our energy, the better our creativity. Now I'm certainly no triathlete, but I do strive to be able to enjoy a full day of activity without cutting corners on my photography.

I've already started working my way back in to shape. Every non-rain day here in Northern California, I get out by bike and go for a 20-30 minute ride. I have a few different routes that I alternate with to keep things interesting. And after just a couple weeks I'm already feeling stronger.

On bad weather days, I have a 20-minute workout indoors that incorporates a variety of stretches, weights, and tension using a surgical tube. Many of these exercises were learned as part of my physical rehab from injuries. Others were learned from magazine articles and advice from friends.

Regardless of which routine I'm able to do on a give day, I plan for early afternoon. This provides the added benefit of propelling me through the remainder of the day with much more energy than I would have otherwise. Honestly, there are no downsides here.

DxO PhotoLab 6 Now has Full FUJIFILM X-Trans Support

You can read the entire article on Dan Bailey Photo Blog.

Instagram Co-Founder Doesn't Like What the App Has Become

You can read the entire article PetaPixel.com.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #886, March 14, 2023. Today's theme is "Crazy Retro Weekend." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

So I did the craziest things this weekend, at least photography-wise. I was off on a road trip with some good photo possibilities, and the only camera I brought was a 10-year-old compact. Why would I do such a thing with the wonderful capture devices I have at my disposal? I'll explain myself on this week's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 886

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Crazy Retro Weekend

DSCF2695-Rain-Road-D-Story.jpg

As you probably know, we still have an atmospheric river flowing through California. On one hand, these things can be really destructive. On the other, there are countless photo opportunities if you can navigate the water.

I had to hit the road on Saturday for family activities, and since I didn't have to drive, I could use this opportunity to take pictures during the excursions. Of all things, I decided to pack my Fujifilm X20, vintage 2013.

Why would I do that? Well, I've encountered article after article about the popularity of older digital compacts, and I wanted to fully immerse myself, pun intended, in this concept. The X20 had been one of my all time favorite cameras, as a sidekick, but this weekend it's going to be the only game in town.

Let's step back to 2013 when popular compacts such as the Canon PowerShot G15, Sony Cyber-shot RX100, and the X20 were turning our heads. All of these devices are amazing photographic tools. By comparison, the iPhone 5, which was the hot smartphone at the time, featured an 8-megapixel camera that was fine, but not in the same class as any of these compacts.

Of the trio, the Fujifilm X20 is my favorite. Here's why.

It starts with the 2/3"-type X-Trans CMOS II sensor. When I open a RAW file from the X20 in Capture One Pro, it's beautifully toned and elegantly editable. Highlight and shadow recovery are smooth and gradual, the colors are natural, and the sharpness is wonderful. The pictures look like photographs, not digital images.

As lovely as the output is, the process of taking pictures is just as pleasing. It starts with the advanced optical viewfinder that adjusts the field of view as you zoom from 28mm wide to 112mm telephoto. When you press halfway on the shutter button, a digital overlay appears with exposure settings and focus confirmation. And of course you can still compose using the 3", 460k dot LCD.

Fujifilm includes 10 of its film simulation modes, including four monochromes. I use Astia Soft for my color work, and Monochrome+Yellow filter for black and white. Owners of the X100 series of cameras will understand just how important these are. And it's this shared DNA that adds to the X20's allure.

The Advanced modes provide panorama, a variety of filters, multiple exposure, and my favorite, Pro Focus that's a forerunner to Portrait mode on our iPhones - sharp subject with soft background.

And finally, the Fujinon Super EBC 28mm-112mm f/2.0 to f/2.8 zoom lens is the crown jewel. It's fast, colorful, sharp, and covers a field of view that allows you to artistically compose in just about any situation. Plus, it's stabilized. That's something the X100V still doesn't have.

Comparing to today's cameras, the X20 doesn't have many of the X100V's bells and whistles, such as Bluetooth, WiFi, tilting LCD, and a 24-megapixel sensor. But it does have what we love about Fujifilm cameras: beautiful design, click-stop dials, Fujinon aspherical lens, X-Trans sensor, Fuji color science, gorgeous optical viewfinder, built-in flash, Q menu, and images that have a certain magic to them.

So how did it go? Well, because of the conditions, I was shooting RAW+Jpeg, using BW+Y mode. That gave me a lovely BW Jpeg and a full-color RAW file if I needed it.

In the rainy, stormy conditions of the Bay Area, the B&Ws look terrific. My 4000x3000px files are sharp and contrasty. If I need to resample any of them to make a large print, I can easily do that with today's AI software.

So did I capture anything with the X20 that I could not have created with my X100V or OM-1? No, probably not. But it was the adventure that got my creative juices going. And I may captured images that I otherwise would have bypassed because I was so engaged in the challenge of working with the camera.

It was truly fun. And I'm very pleased with the pictures.

Lenrentals' most rented-out point-and-shoot isn't a point-and-shoot at all

You can read the entire article on DPReview.com.

Camera and lens rental company Lensrentals has published a list of its most popular 'point-and-shoot' cameras but the thing we found most interesting is how few of the cameras on the list would sensibly be described as such.

We recognize that, for many people, the term 'point-and-shoot' is synonymous with the term 'compact camera,' but we've always felt that there are plenty of compact cameras that encourage or reward a more hands-on approach to their photography than simply pointing at a subject and pressing the shutter button.

Lensrentals' most rented 'point-and-shoot' cameras of the past year.

10. Olympus Tough TG-6
9. Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III
8. Fujifilm X100F
7. Nikon Coolpix P1000
6. Leica Q2 Monochrom
5. Ricoh GR IIIx
4. Sony Cyber-Shot RX100 VII
3. Sony Cyber-Shot RX10 IV
2. Fujifilm X100V
1. Leica Q2

Of the list, it's only really the Olympus TG-6 or Nikon P1000 (whose appeal in both cases is about something other than just simplicity of operation) and, perhaps, the Sony RX100 VII that one might sensibly expect to be simply pointed and shot.

The Best Affordable UV Protection Filters

You can read the entire article PetaPixel.com.

Best Protection Filters Under $50

This isn't an exhaustive list of the best UV filter options under $50, but these are solid, alphabetically-ordered choices that include a robust design, multi-coating on both sides, and promise good light transmission.

Hoya HD Protector - The Hoya HD Protector filter, which has been replaced by the more expensive HD3 model, offers strong performance if you can track one down. It's still available through various retailers, and the 77mm and 82mm sizes cost just under $50.

K+F Concept UV filter - With sizes ranging from 37mm all the way to 127mm, which is extremely unusual (and more than $50), the K+F Concept MCUV filter is an affordable option that includes 28 multi-layer coatings and strong light transmission performance. The 82mm version is frequently available for around $35, which smaller versions costing even less.

Marumi Exus Lens Protect - The Marumi Exus Lens Protect filter is a bit tricky to find these days, but if you can, it's a great option for around $50. The Japanese-made filter uses high-quality optical glass with strong transmittance.

Best Protection Filers Under $100

B+W UV Haze MRC 010M or B+W MRC Master 007 - The B+W UV Haze MRC 010M and B+W MRC Master 007 UV filter lines push the limit of the price tier, coming right up against the $100 cutoff. B+W is a well-known, very well-respected player in the filter game. You can't go wrong with B+W filters.

Canon Protector - The Canon Protect series of lens filters cost around $70 and meets the Canon standard. It's a completely good choice.

Chiaro Pro 99-UVBTS - Chiaro's best UV filter, the 99-UVBTS, delivers 99% light transmission and features a side- and top-knurled design to make it easy to remove. It features Schott glass. The 77mm version is available for around $70, give or take $10 depending upon discount prices.

Hoya NXT Plus - The Hoya NXT Plus line is good choice at around $65, this multi-coated filter also uses Schott B270 optical glass and has nice knurled sides.

Nikon Neutral Clear - Simple, effective. Nikon's protection filter line is a fine choice for around $95.

PolarPro QuartzLine UV - For $100, the PolarPro QuartzLine UV series gives you a stylish, color-neutral UV filter that protects your lens.

Sony Multi-Coated (MC) Protector - Like Canon and Nikon, Sony has a line of filters that purely serve as clear protective filters. If you like Sony gear, you can't go wrong with this Sony-branded Zeiss T* filter. The 77mm version is $70. Sony's UV filter employs Zeiss T* technology

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #885, March 7, 2023. Today's theme is "A Workflow You May Find Interesting." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

With all of the great editing tools available, plus a myriad of backup options, how do we craft a photography workflow that maximizes our options while still providing the flexibility to enjoy and share our images on all of our devices? I've cobbled together one such workflow, and I'll share it in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 885

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A Workflow You May Find Interesting

creative-cloud.jpg

Last Saturday was a wild weather day in Sonoma County. We had off and on rainstorms, a glistening landscape, big crashing waves, and at times, magnificent skies above.

So my friend Oliver and I got in the car and spent the day outdoors. I took the OM-1 with the 12mm-40mm PRO II zoom and photographed everything from redwood trees to seashore cliffs. Given the lighting extremes, I stayed in RAW capture the entire time.

When I think about the objectives for the day, there was an interesting variety that didn't naturally mesh with one another.

  • Wanted to photograph with my "real camera" and not the smartphone.
  • Needed to use RAW to cope with the wild lighting conditions.
  • Wanted to squeeze the most out of the initial processing of those RAW files with Capture One Pro or Lightroom.
  • Wanted to play with some of those images with imgmi on my iPad.
  • Also wanted to share the pictures with Oliver in a timely manner.
  • Wanted to have my favorites backed up to iCloud or Creative Cloud and available on all of my devices.

What kind of workflow is that? A crazy one. Here's what I do today.

  • Capture with the OM-1 in RAW.
  • Copy to and cull in Capture One Pro (Lightroom Classic would be the alternative.) Mark my favorites with 3 stars.
  • Decode and process the favorite RAWs using the advanced tools in C1P (or LR) including optical corrections, tonal recovery, and color adjustment.
  • Export full-sized, high quality Jpegs out of C1P and import into Photos for macOS (or Lightroom CC).
  • Let iCloud (or Creative Cloud) backup those 3 star images and share them across all of my devices.
  • Play with some of the images using my AI editors such as imgmi.
  • Create a shared album of favs in Photos and provide access to Oliver and others to view and download.

My master RAW files are housed in Capture One Pro and backed up to my Synology RAID drive. I can always return to that library to revisit other shots or fine tune the images I've already worked on.

I have my 3-star favorites on my iPhone, iPad, and all of my Macs via iCloud. I can show them off to anyone who will sit still, plus I can use my favorite editing extensions on them via Photos, such as Luminar and ON1 Effects.

And at the end of the day, I have the best images from the shoot in a variety of places, both online, in computers, and on RAID drives. Yes, I'm not overpaying for online storage because I'm not putting every RAW file I shoot in the Cloud.

It sounds like a lot of work when I say it here. But to tell you the truth, it feels effortless, maybe because I'm having so much fun.

Have You Ever Made a Series of Landscape Photos From One Location?

You can read the entire article on Fstoppers.com.

Visiting beautiful locations for landscape photography can be quite rewarding. Often these, are one-time occasions. If you want to visit the same location more than once, you have to look for something close. This article is about making a long-term series of photos of one location.

Back in the eighties, I visited a forest nearby almost daily. I remember how I made a series of four images from a nice forest path with trees lined up, one for every season. Although this is nothing new, it is kind of special to have such a series of photos of a place you visit a lot, especially when you look at it many years later.

With digital photography, it has become much easier to take photos of one specific place on a regular basis. You can take as many images as you like. At the same time, it's become much more difficult to do so. The world has become so much smaller, which means we can easily travel to the farthest reaches of the Earth to visit amazing locations, only to forget about the nice places nearby.

Often, these travels are a onetime experience. Although amazing in most situations, you never get a connection with those faraway locations. You're a passerby, and if you're lucky, the light and weather conditions are perfect for a beautiful one-time landscape photo.

The benefit of having a nice local patch is the ability to visit it as often as you like. It means you learn everything about it -- how the light is flowing at different moments of the day or how weather conditions influence its appearance. If you shoot that same place more than once, you end up with a series of photos that will become quite special as the years go by.

Paul McCartney on Linda McCartney: 'I was into photography, but she was better'

You can read the entire article DigitalCameraWorld.com.

As Linda McCartney's retrospective opens in Arizona, Paul McCartney opens up about his late wife's photography

Did you know that legendary Beatle Paul McCartney's first wife was a professional photographer? And a brilliant one at that! Linda McCartney (1941-1998), born Linda Eastman, was the first-ever female photographer to shoot a cover image for Rolling Stone magazine - with an image of Eric Clapton. She was a renowned music photographer in her own right covering the early New York doo-wop scene.

The Linda McCartney Retrospective is an exhibition opening this week at the University of Arizona's Center for Creative Photography, and has been curated by Paul McCartney and their daughter Mary McCartney, who is now also a photographer and documentary filmmaker, to showcase Linda's entire career from 1965 to 1997.

Students at Arizona's Center for Creative Photography had the chance to interview Paul McCartney (opens in new tab) about Linda, and his responses provide a great insight into her life and career, as well as her duties as a working professional photographer, wife, and mother of four. Paul is quoted saying, "Linda was a great photographer and loved it so much that she would always find a way."

The first person ever to have both photographed a Rolling Stone magazine cover, and appear on it herself in 1974, Linda McCartney was highly renowned for the work she put into her career as both a photographer and musician, founding the band Wings where she performed vocals and keyboard, alongside Paul.

She was voted as the US Female Photographer of the Year in 1967, and received the Distinguished Photographers Award from 'Women In Photography' in 1987, and even appeared on an episode of The Simpsons called 'Lisa the Vegetarian' with her husband Paul McCartney in 1995, the same year she was sadly diagnosed with breast cancer.

The Linda McCartney Retrospective (opens in new tab) exhibition will showcase 176 photos, running until August 05, 2023, and can be visited at the University of Arizona's Center for Creative Photography.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #884, Feb.28, 2023. Today's theme is "AI Photo Editing on Your Smartphone." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Using AI editing tools on a smartphone makes even more sense than on your computer. Image enhancement on mobile devices is not the easiest task in the world. Their smaller screens and less precise input (aka our fingers) present a bit of a challenge. AI tools can help, and today, we're going to look at one such offering from Skylum that can really speed things up. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 884

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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AI Photo Editing on Your Smartphone

Skylum just updated their imgmi app to include AI Skin and AI Body adjustments. Added to the existing tools - Sky Replacement, Remove Powerlines, AI Enhance, Basic Adjustments, Crop & Rotate tool, Erase, and a collection of LUTs called filters - this app is rounding out nicely, especially for one so young (Sept. 2022). Think of it like Luminar Neo for your phone.

There are versions for iPhones, iPads, and Android devices. I haven't tested the Android version, but the ratings on the iOS app store are more favorable than those on Google Play.

The iOS version taps your camera roll and allows you to save finished pictures as a new image back to the same location. Once you return to Photos for iOS, you can continue working on the picture with its tools. Together, Photos + imgmi, you have a powerful image enhancement package that's easy to use.

Before Editing IMG_0290.jpeg

After just a few clicks. IMG_0291.jpeg

Select Sky

This is a very powerful feature in the app. The AI identifies the sky area of a photo, then presents you with a number of different substitute options divided into categories such as Blue, Dramatic, Sunset, etc.

Once you choose a sky, tap Tools again for a set of refinements including Adjustments such as Relight, Defocus, Haze, plus, other goodies such as Orientation and Mask.

And if you wish, you can even add your own stock sky images from your camera roll, and they will be available as well. Nice touch!

Remove Powerlines

I think a more apt title would be "Remove Lines." The app can indeed identify power lines and remove them. But in my testing, it often didn't stop there and removed other lines that it found, such as the pin stripping on a car driving by.

Even with these minor hiccups, I'm still glad they included this feature. Power lines are tough to deal with, and this gives us a fighting chance.

AI Enhance

Any Skylum user knows how wonderful this tool is. The mobile version isn't quite as intelligent or powerful as what we use on the computer, but it's still pretty darn good.

Skin and Body AI

These are the two latest features just added this week. And I thought Skin AI was particularly helpful, especially for portraits with side lighting that were not kind to the subject.

Filters

These look like Luts to me, and I like them. Again, broken out into categories such as Creative Portraits, Great Landscapes, Pets, Selfie, and B&W, these filters are far more sophisticated than what we normally see in mobile apps - and you get a lot of them.

Adjust and Crop

A solid set of basic tools that you would expect to have in an app of this caliber.

Erase

I love having an Erase tool, especially since Photos still haven't included one. The Skylum version lets you set the diameter of the eraser, then you just drag your finger across the area you want gone. It does and intelligent content away fill to replace the removed object. And there is a Restore option if you need to fix an over zealous swipe.

Final Thoughts

I've been waiting for Skylum to bring some of their AI magic to mobile devices, and imgmi is a great start. I like it best on my iPad mini where I have a bit more operating room to use it. It's a wonderful complement to the Photos app.

Skylum offers a 7-day free trial, then an assortment of pricing options. I recommend the $24.99 a year plan. I anticipate they will continue to add tools and enhance this software. But even now, in its early stages, I think it's worth the price.

Couple Finds Trove of 2,000 Cameras and Lenses in Storage Unit

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Kristen Cusumano, who works part-time at a tanning salon, was asked by her boss in December to empty out a storage unit. "My boss, the guy who owns the salon, happens to own several other properties around town, including a storage unit. One of the guys who rented out a unit passed away a few years ago and eventually my boss had to empty out the unit.

"My boyfriend was doing some work for him at the time, and my boss asked him if he'd be interested in clearing out the unit. My boyfriend loves doing that kind of stuff, and when he found out that we could keep whatever we found inside as payment, he agreed immediately."

After clearing out all the boxes, the couple now estimates that the collection contained over 1,000 film cameras and roughly 1,000 lenses. The equipment the couple found is a film photographer's dream.

"The vast majority of the collection is Miranda and Minolta," Cusumano says. "There's also a good amount of FEDs, Voigtlander, Zorkis, Zenits, Fujicas, Yashicas, Pentaxs, Prakticas, Mamiya Sekors, Exaktas, Olympus's, Exas, Petris, Konicas, and some TLRs and other brands I can't think of at the moment.

"I'm keeping the Minolta XK, the TLRs, and most likely one of each of the Minoltas since we have so many of them and they're just so aesthetically pleasing to me," Cusumano says. "Fridrik will most likely be keeping an Orion and Miranda T and probably one of each of the Mirandas for the same reason."

It's unclear how long the camera equipment was hidden away in the storage unit, but many of them may now be destined for actual photo-making again.

Brinno's new timelapse camera is a stamina champion with 100 days of life

You can read the entire article DigitalCameraWorld.com.

Brinno TLC300 is the perfect construction camera, offering 100 days of power from four AA cells.

The best timelapse cameras are what you need if you want to create a stop-motion movie of something taking place over days, weeks, or even months. If you want, therefore, to create a video of a building being built, these are what you need. And Brinno is the best-known brand in this specialist camera market - having sold over a million cameras since its first launch in 2008.

The new Brinnoi TLC300 is designed to give users the best possible experience in timelapse, while also keeping things very simple so as to not confuse any users. For instance, the TLC300 is completely IPX4-rated waterproof housing, and pair that with its mounting accessories and its 100-day battery life, you have a camera that can outdo almost all of the current market competitors, and while others use rechargeable battery cells, the TLC300 uses four standard AA batteries available worldwide, so when that 100-days is up, you can easily swap in some more without having to reach your charger.

However, addressing the elephant in the room, this new timelapse camera can only capture 1080p. It might be unlimited until the battery runs out, but there is no escaping the fact that in a world of 4K cameras or the ability to use a mirrorless camera or DSLR and achieve a 4K timelapse - 1080p may seem a little below par. But, it is undoubtedly fine for the web and display use this sort of video is useful - and is a step up from the 720P offered by its predecessor the Brinno TLC200 Pro.

One key feature is the TLC300's ability to schedule recording, not only have you give a certain time on a specific day, but you can also schedule multiple days with breaks in-between scheduling Monday, Wednesday, and Sunday to record and skip the others.

Just Released! Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training

With Photos for macOS, you can manage, enhance, and share photos in a variety of ways. It's evolved into a powerful, but easy to use imaging application. And it's free!

In this course, I take you on a detailed exploration of how to use Photos for both the Monterey and Ventura versions, plus tips for iOS as well.

I start with an exploration of the interface, then move into the new features. Noteworthy topics include how to remove duplicates from your library, different ways to use Live Text to transform your camera into a personal assistant, how to search for pictures by object type, copy images from messages to Photos, use Quick Notes with Photos, and automate common tasks with shortcuts and built-in Mac intelligence.

Also included are updates on some of the recent improvements to the importing process, with lots of useful tips for organizing and editing your pictures. (The editing tools are terrific!) Upon completing this course, you'll be working more effectively with Photos for macOS Monterey, Ventura, and iOS.

If you use a Mac and haven't explored Photos for a while, I think you'll be surprised by its power. Take a look for yourself by visiting Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #883, Feb. 21, 2023. Today's theme is "7 Photography Sins to Avoid." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of things my mom used to say to me as a child was, "Derrick, you should know better!" Sometimes I did and forgot. Other times I really didn't know better, but that rebuttal only earned me the follow up admonishment, "There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action." (Goethe) Life is complicated, but photography isn't, and today I'm going to remind you of 7 things that you probably already know, and possibly may have forgotten. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 883

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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7 Photography Sins to Avoid

There are two types of sins in photography, technical and behavioral. We'll start with behavior.

Dex-Video-Web.jpeg

Rule 1: Don't Act Innocent When You're Not

If you're going to take a picture of something, then do it. But don't act like you didn't snap the shutter when you really did.

You can always ask for forgiveness when confronted with, "Did you just take a picture?" The answer is, "I did. Why do you ask?" (Say this politely, don't be a dill weed.) Let the inquirer explain their concern, then try to respond as intelligently as possible.

Rule 2: Don't Take Pictures When Posted Signs Say "No Photography Allowed."

You may not understand the reason why photography is not allowed in certain locations, but nobody cares about your opinion, especially the security guard who caught you on CCD camera.

If there's something forbidden that you really want to photograph, then you'll have to go through the steps of getting permission.

BTW: If you get caught, see Rule 1.

Rule 3: Do Not Use a Telephoto for Unauthorized Public Photography

I love street photography. But there's an unspoken rule that I'm now going to speak: You need to keep it fair by using a lens that gives the subject a chance to know they are being photographed. Standing a half block away with a long telephoto lens is creepy. Don't be creepy.

If you are confronted after taking a picture, see Rule 1.

Now let's cover a few technical sins to avoid.

Rule 4: Don't Let Your Camera Decide What to Focus On

Autofocus cameras are great. But if you let them run the show unchecked, you're going to miss a lot of got shots because the camera did not focus on the most artistic element in the frame.

Invest some time in learning how your autofocus system works, then intervene as appropriate. I like to use a medium cross pattern that I move around the frame with the jog stick on the back of the camera. That way I'm deciding what's interesting, not the camera.

Rule 5: Don't Rely Solely on Auto Exposure

Indeed cameras are pretty smart about exposure. But they will still turn a black anvil into a gray one, and will make that beautiful white snow a shade of yucky.

With mirrorless cameras, exposure compensation is so easy because you get realtime feedback in the electronic viewfinder. There's really no excuse for a poorly exposed shot.

Rule 6: Don't Let Lens Flare Kill Your Contrast

Shooting in the direction of the sun or any bright light source can lead to intriguing and sometime artistic images. But if the sun above can also kill the contrast of an image if glarey light is bouncing off the front of your lens.

And when the sun is low, even a lens hood might not provide enough protection. I often cup my hand around the lens hood to shade the front of the lens.

And if you don't believe it makes a difference, test this yourself with before and after pictures.

Rule 7: Don't Over-Sharpen in Post Production

I don't know why we have this weird obsession with ultra sharp images that also suffer from too much clarity and dehazing. If you want your final picture to look like it was captured with a 2003 digital camera, just be heavy handed with these adjustments.

Yes, many of our pictures can benefit from some sharpening and a dash of dehaze. But know when to say when.

Now you can no longer use ignorance as an excuse!

Meta Will Start Charging $12 a Month For Verification on Instagram

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Mark Zuckerberg's Meta is taking a page out of Elon Musk's Twitter playbook and will roll out paid verification to both Instagram and Facebook starting this week.

Announced first via Zuckerberg's Instagram Broadcast Channel this morning, the new program -- called Meta Verified -- will allow users to verify their account with a government-issued ID and get a blue badge in exchange for $11.99 a month if purchased on the web, or $14.99 if bought through iOS.

Zuckerberg positions it as "extra impersonation protection" against accounts claiming to be other accounts and will also allow those who pay for the subscription to get direct access to customer support.

"Long term, we want to build a subscription offering that's valuable to everyone, including creators, businesses and our community at large," Meta adds. "As part of this vision, we are evolving the meaning of the verified badge so we can expand access to verification and more people can trust the accounts they interact with are authentic."

Those who pay for verification will also receive increased visibility and reach in areas like search, comments, and recommendations. Subscriptions will include "proactive monitoring" for account impersonation. The company also promises more "exclusive features" but did not elaborate.

Why You Should Try Editing Your Photos in Reverse

You can read the entire article Fstoppers.com.

It sounds like a strange concept, but the reasoning behind it is sound, and it is straightforward and easy to do. This excellent video tutorial will show you how to edit your photos in reverse and why it will help you make better and more precise photos.

Coming to you from Anthony Morganti, this great video tutorial will show you the ins and outs of editing your photos in reverse. If you work in Lightroom or any program with a similar layout, you probably start with basic global adjustments like exposure, highlights, shadows, etc., then move on to more local adjustments.

And while that works fine for a lot of photos, if you are anything like me, you probably notice that often, once you make some of the local adjustments, you have to go back and refine the global adjustments because they throw the overall image out of balance. Morganti's method of starting with the local adjustments put them in balance first so that when you make the global adjustments, you maintain the relationships between different elements, reducing your workload and making the edits easier. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Morganti, and give it a try!

Just Released! Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training

With Photos for macOS, you can manage, enhance, and share photos in a variety of ways. It's evolved into a powerful, but easy to use imaging application. And it's free!

In this course, I take you on a detailed exploration of how to use Photos for both the Monterey and Ventura versions, plus tips for iOS as well.

I start with an exploration of the interface, then move into the new features. Noteworthy topics include how to remove duplicates from your library, different ways to use Live Text to transform your camera into a personal assistant, how to search for pictures by object type, copy images from messages to Photos, use Quick Notes with Photos, and automate common tasks with shortcuts and built-in Mac intelligence.

Also included are updates on some of the recent improvements to the importing process, with lots of useful tips for organizing and editing your pictures. (The editing tools are terrific!) Upon completing this course, you'll be working more effectively with Photos for macOS Monterey, Ventura, and iOS.

If you use a Mac and haven't explored Photos for a while, I think you'll be surprised by its power. Take a look for yourself by visiting Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 75 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #882, Feb. 14, 2023. Today's theme is "Your Camera's Hidden Features." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Every camera I've owned had one or two tricks up its sleeve that I didn't initially discover. Then one day I'd be reading a review or listening to a podcast and learn about it. Which make me think, what sort of magic resides inside your camera that you haven't uncovered yet? I'll share a few of my favorites in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 882

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Your Camera's Hidden Features

5-axes-IBIS.jpg

To help illustrate my point, I have tips for the Sony A7 IV, Ricoh GR III, Fujifilm X100V, OM System OM-1, and the iPhone. Even if you don't have one of these cameras, knowing about these tips can help you search them out on your device. Let's get started.

Sony A7 IV

HEIF instead of Jpeg. HEIF stores twice as much information as Jpeg in the same file size. For example, Jpeg color is limited to 8 bits, where HEIF can manage 16 bits of color.

The Sony A7 IV allows photographers to choose between Jpeg or HEIF for their compressed format. The setting is:
Menu > Shooting > Image Quality > Image Quality Settings > File Format.

In this menu, you can also select RAW+HEIF for a true power couple. Nearly every app supports HEIF now, in part thanks to Apple's iPhone use of it. And it truly is a cut above Jpegs.

Ricoh GR III

Automatic Horizon Correction. When composing on a LCD screen, it can be difficult to get the horizon perfectly straight. Fortunately, the Ricoh GR III has a Horizon Correction setting that you can enable.

It's in the (7) Shooting Assist menu at the bottom of the screen. When you turn it on, the camera corrects 1.5 degrees if the IBIS is on and 1 degree if it's off. That may not sound like a lot, but it makes a huge difference in your pictures.

BTW: Did you know that the GR III has built in memory that provides up to 40 RAW or 140 Jpegs captures in case you have an SD card problem? You can switch to Internal Memory in the Format menu.

Fujifilm X100V

Film Simulation Bracket. One of the many reasons that Fujifilm photographers love their cameras is because of the great color science express through the various film simulation settings. But what if you weren't exactly sure which one is best for any given subject?

The Film Simulation bracketing that allows you to choose three different styles and have them recorded with each press of the shutter.

Start by choosing the simulations you want via: Menu > Shooting Setting 1 > Film Simulation BKT.

Back out of the Menu, then press the Drive button, navigate down to BKT, and select Film Simulation Bracket. If you shoot RAW+Jpeg, you will capture three RAW files and three film simulations with each press of the shutter button. And the RAW film simulations look different than the Jpeg versions.

One bonus Fujifilm tip: If you mount the excellent WCL 28mm lens on the X100V, the camera automatically identifies it and adjusts the electronic viewfinder and LCD for a 28mm field of view. You can see the difference by switch between the electronic viewfinder and the optical.

OM System OM-1

One-Touch White Balance. We usually know when we should use Custom White Balance to adjust for mixed or artificial lighting, but usually don't because it feels like a hassle. But on the OM-1, it's as simple as pressing a button on the front of the camera.

The top button on the front of the camera, the one with a dimple in it, is for One-Touch White Balance. Just point the camera at a white object or a white sheet of paper that's reflecting the lighting of the room, press the One-Touch button with your middle finger, then while still holding down the button, fire the shutter with your index finger. The camera will ask you if you want to save that setting by pressing the OK button. Once you do, you're set!

Bonus Tip: Handheld Assist. When Handheld Assist is On, the status of camera shake is displayed on the monitor when the shutter button is pressed halfway or during exposure. This is useful for reducing camera shake during long exposure in hand-held shooting.

The gray frame indicates the range that camera shake can be corrected. To minimize camera shake, hold the camera so that the outer indicators (roll shake) are stabilized near the center right/left on the frame and the center indicator (horizontal and vertical shake) near the center within the frame.

How to set Handheld Assist: Press the [MENU] button. In 8. Image Stabilizer, select Handheld Assist. Select Off (default setting) or On.

The iPhone Pro

Lens Correction. In the Camera Settings menu, there's a toggle for Lens Correction. Make sure that it's on so that your images have less distortion with the wide and ultra wide lenses. If you want distortion for effect, toggle it off.

Reveal Additional Settings While Taking Pictures. Some people never discover the hidden settings menu that includes Night Mode, capture proportions, exposure compensation, self-timer, and more. You can reveal it by tapping on the Angle Bracket that's pointing up at the top of the camera interface. Hide the menu by tapping on it again.

OM Digital Solutions releases OM System M. Zuiko Digital ED 90mm F3.5 Macro IS PRO

You can read the entire article on DPReview.com.

The 90mm F3.5 Macro IS PRO is an autofocus lens that delivers up to 2x macro (or 4x with a 2x teleconverter). Its stabilization system is compatible with the Sync IS system, allowing it to work in conjunction with in-body stabilization of Olympus / OM System cameras.

The lens is constructed from 18 elements, arranged in 13 groups. Its design has two focus groups that act conjunction, allowing very close focus when the focus limit switch is in the 'Macro' position. The lens also has a focus ring that can be snapped back to reveal a focus distance scale and (on Olympus or OM System cameras) engage manual focus.

In addition to the slide to switch between MF and AF, there's also a dedicated IS toggle, an L-Fn (lens function) button for assigning custom functions and a focus limit switch which is split between macro, 0.25-0.5m, and 0.25-infinity. The lens weighs 453g (16oz) and measures 136mm (5.4") long with a 70mm (2.7") diameter.

For very close-up work, the lens has a groove behind all these controls, which should be compatible with the tripod collar from the M.Zuiko 40-150mm F2.8 Pro (though OMDS isn't promoting it as such). OMDS says it has no plans to sell the collar separately but it may be possible to source it from service centers.

The OM System 90mm F3.5 macro IS pro will be available in March 2023 with an MSRP of $1,499.99 in the U.S, and CAD $2,049.99 in Canada.We have a wonderful workshop headquarters reserved that puts you right in the middle of this natural goodness. Not only is it a peaceful place for us to gather and work, but you can walk right out your front door and photograph the amazing diversity of wildlife there.

Controversial AI Program Generates Photorealistic Police Sketches

You can read the entire article Petapixel.com.

Two developers have created artificial intelligence (AI) software that generates photorealistic police sketches using DALL-E. Forensic Sketch AIrtist was made to cut down the time it takes to create a police sketch of a suspect. It was created at a Hackathon event in December 2022 and works by inputting facial features.

"First, the artist collects a description from the witness by using our client," explains the software developers.

"Then the client sends the description to our server where the request is parsed and sent to DALL-E's API. After a few seconds, we have the sketch ready to be sent to the client and, in turn, to the artist.

"After that, the artist can opt to end the drawing process or to download the generated sketch and perform some small corrections to it."

In an interview with Vice, Jennifer Lynch, the Surveillance Litigation Director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says that the use of AI in police forensics is "incredibly dangerous."

"The problem with traditional forensic sketches is not that they take time to produce (which seems to be the only problem that this AI forensic sketch program is trying to solve). The problem is that any forensic sketch is already subject to human biases and the frailty of human memory," says Lynch

"AI can't fix those human problems, and this particular program will likely make them worse through its very design."

"If these AI-generated forensic sketches are ever released to the public, they can reinforce stereotypes and racial biases and can hamper an investigation by directing attention to people who look like the sketch instead of the actual perpetrator," adds Lynch.

Just Released! Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training

With Photos for macOS, you can manage, enhance, and share photos in a variety of ways. It's evolved into a powerful, but easy to use imaging application. And it's free!

In this course, I take you on a detailed exploration of how to use Photos for both the Monterey and Ventura versions, plus tips for iOS as well.

I start with an exploration of the interface, then move into the new features. Noteworthy topics include how to remove duplicates from your library, different ways to use Live Text to transform your camera into a personal assistant, how to search for pictures by object type, copy images from messages to Photos, use Quick Notes with Photos, and automate common tasks with shortcuts and built-in Mac intelligence.

Also included are updates on some of the recent improvements to the importing process, with lots of useful tips for organizing and editing your pictures. (The editing tools are terrific!) Upon completing this course, you'll be working more effectively with Photos for macOS Monterey, Ventura, and iOS.

If you use a Mac and haven't explored Photos for a while, I think you'll be surprised by its power. Take a look for yourself by visiting Photos for macOS Ventura and iPhone Essential Training.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Thanks to OM System for the illustration of their 5 axes image stabilization system.