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This is The Digital Story Podcast #797, June 29, 2021. Today's theme is "A Workshop for Everyone." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of the biggest challenges we've had over the years is finding a way that every person who wanted to attend a workshop, could. We may have reached that point. On this week's show I'm going to outline our events for the next 12 months. We have a mix of online and physical events, and a good variety of topics as well. Hopefully good enough to have you join us and spend time with others from our community. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 797

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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A Workshop for Everyone

Street Photographers 2018.jpeg

If you visit our TDS Workshops Page, you'll see a variety of topics and events that I'm predicting you'll find tempting. Let's take a closer look at what's on the docket.

Inner Circle Members Pump the Brakes on Podcast Sound Effects

If you were mildly annoyed by the canned audience applause and laughter last week, you were not along. In a recent poll of Inner Circle Members, 60 percent voted to eliminate them.

"I prefer the velvet tones of your voice without the sound effects; you have a fantastic 'radio voice' with a lot of warmth, humor and inflection."

20 percent thought they were fun, but to be used with restraint.

"Very occasional use of sound effects might be OK, for instance applause to announce a new workshop or release of an anticipated camera or lens, but if you're doing it more than a few times a year it's probably too much (IMO)."

And the final 20 percent thought it was OK to continue to sprinkle the effects throughout the show.\

"Sprinkling in sound effects can be entertaining on a limited basis. Kind of reminds me of old time radio shows."

I promise to try to be better behaved moving forward. And thanks to our Inner Circle Members for helping to keep this show on track and moving in the right direction.

Peak Design's latest camera bag is barely big enough for a camera!

You can read the entire article on Digital Camera World.

Meet the Field Pouch V2: an ultra-compact camera bag for when you want to travel really, really light

Peak Design, renowned for its innovative and high quality camera bags, has introduced the second incarnation of its Peak Design Field Pouch. The Field Pouch V2 is an ultra-compact camera pouch designed to carry daily essentials like your phone, a notebook, keys, spare batteries or a couple of filters - ideal for summer weather when you'd rather not store such items in a coat.

A compact camera or a small mirrorless body with an attached pancake lens could fit inside, while a larger camera can be mounted to the outside of the Field Pouch V2 via Peak Design's Capture Clip quick release camera clip attachment (sold separately).

The bag features two clip mounting points, along with an improved pocket layout over the original Field Pouch. All fabrics are recycled, including the soft felt internal lining and waterproof 400D exterior nylon. A clever roll top flap opening enables quick access to your kit, plus it also allows the bag to expand to up to double its minimum volume so you can choose to carry more gear or alternatively eliminate unused space..

Inside, 8 stretch pockets, zip pockets and stretchy cords keep smaller items in place and organised. An included strap enables you to carry the bag on your shoulder or as a sling, but the Field Pouch V2 is also designed to be used as a secondary bag within a larger backpack so you can organize smaller items and stop them rattling around, potentially damaging a camera or lenses.

You can order the bag for $44.95.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The online workshop experience has evolved into something far more meaningful than what we had previously envisioned. By keeping these events small and personal, we can connect with others who share our interests without the expense and hassle of travel.


"I've taken two of these virtual workshops and have had an extraordinarily great experience. By keeping the the number of folks attending to a minimum and by mixing zoom meetings with follow-on discussions, I feel that the interactions I had with Derrick and the Group were much more intimate than I had thought possible," -Harry T.


Now, for the second half of 2021, we're going to build on this online model and offer three new events for photographers and writers. Take a look at this lineup and consider joining us.

Mastering Capture One Pro - August 4-25, 2021

Capture-One-Pro-D-Story-1024.jpg

Over the course of four sessions, you'll learn to organize, process, enhance, and share your images with Capture One Pro 21, the state-of-the-art photo management platform for professionals and serious enthusiasts. This application runs on both Mac and Windows platforms, with an iPad version coming in early 2022.

Our weekly meetings during the workshop itself are via Zoom, with AM and PM sessions available so you can match this event to your busy schedule. Plus, we record each session and make them available to participants for future reference.

You can You can reserve your spot today for $145, that also includes a lifetime membership for our online workshop site, DerrickStoryOnline. TDS Patreon members receive a discount for this event and all TDS workshops.

Turbocharge Your Workflow with ON1 Effects - Sept. 22-Oct. 13,2021

ON1-Effects-Promo-1024.jpg

Regardless if you use Lightroom, Photos, or Capture One Pro, ON1 Effects can turbocharge your creativity with its expansive set of editing tools that will take your images to new heights.

Over the course of four sessions, you will learn to use ON1's filters, presets, LUT's, and localized editing tools to enhance your images, while staying within the comfort of your existing Lightroom, Photos, or C1P workflow. This application runs on both Mac and Windows platforms.

Our weekly meetings during the workshop itself are via Zoom, with AM and PM sessions available so you can match this event to your busy schedule. Plus, we record each session and make them available to participants for future reference.

You can You can reserve your spot today for $145, that includes a lifetime membership for our online workshop site, DerrickStoryOnline. TDS Patreon members receive a discount for this event and all TDS workshops.

Writing for Artists Who Want to Publish - Dec. 1-22, 2021

Case-Against-Full-Frame.jpg

This online workshop is designed to help photographers, and all types of creatives, improve their writing skills for online sites including publications such as Medium.com. Useful for the business environment as well because improved clarity in writing often translates into successful business interactions.

Over the course of four sessions, you'll learn how to translate your thoughts into effective articles and posts that will engage readers. We will cover online style, article construction, self-editing tips, and promotion.

Our weekly meetings during the workshop itself are via Zoom, with AM and PM sessions available so you can match this event to your busy schedule. Plus, we record each session and make them available to participants for future reference.

You can You can reserve your spot today for $145, that includes a lifetime membership for our online workshop site, DerrickStoryOnline. TDS Patreon members receive a discount for this event and all TDS workshops.

A Few More Thoughts from Previous Participants

"I have attended a couple of Derrick's online workshops and found them most enjoyable and educational. It was great to be able to be stretched by the assignments and learn new techniques and new ways of looking at my photography. The attendees were all supportive and encouraging. Derrick created a fun and safe place to interact with other photographers. The online environment provides a wonderful opportunity for those who are unable to travel to the in-person events. I highly recommend signing up!" -Robert W.

"I've been in a creative rut for a while. Being challenged in the workshops and talking with like-minded photographers helped get my creative juices flowing again. I learned a few skills in B&W and IR, but the benefits overflowed into my other photography too. I'm a better photographer now." - Bill D.

"Derrick is calm, patient and supportive. I like his teaching style. The two online, virtual workshops I've taken with him were fun and I learned quite a bit, especially from his online infrared workshop. Additionally, the other attendees were very helpful by providing great suggestions on how to improve my photographs. All in all, Derrick provides a nurturing, supportive and positive atmosphere for his students to expand and grow. I am looking forward to taking additional workshops with him, both online and in person." Brenda J.

Final Thoughts

As we roll into 2022, the physical events will return. But the online workshops will continue to evolve as well. We've discovered something special here. These classes are personal, affordable, and convenient. And I think they fit very well into our evolving world of learning and engaging in new experiences.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #796, June 22, 2021. Today's theme is "Digital Teleconverters Are Better than You Might Think." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Thank you so much! Humans can have amazing memory when it comes to bad things. A linger disdain for dogs because one chased you in second grade, or a bias against digital teleconverters because you zoomed out to 10X in 2005 and were horrified by the results. But things change, and this week we're going to revisit the modest, but useful 2X teleconverter that may be languishing in your mirrorless camera. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 796

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Digital Teleconverters Are Better than You Might Think

Crop-Comparison.jpg Image on the left captured with a 2X digital teleconverter on a Fujifilm X100V. Image on the right is the RAW file from the same camera.

Today I'm going to talk about the joy of digital teleconverters (pause with laughter). No, I'm serious!

I'll start with a story from Father's Day. (Tell the story of taking pictures at the Presidio in San Francisco.)

So I dashed out the door with the Fujifilm X100V and my iPhone 12 Pro Max in my pocket.

On our walk along Crisy Field, I notice a nice view of the Palace of Fine Arts with the San Francisco skyline in the background. I composed the shot with my X100V, but the lens was just too wide for the composition that I wanted. So I used the built-in digital teleconverter set to 70mm.

This digital teleconverter, like the 2X on my Olympus cameras, provides the magnification at the native resolution. So, if the RAW file is 26MP, so is the magnified Jpeg. (Footnote about the firmware improvement that allows you to use this function in RAW+Jpeg mode.) If you want a true safety net, then shoot RAW+Jpeg and record the scene with each version.

Back home, I opened both images in Capture One Pro, cropped both the RAW file and the magnified Jpeg to the same proportions, and compared the two files. Here's what I observed.

  • The cropped Jpeg measured 5,479 x 3,331, giving me ample resolution to print and play with. The cropped RAW file measured 2,748 x 1,755, which is fine for web work, but not much beyond.
  • At Fit in Window magnification, the two files looked equally sharp. It would be difficult to tell the difference.
  • At 200 percent magnification, the Jpeg held its own compared to the RAW file at 400 percent magnification, which was needed to provide the same framing. The Jpeg had a bit more smearing of detail, and the RAW had some pixelation due to its magnification.
  • Another difference I could tell between the files was the tonal gradation was a little smoother with the RAW file, than with the Jpeg. But this would likely happen without any magnification is is just the difference between these two formats.
  • The RAW does provide access to tools such as defringing and RAW sharpening that are not available for the Jpegs.

I've posted the full size comparison files on my Flickr account, so you can download them and look for yourself. But the bottom line is, the Fujifilm digital converter gave me the reach that I wanted, but at a small real world cost quality wise.

Canon Rebuffs Rumors That Its R3 Sensor is Made by Sony

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.

Since Canon's initial development announcement for the EOS R3, rumors have swirled that the company -- despite its statement otherwise -- was not the manufacturer of the backside illuminated sensor at its core. A report published on June 17 stated factually that the R3 sensor is made by Sony, and Canon has responded.

As PetaPixel reported on April 13, Canon stated that the upcoming EOS R3 sensor "will feature Canon's first-ever full-frame backside-illuminated stacked CMOS sensor that it designed in-house."

Nearly a month after Canon's R3 development announcement, Canon News and Canon Watch noticed that some language had been adjusted on Canon UK's website. What once stated "designed and manufactured by Canon" was adjusted to "developed by Canon." This was the first in a set of reports that would surmise that Canon was not the maker of the sensor.

On June 17, these rumors finally culminated in a story published on EOSHD that definitively stated based on documentation of a new Sony sensor -- the IMX554DQC -- the EOS R3 sensor would not be made by Canon but instead would be a Sony product.

Editor's note: After publication, the EOSHD report was edited. The below quotes are from the original story.

Olympus Lens Sale Ends June 27

There's less than a week left for the summer Olympus Lens Sale that includes free 2-day shipping for orders over $100 and 45-day returns.

Most optics are discounted between $50 and $100, but a few of the premium lenses were marked-down $150.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

On my way out the door a few mornings ago, I grabbed both the Fujifilm X100V and the Fujifilm GFX 100S with the Fujifilm GF 50mm f/3.5 lens to do a little comparison shooting. Here's what the two images looked like.

Fujifilm GFX 100S with 50mm Lens
Barn - Fujifilm GFX 100S

Fujifilm X100V
Barn - Fujifilm X100V

You can download the original size for each version. The X100V output is 6240x4160. The GFX produces files measuring 11648x8736. Both images were recorded as RAW files, then processed similarly in Capture One Pro 21. I then output full-sized Jpegs and posted them on Flickr with permissions to download the original files.

While I was working on them, they felt very similar. The Fujifilm color palette was consistent across both cameras. The whites were clean with appealing colors and excellent sharpness.

The GF 50mm f/3.5 lens has an effective focal length of 40mm, so the perspectives were similar. (The X100V has a 35mm equivalent.)

The big difference between the medium format GFX 100S and the cropped sensor X100V was (to no surprise!) the file size. 6240x4160 for the X100V is far less resolution than the 11648x8736 output from the GFX 100S. But beyond that, color palette, menu options, and overall rendering were very similar. I could tell that I was working with family members.

Bottom line: The advantages of the GFX 100S include more resolution and interchangeable lenses. The X100V is more portable and costs less. But as you can see from the pictures, both cameras have colorful, crisp image quality. I was intrigued at how similar the pictures were from each device. For me, and the type of shooting that I do, it really did come down to resolution.

I know there are many situations where the advantages of the GFX would be important. But, I'm also comforted to know that my X100V hangs tough against its more expensive medium format big brother.

Download the pictures and see what you think.

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Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #795, June 15, 2021. Today's theme is "The Breathtaking Perspective of Ultra-Wide Lenses." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

We all have our favorite optics, and often we begin a photoshoot with our comfortable old friend of lens. But, before you pack up and move on to the next location, I encourage you to break out your widest optic as well. In today's TDS Photography Podcast, I'll tell you why and an easy way to bring ultra wide into you life. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 795

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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The Breathtaking Perspective of Ultra-Wide Lenses

Last week, Olympus announced their new Digital ED 8-25mm f/4 PRO Lens ($1,099). At its widest end, this zoom gives you an effective focal length of 16mm. And that's a perspective worth exploring.

Why, you might ask? I'll share a real life example. We had some beautiful clouds this morning in Sonoma County, and I've had my eye on this barn I wanted to photograph when the conditions were right. Today was that day.

Waltzer-Barn.jpeg Fujifilm GFX 100S with GF 50mm lens. Photos by Derrick Story.

So I dashed out the door with the Fujifilm GFX 100s with the GF 50mm lens and my iPhone in my pocket.

After about 15 minutes of intense photography, I took a deep breath knowing that I had captured some frames that I was going to really like. The 40mm equivalent of the GF 50mm was a comfortable focal length for composition. And with the great lighting and active sky, I was feeling a definite "mission accomplished" sense of well being.

But before I left the site to return to the studio, I pulled out my iPhone 12 Pro Max and fired up the Ultra Wide camera. It has an equivalent focal length of 13mm, and I thought I might be able to capture something wonderful with it as well.

IMG_0467.jpeg The Ultra-Wide Camera on an iPhone 12 Pro Max.

After reviewing the entire shoot on my MacBook Pro, I was indeed happy with the Fujifilm shots. But my eye kept wandering back to the two ultra wides I had captured as well. I opened up my favorite of the two and spent a couple minutes enhancing it. And lo and behold, I sprang to life.

So much so, it's my favorite of the shoot. That is the breathtaking perspective of an ultra wide lens.

So, what do I look for in these optics? Three things:

  • A focal length of at least 20mm.
  • Size that is compact enough to always have with me.
  • I prefer that it not be a fisheye, but I don't rule those out either. In other words, I prefer rectilinear and distortion mild.

Before I had the iPhone 12, I carried the Olympus Fisheye Body Cap 9mm f/8 Lens ($99). Even though it's a fisheye, I used that rendering to my advantage and have come away with some wonderful images over the years.

I also have the Samyang 7.5mm f/3.5 UMC Fisheye MFT Lens ($229). It's a very nice manual focusing lens for MFT that provides a very wide perspective.

So dig around in your lens stash and retrieve the widest optic that you have available. On your next shoot, pull it out, try to keep the subject plane and camera plane parallel, and add an entirely new perspective to the shoot.

You just may find the results: breathtaking!

Venus Optics' new $549 7.5mm F2 MFT lens now has electronic aperture control

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Venus Optics has announced an updated version of its Laowa 7.5mm F2 Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lens that has electronic aperture control and an onboard chip for transferring metadata from the lens to the camera.

As for dimensions, the lens comes in at 3mm (.12") larger in diameter and 7mm shorter (.28") than the manual version. Also, despite adding the electronic aperture control and onboard CPU chip, Venus Optics managed to reduce the lens' weight to 150g (5.3oz), down from the 170g (6oz) weight of the manual version.

The Laowa 7.5mm F2 lens with electronic aperture control is available to order on Venus Optics' website for $549. You can view a gallery of full-sized sample images on Venus Optics' Flickr album.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

My Top 5 Articles on Medium.com

I'm celebrating my first year anniversary on Medium.com, where I've published 34 articles in the last 12 months. I enjoy writing for this site. With expert authors covering practically every topic imaginable, I'm thrilled to be a Top Writer in both Photography and Art. It's a wonderful publishing environment.

As part of the festivities, I'm sharing my Top 5 articles from 2020-21. I hope you enjoy them.

#1 Article

Case-Against-Full-Frame.jpg

The Case Against Full Frame - If we've learned nothing else from the surge of smartphones in photography, we've seen that size doesn't matter, brains do.

Quite honestly, I'm disappointed in the camera industry as a whole. They are lumbering down a path of expensive full frame cameras and exotic optics when they should be innovating in the opposite direction.

#2 Article

Replace-the-Bag.jpg

Replace the Bag, Not the Camera - Combining a smartphone with a well-thought-out camera provides me the options that I need in a kit that can always be with me. In this age of smartphones, my camera isn't going anywhere. As for my camera bag...

#3 Article

the-unforgotten.jpg

The Unforgotten - DSLRs are not as hip as film cameras nor as compelling as mirrorless, hence nobody knows what to do with them. They are auctioned off on eBay for cheap or simply sit in the back of the photo cabinet with their lithium batteries trickling down.

This was the reality facing mine a year ago. I was digging around for a lens and caught a glimpse of its prism hump in the darkened corner. I pushed a few items aside to reveal its full presence. "Still looks pretty good," I thought.

#4 Article

aperture.jpg

The Heartbreak That Was Aperture - I remember when I received the news from Apple: they were discontinuing their professional photo application, Aperture. The phone call was a heads up before the official press release broke. I thought it was a joke.

#5 Article

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Photographers - Don't Be an Easy Mark - Photography is not a contact sport. Yet these days, a camera bag in public feels like an invitation to conflict. We're seeing photographers robbed in parks and confronted on downtown sidewalks. Their backpacks are being ripped from vehicles during smash and grab robberies, sometimes while the owners are still in the car.

None of these victims "were asking for it." They were going about their craft with cameras, lenses, and accessories they believed were helpful to produce the images they desired. But do they really need all that gear with them?

Thanks to All of Those Who Have Followed Me on Medium

I want to express my gratitude to everyone who follows me on Medium. I truly appreciate it.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

On today's TDS Photography Podcast, we sit around the audio interface and share stories of cheer and disappointment from my birthday.

IMG_0459.jpeg

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I've always been a fan of using fill flash, but over the last couple years I've fallen into the habit of using exposure compensation instead, rotating the adjustment ring until my subject appeared properly exposed in the electronic viewfinder. This approach works fine, but there are definitely some tradeoffs.

fill-flash-Derrick-Story.jpg Fill flash used with an Olympus compact camera, Kodak Portrait 400 35mm film. Photo by Derrick Story.

With backlighting, for example, I often lost almost all the background detail. And sometimes that information contributes to the overall context of the shot. The above image is a good example.

The background setting is important. It lets us know that we're in a family environment and at a home. If it went pure white, as it would with exposure compensation on the child, I would be left with the boy and the basketball hoop, but not much else.

Plus, fill flash adds a twinkle to the eyes and a flattering exposure of the face. Most photo subjects benefit from the front lighting that evens out features and brightens the eyes.

What reminded me of all these benefits was my compact Olympus 35mm film camera. I had it with me for a family gathering and was using it to grab a few memories. We were congregated in a nice shady patio with bright midday light outside.

My little 35mm Olympus has an optical viewfinder, and that's it. No LCD screen, no EVF, no realtime exposure compensation feedback. But what it does have is an intelligent popup flash. That's what I used. And I love the results!

Without it, the bulk of my exposures would have had underexposed subjects and nicely lit backgrounds. Not exactly what I was looking for. But using fill, my subjects look great, and I sill have some nice context for the environment - a lovely balance.

As a result, fill flash is back on my radar. I can (and should) use it on my Fujifilm X100V and the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III, both with built-in flash units.

All of this is thanks that great looking roll of film that came back from the lab. Go figure.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #793, June 1, 2021. Today's theme is "Get Serious: The Fujifilm GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless." I'm Derrick Story.

GFX100S-Front-P5311568-GFX100S.jpg

Opening Monologue

When you first pickup the GFX 100S, you know you're playing in a different league. Its heft combined with confidence-inspiring specification builds anticipation that something wonderful is about to happen. And the pictures do not disappoint. The question is: Is this camera for you? We'll explore that topic on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Get Serious: The Fujifilm GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless

The Fujifilm GFX 100S ($5,999) is a 102MP mirrorless camera featuring a 43.8 x 32.9mm BSI CMOS sensor. It produces files that measure 11,648 X 8,736 pixels, yet feels like a pro caliber DSLR in the hands.

I've been shooting with the hefty but amazing GF 80mm f/1.7 R WR lens ($2,299) that provides an effective focal length of 63mm, and the relatively compact Fujifilm GF 50mm f/3.5 R LM WR lens ($999) with a 40mm effective focal length. Both optics are outstanding.

Basic specs for the GFX 100S include:

  • 102MP 43.8 x 32.9mm BSI CMOS Sensor
  • X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • 4K 30fps Video; F-Log Gamma, 12-Bit Raw Out
  • 3.69m-Dot OLED EVF
  • 3.2" 2.36m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization
  • 425-Point Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • ISO 100-12800, Up to 5 fps Shooting
  • 400MP Pixel Shift Multi-Shot
  • 19 Film Simulation Modes
  • 16-bit RAW files
  • Dual Slot SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II) memory

cat-portrait-GFX100S-1600.jpg

In so many ways, it feels like a mirrorless camera. What I thought was interesting was that since I shoot regularly with a Fujifilm X100V, I felt right at home with the GFX 100S. The menu system, controls placement, and general behavior are very similar. Honestly, the GFX felt like its bigger brother.

There are differences of course. The GFX tops out at 5 fps burst mode, the picture taking experience is more sounds and feels more like a DSLR, and the lenses are much larger as well.

The camera's interaction with the Fujifilm Cam Remote app was just as sure-footed as with the X100V. I especially appreciated the realtime geotagging that the tandem accomplishes with ease.

In terms of shooting experience, the autofocusing was both responsive and accurate with both the 50mm and 80mm optics. In addition to click aperture settings, each lens sports the "A" and "C" options that allow you to use automatic mode or customize the aperture changes with the front dial on the camera. Very nice!

The camera is very comfortable to hold, especially if you have large hands. The grip is deep and is complemented by an excellent thumb rest on the back. You could hold the camera with one hand and shoot, which is saying something for a medium format machine.

I love the back LCD. Not only is it sharp and bright, but it tilts both up and down, and sideways. Very clever and useful. Once again, the camera behaves like a modern mirrorless allowing for easy and fast composition on the back LCD. In fact, it's really fun to shoot this way.

GFX100S-Top-P5311579-GFX100S.jpg

The top LCD is also wonderful. You have your choice of white lettering on a black background, or black lettering on a light gray background. So you can use it in any type of lighting.

As you might suspect, image quality is outstanding for both Jpegs and RAWs. I very much enjoy editing the files in Capture One Pro 21. So much data to work with!

Is this camera for you? I discuss this in the podcast.

Capture One announces native M1 support, promises significant performance improvements

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Add another high-end photo editing application to the list for Apple M1 Macs. Capture One has announced that Capture One 21 is now ready for Apple Silicon. A new update, available now, allows the popular editor to run natively on the M1 chip.

When Apple announced its silicon and the new M1 Macs, which currently comprise MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, Mac mini and iMac models, Apple remarked how simple it was for software to be ported from Intel to Apple's silicon. It was a far deal more complicated for some software, such as Capture One.

Capture One says that given the power of Apple's M1 chip, and the 'seismic shift' the new technology represented, it was time to 'completely rethink' its software. To get Capture One running natively on M1 Macs and for it to take full advantage of the hardware, Capture One had to go further than ever before.

Capture One had to be rearchitected from the ground up. Today's update a fundamental redesign of the software and one that Capture One believes is well-positioned for the future. As Capture One writes, 'the future looks fast.' Capture One on an M1-powered Mac has many impressive performance improvements. The new Advanced Imported is 50% quicker. Key tools such as Crop and Rotate are twice as fast. Making local edits with brushes and using Style Brushes is smoother than ever.

The new Capture One 21 update is available now to all existing users.

Editor's note: I've seen tests that report that importing is 30 percent faster with this version of C1P on an M1 compared to the previous version.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

Did You Shoot the Lunar Eclipse?

I had clear skies last Wednesday morning allowing me to shoot the lunar eclipse with my Olympus 40-150mm PRO lens and an OM-D E-M5 Mark II camera. You can see the shot here. It made Flickr Explore.

Using OI Share made it a wonderful experience. I'll discuss it on the podcast.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Lunar Eclipse with Wispy Cloud

On Tuesday's TDS Podcast, I talked about techniques for photographing the May 2021 lunar eclipse. I went with the method I discussed using the Olympus PRO 40-150mm lens and manual exposure (ISO 1600, 1/1.3, f/2.8).

D-Story-P5265723-lunar-eclipse.jpg

I had also discussed using the Olympus OI Share app on my iPhone as the remote release. This is what made the shoot so enjoyable. Instead of craning my neck to peer though the electronic viewfinder or fiddle with the LCD, I had the entire show right there on my iPhone. Plus I could use the device to adjust shutter speeds, recompose the frame, set focus, and of course, take the actual shot.

Plus, being able to review my work in the field on the iPhone was also a real confidence booster. That way I knew for sure that I was getting what I thought I had photographed. (And what a lovely celestial show it was!)

You can listen to the podcast here.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.