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This is The Digital Story Podcast #726, Feb. 18, 2020. Today's theme is "Hands-On Review of the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

After spending 4 days in Costa Rica and continuing to shoot with the camera since then, I can comfortably say that I have a good feel for the Olympus E-M1 Mark III. It is neither the manna from heaven that many users hoped for, nor is it the disappointment that some reviewers have complained about. It's a solid semi-professional camera for nimble photography that's only limited by the user's imagination. I'll explain my views on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Hands On Review of the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III

There was a moment on the bus while talking with a fellow journalist, that I realized how the reviews were going to go for the Olympus E-M1 Mark III. He was disappointed with the not-updated sensor (as are many reviewers), the comparatively low resolution LCD (1 million dots), non-state-of-the-art EVF (2.36 M dots), the lackluster performance of AF tracking, and the relatively high price for a small sensor camera ($1,799).

EM1MIII_BLK_Right.jpg

Since I'm not an apologist for Olympus nor any other brand, I offered a few tips and left it at that. But I've decided to lead off this review addressing those five comments, because I have seen them in more than one review. We'll get to what I like after that.

Before we get into the specifics, however, I want to comment about the Olympus mindset when it comes to camera design. They take a very wholistic approach, and they will live and die by those choices. In other words, they don't so much look at the individual components; rather, how everything works together to create the experience they're striving for. I sum it up as the 3-Cs: Compact, Creative, and Capable. With that in mind, lets move forward.

The Most Common Criticisms of the Mark III

  • Non-Updated 20.4MP Live MOS Micro Four Thirds Sensor - When Olympus debuted the 20.4 MFT sensor in Sept. 2016, it scored the highest according to DxO Mark of any Four Thirds sensor, edging out the Panasonic competition and the 20.3 sensor in the PEN-F that was released earlier that year. That same 20.4 chip is in the E-M1 Mark III, but with a TruePic IX Image Processor compared to the TruePic VIII found in the E-M1 Mark II and the TruePic VII housed in the PEN-F. After shooting with all three cameras, my view is that it's the processor, not the sensor, that we should focus on with the Mark III. I discussed this in last week's podcast. Just think about the evolution of smartphone cameras and where the real progress is made. It is in computing power and software, and that's where the upgrade is for the Mark III.
  • 3.0" 1.037m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen - I will agree that reviewing images on the E-M1 Mark III is not as lovely as on the Sony A7R Mark IV with its 3.0" 1.44m-dot rear LCD. But there's a price difference as well. And there's a trick to getting the most from your E-M1 LCD that a lot of users don't know. What you want to do is review pictures at 1:1. When doing so, the screen works remarkably well. The setting is Gear D2 > Default Setting > Equally Value. On the LCD that's 7X, and you can really evaluate your image well as such.
  • 2.36m-Dot 0.74x Electronic Viewfinder - Again, let's compare it to the flagship Sony that has a UXGA OLED Tru-Finder EVF with 5.76m-dot resolution with 120 fps refresh rate. The Olympus default is also 120 fps, and with the lag time a minuscule 0.005 sec for smooth display that allows capture of fast-moving subjects. So, depending on your needs and preferences, if similar refresh rates and low latency get the job done for your photography, then the resolution might not be as much as an issue. This one is up to you.
  • Continuous AF + Tracking - I agree with everyone on this setting: it under performs. We've known that for some time, and most serious Olympus shooters use Continuous with their preferred set of sensors. With the E-M1 Mark III, there is a much better option. In my case, I used C-AF with the 3X3 array giving me 9 sensors to track moving objects (called Group 9-Point Target Mode). With the new joystick on the back of the camera, you can move the array quickly to any part of the frame. I had my best success rate ever in Costa Rica.
  • $1,799 Price Tag - The Mark III, with all of its upgrades, launches $200 cheaper than the Mark II. Enough said there.

5 Features that I Think are Really Terrific

So, with all of that out of the way, what am I excited about with the Mark III? There's plenty. Here are five of my favorites.

  • Live ND - Live ND results in blurred subject movement by compositing exposures to replicate the look of a single image taken at a slower shutter speed. Particularly suitable for photographing moving water, five modes are available: ND2, ND4, ND8, ND16, and ND32 to vary how movement is portrayed.
  • Handheld High Res Shot - Like the Tripod mode, produces a 50MP JPEG or raw file by compositing sequentially recorded files into a single image. The Handheld High Res Shot mode differs from the Tripod mode by recording 16 independent frames, opposed to eight, and the slight movement caused by hand-holding provides the range of movement needed to produce the larger final image. It's brilliant.
  • 120 FPS FHD Video Capture - Not talked about much, but I love this capability and wish it were on my E-M1 Mark II. You can capture Full HD at 120 fps, then have it set to playback at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, and 24p. So, if you set it to playback at 30p, you have this lovely slow-motion video at .25 speed. And it looks great. No post production headaches. Plus, there's handheld 4K video as well. Nice!
  • EM1MIII_BLK_Back.jpg

  • AF Joystick (Multi-Selector) - With 121 cross-type sensors and a wide variety of AF patterns, the joystick is the perfect complement to this system. It is well-designed and works great. And speaking of autofocus, Starry Sky (new AF algorithm fully dedicated to night photography) AF really works. If you're an action shooter, you're going to love the Multi-Selector.
  • Improved Supersonic Wave Filter - The E-M1 Mark III added a coating to the SSWF (Supersonic Wave Filter), which was evolved with OM-D E-M1X. It's design is to repel dust. It allows for lenses to be swapped even at dusty outside, the high reliability makes possible to concentrate on shooting.

If I had to pick one thing that really impresses me about this camera, is the flexibility and speed of the autofocusing. The ability to customize AF point arrays, then quickly move them with the multi-selector, really increased the number of successful shots I captured of moving objects.

But Wait, There's More!

I should also mention that I did not use a tripod once on the Costa Rica trip. That included using focal lengths as long as 600mm, long exposures for moving water, and even focusing on stars at night. Think about it: a camera that provides super-fast AF, long reach, and minimal equipment weight at this price point.

USB-C charging was a welcome addition as well. I used the included cable with a 10-watt iPad USB charger and was able to replenish the E-M1 Mark III. My advice is to always have a cable with you when you travel. You just never know.

There are many very nice touches that seem to be overlooked as well, such as the Anti-Flicker setting where the camera detects the frequency (flicker) of artificial lighting such as fluorescent light, and activates the shutter at peak brightness to smooth out any exposure and color differences between frames. Not a big deal, that is, unless you shoot indoor sports.

And then you get features that aren't even on the E-M1X (yet) such as advanced face/eye AF detection and Starry sky AF. Plus the things we already know about including dual card slots and 400,000 shutter life.

I fully understand that the Olympus E-M1 Mark III isn't for everyone. But it certainly is for me. I was relying on the 40-150mm PRO and the 12-45mm PRO zooms for the bulk of my work, and was traveling as light as a feather. My shots look incredible. And I never got tired during the long days. It's a heck of a camera, heck of a camera system.

Two thumbs up for me.

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO Zoom

Amid the understandable excitement surrounding the OM-D E-M1 Mark III, Olympus also debuted a new optic specially designed for Nimble Photographers desiring the highest quality in a compact package - the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO zoom ($649). This lens is a gem.

Here are the spec highlights:

  • 12 to 45mm (35mm Equivalent Focal Length: 24 to 90mm)
  • F/4 constant aperture
  • Minimum focusing distance of 4.72" / 12 cm with 1:2 Macro Reproduction Ratio
  • 12 Elements in 9 Groups with 7 rounded aperture blades
  • 2.5 x 2.76" / 63.4 x 70 mm and weighs only 8.96 oz / 254 g

It mounts beautifully on the PEN-F, E-M5 Mark III, and E-M1 Mark III. The autofocus is fast. But what I really like about it are the images it produces - colorful, sharp, and with excellent contrast. I also like that it features a nicely dampened manual focusing ring that feels great - a welcome feature in pro AF lens.

Other niceties include a ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) coating that has been applied to individual elements to minimize lens flare and ghosting for improved contrast and color fidelity when working in strong lighting conditions. Plus it's dust, freeze, and drip-proof design ensures the lens performance in inclement and harsh conditions.

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4 PRO zoom will begin shipping on Feb. 24th. You can pre-order is now... just in time for our travel season!

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

Those of you on the registration list for the Humboldt Redwoods Workshop, keep an eye out for the registration packet that will go out later this week. We have a great event for you, and I'll be working with you to ensure that you are fully prepared to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity. Plus, we had one seat open up (moved to another workshop), so if you want to join us, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the other workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #725, Feb. 11, 2020. Today's theme is "Why Smaller Sensors Will Make a Comeback." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

2019 was certainly the year of the full frame camera. At great cost to the bottom line, we saw new large sensor offerings from Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, and Sigma. Meanwhile, Fujifilm and Olympus doubled-down on their respective APS-C and Micro Four Thirds devices. That seems crazy, doesn't it? Well, maybe not. Because I think, thanks to computational photography, we're going to see the second coming of the smaller sensor. Tune in to find out why.

Why Smaller Sensors Will Make a Comeback

Just a few days ago I found myself on a lovely beach at twilight. I was standing there with a very modern Olympus camera shooting sunset pictures with rolling waves in the foreground.

With low ISO and an astonishing shutter speed of 1/2 second, my handheld shots displayed a lovely softened ocean thanks to the water motion combined with a longish exposure, a colorful sky with a perfectly sharp setting sun, and virtually no noise to contend with.

micro-four-thirds.jpg

How could all of this be possible with a Micro Four Thirds camera housing a sensor that is already many years old? The specific answer was a feature called Live ND, that in-camera composites exposures to replicate the look of a single image taken at a slower shutter speed. The broader answer is computational photography.

For sometime now, photographers have been asking for smartphone features in their interchangeable lens cameras. Now, in 2020, that request is being answered. And the ramifications are tremendous.

If, for example, you didn't need an expensive large sensor beast to photograph handheld in low light, wouldn't you at least be a bit curious? Think about the benefits for travel photographers who didn't need to lug large lenses and tripods all across the planet.

Here are five reasons why I think smaller sensors are going to start a comeback in 2020.

  • MFT and APS-C Are Gigantic Compared to the Sensors in an iPhone - Look at the amazing quality that you can get from that tiny sensor in your iPhone. That is the perfect example of the power of computational photography. Now apply that same computing horsepower to Micro Four Thirds and APS-C.
  • Smaller Sensors Can Be Virtually Noise Free - Remember that old trick in Photoshop where you overlay a series of night exposures and they cancel out the noise in the sky. We can now do that instantly in-camera, and with even better results.
  • Smaller Sensors Mean Smaller Lenses - The biggest drawback for me with large sensor cameras isn't as much the camera as it is the lens required for full coverage. You can reduce both weight and cost with smaller sensor cameras.
  • Practically Any Effect Can Be Digitized In-Camera - You want creamy bokeh, edge to edge sharpness, diffraction reduction? There's an algorithm for that.
  • Tremendous Cost Savings for Photographers - If you don't think prices are going up because of reduced demand thanks to smartphones, then think again. One way to offset those price increases is with smaller, smarter cameras.

And none of this takes into account the amazing things that we can do with our images once they're in the computer. Optical corrections, noise reduction, sampling up, and special effects can be applied to our small sensor photos with high quality results.

On my last trip, I was traveling with a small backpack that would fit in the overhead bin of a bus. I had four professional lenses inside, along with two camera bodies, with an effective range of 14mms wide to 600mms on the telephoto end. I worked from 7am to 9pm, much of it on foot, and my back and shoulder felt as good when I went to bed as when I had awakened.

The camera industry desperately needed something new to reenergize slumping sales. It grasped for full frame. And for some photographers, that's the right call. But it isn't the only high quality option.

We live in a digital age where computing smarts can defy the laws of physics. If you want to carry around a heavy kit, that's your choice. But it's not necessary, and will become even less so as this decade unfolds.

You Want High Quality Wide? The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO

With an effective viewing field of 14mms to 28mms in full frame terms, this relatively compact, fast, zoom is perfect for travel photographers, landscape assignments, and for anyone who has to work in tight quarters.

The Olympus 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO measures 3.11" x 4.17" and weighs only 1.17 pounds. Its angle of view is a beautiful 114 degrees to 75 degrees.

It is weather resistant, fast focusing, and beautifully sharp. It's currently available for $1,299, and should supply years of outstanding service.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

Those of you on the registration list for the Humboldt Redwoods Workshop, keep an eye out for the registration packet that will go out later this week. We have a great event for you, and I'll be working with you to ensure that you are fully prepared to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity. Plus, we had one seat open up (moved to another workshop), so if you want to join us, hop over to the 2020 Workshops Signup Page and get on the Reserve List.

If you have questions about the other workshops, feel free to drop me a line using the Contact Form on www.thenimblephotographer.com.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #724, Feb. 4, 2020. Today's theme is "Is DxO PhotoLab 3 the Alternative You've Been Looking For?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

We spend a fair amount of time talking about Lightroom, Luminar, Capture One, and Photos. But there's another quality image editor out there that should be in the conversation as well: DxO PhotoLab 3. It features powerful tools, digestible interface, and reasonable cost. And we're going to pull back the curtain on this terrific app on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Is DxO PhotoLab 3 the Alternative You've Been Looking For?

photolab3-overview.jpg

I first became a fan of DxO software with OpticsPro for Photos. It's this wonderful editing extension that I use to this day that provides top notch lens corrections within the Photos app.

As a result of this good experience I've been following the French software company, and with the release of PhotoLab 3, decided to get serious about learning it. I can tell you right now, this was time well spent.

PhotoLab 3 is available in two versions: Essential ($129) and Elite ($199). Both are excellent, but you get some additional sophisticated tools with Elite, plus 3 activations (instead of two). So I'm going to focus my comments on the Elite version.

PhotoLab 3 is a complete image organization and editing application. It's PhotoLibrary displays the contents of the hard drive it is pointed too. For photographers who have an organized Finder-based system, this is a perfect match.

But you can also create Project in the PhotoLibrary that allow you to work with images from different sources without disrupting your Finder-based organization. So you can have it both ways. Plus you have star ratings and pick/reject functionality with filtering capability that make it easy to cull your shoots.

But the real fun begins when you click on the Customize tab and have the opportunity to edit your images with PhotoLab's powerful tools. In addition to the usual suspects that you would expect there, here are some of my favorite features.

  • DxO Optics Modules - In many ways, this is the heart of PhotoLab. As you upload RAW files, the app identifies the lenses and cameras used, then asks for permission to download the corresponding modules. These provide outstanding lens corrections that truly improve your pictures.
  • DxO Smart Lighting - Intelligent dynamic range expander that recovers highlight detail and unblocks shadows. You have complete control over its intensity.
  • DxO ClearView Plus - Improves contrast and sharpness of images by removing the effects of atmospheric haze and fog. Again, you have control over how much or little you use.
  • PRIME Noise Reduction - Probably the best in-app noice reduction I've used. It is flat out impressive.
  • Control-Point Technology for Localized Editing - Precise control points give you tremendous control over your corrections.

Other goodies that I really appreciate includes the integration of Nik Collection and FilmPack 5. You can work with the Nik tools from within the PhotoLab environment. It's very convenient.

For those on Macs, there's an Add to Photos button that makes it super easy to send any image within PhotoLab over to your iCloud environment for sharing among your devices and backup. This function works flawlessly, and I love using it while on the road.

Additional features include excellent Metadata display with Keyword functionality, tons of built-in presets, strong compare tools, customizable workspaces, copy and paste corrections, virtual copies, and retouch tools.

I've been using it on my super-nimble 11" MacBook Air travel computer, and it performs like a champ on that machine. Bottom line is this, DxO PhotoLab 3 should be part of any serious photo management conversation. It's outstanding.

TDS Soundbites

We have a new feature that publishes every Wednesday called TDS Soundbites. They are technology tidbits that are 5 minutes or less. I cover digital photography, audio, mobile computing, smart home, and more.

If you haven't checked them out yet, all you have to do is look for the newest Soundbite in the Recent Entries box on thedigitalstory.com, or enter SoundBites in the Search box and click on the Search button.

So far, I've covered in-Camera RAW Processing, Slow-Sync Flash, and Business Card Flash Modifier. And I have a new SoundBite ready to go this Wednesday.

They're perfect for your next coffee break!

The Oben CT-3565 Carbon Fiber Tripod - Inner Circle Reviews

Editor's Note: This guest blog post by David Hearne is part of our Inner Circle Reviews program. You can learn more about David at the end of this article.

In the last decade plus, a major trend in photography has been towards high quality but lighter, easier to carry equipment. Our Derrick Story describes it as nimble photography. For nature and landscape photographers, such as myself, a tripod is an essential tool, and to borrow from a popular saying "the best tripod is the one you have with you".

High quality but more compact tripods have evolved right along with our cameras. The Oben CT-3565 Carbon Fiber Tripod (3.2 lbs) clearly fits in the category of compact, light weight but stable support for Micro 4/3s and other small cameras.

My impressions are formed by comparison to 2 tripods that I own: a Gitzo 1228 carbon fiber with a Markins base/Arca Swiss Mono Ball (5.5 lbs) and a MeFOTO Roadtrip Classic aluminum with Q1 ball head (3.6 lbs). The Oben 3565 and the MeFOTO Roadtrip are similar tripod systems with very similar performance.

Job 1 for tripods and ball heads is stability. I evaluated stability using my E-M1X mounted with a 40-150mm/2.8 m.Zuiko PRO lens (4 lbs total). Note, the center column was not raised for this evaluation. With camera and lens mounted, the Oben 3565 ball head easily locked the camera in place and maintained framing.

However, with both the Oben and the MePhoto tripod legs pushing down on the camera will flex the fully extended legs. My Gitzo rig is decidedly more stable. By zooming out to 150 mm the deflection can be detected on the LCD at times when pushing the shutter and may generate enough movement to cause a slightly out of focus shot. Collapsing the skinniest leg greatly reduces this flex. To completely eliminate this flex a best tripod practice is to use a 2s shutter release delay, especially on travel tripods. However, the collapsed length (16 in) and lower weight are acceptable trade offs for me and the Oben is easily carried on my hiking daypack. My Gitzo rig is just too heavy and bulky for me to hike with.

The Oben 3565 is indistinguishable from the MeFOTO Roadtrip in several features including the rapid twist locks and working height. Compared to the MeFOTO, the Oben 3565 has some nice touches.

Like the MeFOTO, a bubble level is integrated into the Arca Swiss release plate. Additionally the plate tightening screw also has a level that can be utilized when vertical shooting using the 90 degree slot. The locks for the leg spread positions (3) are spring loaded and legs repositioned more easily than on the MePhoto.

The Oben 3565 comes with an alternate short column which allows a minimum working height of 9.5 inches. The MePhoto short column is a $30 accessory. Finally the Oben has integrated spiked feet. The MePhoto comes with interchangeable spiked feet.

In summary, the Oben CT-3565 Carbon Fiber Tripod ($210) is a quality travel/hiking tripod for micro 4/3s cameras at a very good value price point.

About the Author

David Hearne is a photographer based out of North Carolina. You can visit his website, American Roots Photography, to see his images and learn more about him.

David is also a member of The Digital Story Inner Circle where he gained access to the Oben 3565 Carbon tripod for this review.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #723, Jan. 28, 2020. Today's theme is "Is Pro Gear Worth the Premium Price?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Camera manufacturers build pro gear for the handful of professionals who need its durability for their work, and for bragging rights that create a halo effect for aspiring shooters who want the very best. But for weekend warriors and enthusiasts, is the premium price tag a wise investment? We'll explore this question and more on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Is Pro Gear Worth the Premium Price?

I have made a lot of clients happy over the years using cameras such as the Canon 5D Mark II, Nikon D610, Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, and the Pentax KP. No one every asked my why I wasn't shooting with a Nikon D5 or Canon EOS-1D X Mark II. And the investment difference was substantial, to say the least.

canon-pro-dslr.jpg

Similar considerations apply to lenses. One of my favorite examples is the Canon EF 70-200mm. You can buy the amazing EF 70-200mm f/4L IS II for $1,299. It is one of the sharpest 70-200s on the planet. Or you could spend $2,100 (when not on sale) for the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III. That extra f/stop cost $800.

Which lens is best for you? Ask yourself these five questions to help you match the proper investment with your photography needs.

  • How much is emotion driving my decision? - I'm putting this one right up front because it's something that most of us are vulnerable to.
  • Do your research - Research can be the anecdote for emotional decisions. Here's an example: The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm f/1.8 lens is on sale right now for $299. It is compact, amazingly sharp, fast, and affordable. But it isn't weather resistant, and to be honest, isn't as sexy as the PRO model. The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO Lens is on sale for $1,049, roughly 3.5 times the price of the f/1.8 version. It is larger, sexier, faster, and weather sealed. Both optics are sharp. But if you take the emotion out of it and let your research determine which is best for you, you could save more than $700.
  • Renting specialized gear instead of buying - Am I a generalist or do I need special gear for niche assignments? You can get top quality gear for general photography at affordable prices. But if you have a specialized area of interest, you will most likely need more budget. Figure out what you are realistically going to shoot. Once you figure that out, maybe it's better to rent specialized gear for those occasions.
  • Consider resale value - I did exceptionally well when I sold my Canon DSLR gear. I kept the original boxes and paperwork for all items. But you should look at the market and try to figure out where it's going when debating about new gear. If you're fairly confident that you will be able to resell it at a good price, you can factor that in to the bottom line cost.
  • Used vs New - One of my favorite lenses, the Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II ASPH. lens was purchased used because I needed it at a time when my budget couldn't accommodate a new version. It has served me well ever since.

Using these five steps, I've been able to meet all of my assignment needs while maintaining a tight budget that I could justify to anyone. It feels good to do business this way.

Speaking of Moving Gear Along

We have had some key contributions for community members lately. They have donated analog gear or older digital gear to The Digital Story. Not only does this prevent needless landfill waste, but it puts creative tools in the hands of those who really appreciate these items.

A warm thanks to Kevin, Mark, and Colin for their recent contributions. And those of you took the time to ship your unused items to me last year, I want to thank you again.

Lady Gaga Criticizes Music Pirates with Pirated Photos. Shutterstock Responds

You can read complete article here on PetaPixel.com.

After Lady Gaga's new song "Stupid Love" leaked onto the Internet and went viral last weekend, the singer called out fans who had listened to the unauthorized release. Problem was, Lady Gaga's Tweet used "pirated" stock photos that had "Shutterstock" watermarks splashed across them, and this unauthorized usage didn't escape the company's notice.

"We hear you!" Shutterstock writes. "We like artists to be paid for their work too. Here's a link to the photographer's work where you can license these quality images."

It turns out the photographer behind the stock photos is children's author Richard Nelson, and he doesn't seem to mind not getting paid for the usage -- in fact, he Tweeted out a non-watermarked version of Lady Gaga's message for the singer to use:

@ladygaga As the photographer of this picture, I've got you.

But from the conversations this incident has sparked online, it seems clear that the vast majority of photographers agree with Shutterstock: copyright is important, but not just for musicians -- it needs to be respected and defended for all artists, including photographers.

Update for the TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - 1 Seat Remaining - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - 0 Seats Remaining -- Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining -- We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Oct. 1-3, 2020 - 2 Seats Remaining - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #722, Jan. 21, 2020. Today's theme is "Non-Confrontational Street Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Many photographers who I've worked with over the years like the idea of exploring urban environments with their cameras, but aren't comfortable approaching strangers for pictures. I understand the sentiment, and have worked on a strategy that I call Non-Confrontational Street Photography. And the best part? People shots will still be part of the mix. I hope you enjoy the show.

Non-Confrontational Street Photography

Not everyone is cut out to walking up to a stranger and saying, "Can I take your picture?" Yet, the images that we can capture in urban environments can be truly memorable.

IMG_0315-1024.jpg

So how do folks who are a bit more on the shy side work the city streets? Here are five tips for what I call Non-Confrontational Street Photography. We'll be practicing these during my upcoming LA Street Photography Experience Workshop in March.

  • Let them come to you - Many new street photographers think that they always have to be on the move, hunting their subjects like lions in Africa. But that's just not necessary. Find an interesting spot, park yourself with camera ready, and let the world come to you. Be friendly, smile, and make eye contact.
  • Be ready for street performers - Make sure that you have a few $1 bills in your pocket for street performers. They can appear on the corner of a busy intersection, or inside a subway car. They are perfectly fine with photos. Be sure to offer a tip and ask for a hashtag.
  • The more colorful, the easier to approach - When you see someone with an outlandish outfit or dressed very uniquely, they tend to want attention. You can politely approach these characters, tell them how much you love their look, then ask for a snapshot.
  • Have business cards ready - If you're not a stranger to them, they will be more comfortable with you. Carry simple business cards that have your name, email, and website printed on them. Hand the card to a potential subject, and tell them that you are an amateur photographer who loves to take portraits, and you would love to capture their picture. If they ask for a copy, then tell them to send you a note to the address on the card.
  • Have someone friendly with you - In my case for example, I'm a tall, big guy. So I find it helpful to have a friendly woman with me who can make small talk and help people feel at ease while I capture their portrait.

As for cameras, my PEN-F is perfect for this assignment. It's not intimating, looks interesting, and sometimes becomes a bonding topic of conversation.

As I mentioned earlier, I'll be teaching these practices, and more, during my upcoming LA Street Photography Experience Workshop in March. Also, you may want to check out my article, Join Me in March for the LA Photography Experience Workshop that has images and information from last week's scouting trip in Southern CA.

How Sharp is Too Sharp?

This falls into the category of knowing your lenses and not applying the same amount of sharpness in post to all of them. I explain more in this second segment.

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #721, Jan. 14, 2020. Today's theme is "Inkjet Printing in 5 Easy Steps." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I've had a number of listeners comment to me that they really would love to try their hand and inkjet printing, but don't know where to start. I totally get that. So I thought I would dedicate the first segment of today's show to the easiest of ways to enjoy success. Just five easy steps! I hope you enjoy the show.

Inkjet Printing in 5 Easy Steps

IMG_2843.jpg

In all honesty, printing at home used to be more difficult than it is today. Much in the same way that technology has made picture taking more reliable, image output has become easier as well.

Once you have your feet wet and have experienced success, then you can fine tune this process. Or not! Because even at the beginning stages, I think you'll be thrilled with what you see emerging from your printer.

Here are my 5 steps to injet printing success.

  • Work from a photo management app - Programs such as Lightroom and Photos for macOS have tried to streamline the printing interface presenting you with logical choices. Plus, all of your images are housed there, making access very easy.
  • Get your hands on a printer that promotes itself outputting photo quality prints - If you don't want to invest in a dedicated 13" printer, then buy an all-in-one model that brags about its photo output. If it has 3 or more ink cartridges, then you're in business. Make sure you computer can see it, either via cable or WiFi.
  • Set up your first test print - Most likely you will see two dialog boxes during this process. The first is from the photo management app, and the second is via the print driver. The first dialog is important for choosing the printer, paper size, surface, and possibly a few other parameters. The second will probably have some duplicate fields. The the think that you want to look for is "Printer Managed." Choose that, and everything will be much easier. If you don't see that, look for color matching. The key here is to have the printer in charge of the handoff.
  • Examine your test print and make adjustments - If you need to brighten your output, which is the most common adjustment, then do so with the printing software, not with your image editing tools. Make a note on the back of your test print the adjustments you made.
  • Output your second print - This version should be pretty darn good. Unlike digital images on a screen, prints are affected by the paper used in the process. Gloss stocks have more punch and contrast. Matte surface have more muted colors and softer lines. Warm-toned papers affect the color rendering, as well as cool white surfaces. If you're not satisfied with the final look of the print, try a paper stock that solves the problem.

A few bonus tips. For a better fit on the paper, duplicate your image and crop it to the dimensions of your printing paper.

Review the Printer Features area in the printer dialog box. It's usually available via a popup menu. Here you can change dpi (I like 600x600), quality setting (fine is usually good, best isn't typically required), and tweak the brightness.

If you have a choice anywhere between Adobe RGB and sRGB, choose Adobe RGB for printing.

Once you get a print to your liking, make another and stash it away. These make great archives of your images. Be sure to let it air dry completely before storage.

Inner Circle Reviews

We have a new feature for our Patreon members, and there's benefit for non-members as well. Derrick describes in this second segment. Our first review will be of the Oben CT-3565 Carbon Fiber Tripod ($209).

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #720, Jan. 7, 2020. Today's theme is "Live from CES 2020." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Many trade shows these days seem to be fighting an uphill battle, but not CES Las Vegas. The town is hopping with tech vendors and buyers from all over the world. And for us, as photographers and technology lovers, there's plenty to unpack. Today I'll highlight some of my favorite discoveries during the media events prior to show opening at the Convention Center. So, hide your credit cards and join me here in Sin City.

Live from CES 2020 Las Vegas

Las-Vegas-Night-1024-2.jpg

We're taking the mic on the road and filing a field report from CES Las Vegas. I take you inside the halls of one of our media events, then afterward share some of my favorite discoveries during the press previews before the show.

I discuss the SmartMike+ by Sabinetek, the Cobra SC 400 Dash Cam, the Smacircle e-bike, the Nikon D780, and the Kingston Canvas Select Plus 64GB SD card. Tune in to learn about all of them.

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #719, Dec. 31, 2019. Today's theme is "Managing the Art/Life Balance." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

My hope is that the lessons that I've learned over the past decade will provide a strong start to the next. One area of particular importance is deciding how to use the resources that are available to me. Whether it's my business, my craft, or my personal life, learning how to skillfully reinvest in those areas is a top priority for 2020. Today, we'll take a closer look at the unique challenges that artists face with this balancing act.

Managing the Art/Life Balance

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Before we get to the Art Part of the equation, let's talk about life in general, and the options available to us. Is the goal to make as much money as possible? How do they balance the acquisition of possessions vs experiences? And how much risk can they live with along the way?

I've always found that it's easiest to take a big challenge and break it into parts to make it feel more manageable. The biggest challenge of all, day-to-day happiness, falls into these five categories for me.

  • Time - Managing sleep vs waking hours, labor vs creativity, work vs personal life.
  • Energy - Health is a key factor and plays an important role in the amount of time that's available to us. Good health equals more energy.
  • Money - Short term capital that's liquid and available to spend.
  • Assets - Longer term capital that provides relative security as we navigate the ups and downs of daily life.
  • Well Being - The result of finding the right balance of the above factors.

Why Artists are Unique

Now let's get to the Art Part.

Artists have an additional layer to contend with. If you're not an artist, you may be satisfied with a good job, happy relationship, and reasonable health. An artist, on top of those things, needs to create. This activity often requires both tools and time. Adding this layer to an already challenging life is an art in itself.

Here are five things to keep in mind along the way.

  • Do make time for your craft. Life will pull you in different directions. And others might not value your creative pursuits as much as you do. As long as you keep things in balance, learn to ignore statements such as, "Derrick loves to play with his cameras." and things like that.
  • Don't over-emphasize tools. Cameras and lenses are necessary in the right amount. But experiences using those tools are just as valuable, if not more so.
  • Don't be weird. Overly inward, non-communicative, odd behavior is off-putting to others. And you never really know where your next opportunity lies. Take interest in other peoples' lives, even if it's not your cup of tea.
  • You don't need to be rich, but you do need to pay your bills. Beware of over-extending your assets in the name of art. Make sure you focus on generating enough money to meet your budget, even if it requires some mundane activities.
  • Nourish your friends and family. As much as we would love to immerse in our passions in our free time, sometimes you need to help the kids with their homework, accompany your partner to the grocery store, and call your mom.

As you've probably figured out by now, reinvesting in your craft is really managing your resources in life overall. By maintaining our health, paying attention to those around us, and by responsibly allocating assets to our artistic endeavors extends our ability to enjoy the rewards of creativity.

May your New Year be fueled by the lessons you've learned from the past. Happy 2020 my friends!

We Now Have a Secure Server for TDS

Even though we don't handle transactions on thedigitalstory, we moved the site to a secure server that now uses https instead of http. In large part, we undertook this project because of the mail I received from concerned visitors who saw "Not Secure" in the URL bar of certain browsers.

All along, I've assured folks that nothing bad was going to happen as a result. But, things got to the point where it was better to make the change.

You can thank our Inner Circle Members for this upgrade. Their contributions paid for the project.

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #718, Dec. 17, 2019. Today's theme is "Is Capture One Pro 20 the Logical Alternative to Lightroom?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Among all the camera discounts and holiday hub-bub this December, there was some software news as well. Phase One released a major update to its photo management app, Capture One Pro 20. What's interesting about this latest version is that it's aimed squarely at disenchanted Lightroom photographers. Is it truly to logical alternative to Adobe products? I'll explore the possibilities on today's TDS podcast.

Is Capture One Pro 20 the Logical Alternative to Lightroom?

When I look at some of the refinements in Capture One Pro 20, no doubt they are hoping to lure a few Lightroom users their way. Things like the simplified color panel, more friendly crop tool, and even a keyboard shortcut change that matches Lightroom for switching from a single photo to thumbnails (G).

C1p20-LR-Import.jpg

But is Capture One Pro the logical alternative? Let's take a look at five strengths of each application, then resume this discussion.

Capture One Pro 20 Strengths

  • RAW Processing. The hands down winner IMHO.
  • Layers and luminosity masks, so easy, so powerful.
  • Fully configurable workspaces - very customizable
  • Outstanding color tools, especially for portrait work.
  • Almost magical exposure controls, especially Contrast, Highlights, and Shadows.

Lightroom Strengths

  • HDR and panorama processing.
  • Cloud integration with outstanding mobile apps.
  • More training, 3rd party plugins, bigger ecosystem.
  • Price. Yes, believe it or not, I think Lightroom is more affordable.
  • Better integration with Photoshop and the entire Adobe ecosystem.

So if you're dissatisfied with Lightroom, the place to start is why are you looking to change?

If it's price, then you might want to stick with Lightroom. Capture One Perpetual license is $299. And let's say that I upgrade every other version. So to upgrade from version 11 is $199. So this investment should last me 48 month, provided that I only upgrade every other year. And the price still works out to $10.35 a month.

If I go with the subscription plan for C1P, which keeps me current through all the version, that will cost me $20 a month if I pay monthly, or $180 a year if I pay all at once. Again more costly than the $10 a month I'm currently paying for Lightroom, Photoshop, and LR Mobile.

If speed is your issue, I don't think you'll really be any happier with Capture One Pro. I never really notice a difference working on one app or the other.

So which one you use will most likely come down to features. In my case, I like the library management better in Capture One, not to mention the RAW processing.

But, I also have Lightroom for my panoramas, cloud connectivity, and HDR processing.

If I had to choose just one, I would pick Capture One Pro. But I'm glad that I don't have to do that. Because there are a lot of things that I like about Lightroom as well.

Adobe Photoshop for iPad gets AI-powered Select Subject feature

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

At launch, Adobe said more powerful features would be added over time and back in November the company Adobe provided more detail on timelines and features that are to come.

As promised, the AI-powered Select Subject feature which lets you isolate objects in the scene from the background has now been made available. In most cases, a selection can be made just with one tap, even if the subject has a complex outline. In a second step filters or other edits can be applied to either the isolated subject or the background.

Adobe says the function works and performs on the same level as for the desktop version, despite the iPad's processing limitations. Machine learning was used to train the tool's algorithms using a wide range of objects and scenes but the company says it is still working on optimization for difficult subjects like hair or fur.

Additionally, the app has been updated with faster cloud upload and download some user interface tweaks. More information is available on the Adobe website.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

LA Street Photography Experience - This 3-day event on March 13-15 is going to be exciting. If you want to join Mike and me this coming March, just visit the information and registration page, or go to www.thenimblephotographer.com and click on the Workshops link, or go to the Olympus site - no matter how you get there, Mike and I are looking forward to working with you this coming Spring.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #717, Dec. 10, 2019. Today's theme is "It's Time to Stop Worrying About the Photo Industry." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Those who really care about the art of photography and its future have been inundated with doom and gloom in 2019. Rumors about brands going out of business, how smartphones have destroyed our culture, and the lack of innovation that's to blame for our problems. Today, I'm going to look at some of the changes that we've seen in 2019, and try to put this whole thing in perspective. I hope you enjoy the show.

It's Time to Stop Worrying About the Photo Industry

missing-wheel-1024.jpg

Let's start out by taking a look at some of the photography broad brush strokes from this year.

  • AI Image Editing - Luminar 4, OnOne, Topaz. It's kind of appealing at first. But if you're not careful, it's like eating raw cookie dough.
  • Mirrorless cameras go full frame - New Canons, Nikons, Panasonic, Sigma. On one level, I'm excited by this because we have new gear to contemplate and discuss. But at the end of the day, I really like what I already have. Personally, my big thrills this year were the Voigtlander Ultron 40mm f/2 SL IIS Aspherical Lens and the Kamlan 50mm f/1.1 Mark II for Micro Four Thirds.
  • Smartphones get smarter - Google Pixel 4, iPhone 11 are incredible. But, I'm still doing well with my iPhone X.
  • Film Photography hangs tough - The comeback maybe a bit overblown, but there's still traction there. And I really like my LabBox that enables me to develop a roll of BW film in daylight at the kitchen counter.

So where do we go from here? In all honesty, just keep doing what you're doing and let the marketplace figure it out. There will always be plenty of cameras and lenses for those who enjoy serious photography. It's really not our problem.

Websites and podcasts are hungry for news to report. But that doesn't mean that we have to be distracted by it. I don't think, for example, the Olympus rumor should have ever been published. A news story would have been if Olympus had taken steps to close down its imaging operation. Not the rumor that they may do so some day.

Who really cares if Nikon is #2 or #3? What's important are the products they are creating. And if companies like Skylum want to place all of their bets on AI imaging enhancement, then that's fine. But if their product doesn't meet my needs, then I'm not buying it.

We are so inundated with meaningless information that we sometimes forget that it doesn't have to affect our lives. As we approach 2020, I'm going to enjoy the new products that are released, and the new techniques that are revealed. But I'm not going to worry about the photography industry. It will be just fine.

Skillshare for Photographers

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Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. You can take courses in photography, videography, audio production - you name it, they've got it. So whether you're picking up a new skill for your day job, figuring out your next side project, or pursuing a long-time passion, Skillshare has classes for you.

The photography courses are amazing. One that I recommend is "Portrait Photography on the Street: Connecting with Strangers" by Zun Lee, who explores Harlem in New York City and shares his secrets for capturing the essence of a place and its people. His techniques for getting your best shot make this a perfect, quick class to inspire both the novice photographer and the expert to get out and shoot. And this is just one of many top notch titles on Skillshare.

Join the millions of students already learning on Skillshare today with this special offer for TDS listeners: Get 2 months free. That's right, Skillshare is offering The Digital Story community 2 months of unlimited access to thousands of classes for free. To sign up, go to skillshare.com/tds.

And a big thanks to Skillshare for sponsoring this show!

Why I Prefer Micro Four Thirds for Product Photography

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II combined with the Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 II ASPH. lens is an ideal combination for the product photography I do daily for TheFilmCameraShop. I've tried many different setups over the years, and this one has just the right amount of everything.

That being said, my Micro Four Thirds camera saves me a lot of time. First of all, I don't have to use a tripod. This is huge, time wise. Before, when we were shooting full frame (or medium format!), we had to stop down the aperture and focus very precisely because of the shallow depth of field that results from larger sensors and wide apertures. As a result, I had to break out the 3-legged beast.

What's so beautiful about my mirrorless rig is that I can shoot at f/4.5 or so (thanks to the depth of field), raise the ISO to 1600, and lean a bit on the sensor-based image stabilization. This allows me to handhold the camera, saving lots of time while still providing excellent results. The MFT sensor gives me that little bit of extra depth of field that's so important in product photography. I love it. And this is something that I also enjoy with certain types of portrait work as well.

Secondly, the realtime exposure compensation feedback makes it easy to nail the exposure during capture. (Very important for brightly-lit white backgrounds!) As a result, I have virtually no post production time. Again, this is a big deal on busy days. Thanks to the sharpness of the Leica lens and the accuracy or the E-M5 Mark II, the files virtually go from camera to product page.

Our LA Street Photography Experience is Coming this March

This 3-day event on March 13-15 explores classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area.

You will learn new techniques for safe and effective street photography, how to capture the vibe of great architecture, and enjoy some classic California cuisine along the way.

Olympus Educator, Mike Boening, is our co-instructor. Those of you who have worked with Mike at our SF Street Photography events know how much he brings to the table. Not only is he an official Olympus Educator, he's an accomplished street photographer, and he's going to bring gear for you to test and learn about.

If you want to join Mike and me this coming March, just visit the information and registration page, or go to www.thenimblephotographer.com and click on the Workshops link, or go to the Olympus site - no matter how you get there, Mike and I are looking forward to working with you this coming Spring.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS

Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.