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It's become more difficult than ever for spectators to bring decent camera gear into pro arenas. The one device that doesn't raise any eyebrows is our smartphone. But is it worth the effort to try to capture sports action with an iPhone?

Well, that depends.

Sharks-Pressure-1024.jpeg San Jose Sharks match captured with an iPhone 12 Pro Max. Photos by Derrick Story.

The iPhone does a great job for certain kinds of shots, such as wider overviews, crowd activity, and portraits of friends and family in attendance.

But if you want those pro-caliber action shots, it can't compete with a top-drawer DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens camera. That said, you can come away with some memorable images.

Get the Best Seats Possible

Honestly, the closer the better when it comes to capturing action with a mobile device. The minute you have to start pinch-zooming for a decent composition, the photo game is over. But, if you can frame a decent shot with the 2.5X optical camera on the iPhone, you have half a chance.

Good Lighting Is Important

Bright, well-lit arenas allow for faster shutter speeds (to freeze the action) and for lower ISOs (to help control image noise). Many professional hockey and basketball venues have very good lighting. You can take advantage of this to squeeze a bit more image quality out of your smartphone camera.

Burst Mode Increases Your Odds

Anticipating when something is going to happen and recording a short burst of frames might yield that magic moment. The iPhone allows you to keep the best frame in a series and delete the others. I highly advise taking advantage of this feature.

Sharks-Entry-1024.jpeg I love the mood of this image, but the lighting and motion presented problems for the iPhone. Wish I had my OM-1 mirrorless for this one.

Realize that Some Shots Just Won't Meet Your Expectations

There are often great moments when the lights go down and something special happens. Go ahead and try. But realize that the iPhone is challenged by moving object in dim lighting. You may luck out, but don't count on it.

Final Thoughts

When I don't have my regular camera rig with me, I get the most that I can out of the iPhone. My hit rate goes way down for sporting events, but even if I get one or two mementos from the event, I feel it's worth the effort.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #834, March 15, 2022. Today's theme is "Putting Together Your Back Pocket List." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Sometimes when you make things too big, they don't happen. Take for example our photography bucket list that includes exotic destinations such as Africa and India. Great stuff, but we don't want to sit idle while we wait for them to happen. So in the meantime, you can build your back pocket list. What is that you ask? Keep listening to today's TDS Photography Podcast to learn more. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 834

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Putting Together Your Back Pocket List

DSCF0089-GFX100S-Voigtlander-40mm-Armstrong.jpeg

I've been thinking about the place where we are in 2022. We're able to move about with quite a bit more freedom, but things aren't exactly back to normal yet. We're in this intermediate zone.

And even though I'm not quite ready to get on a plane and fly to Africa right now, I do want to get out. I want to take pictures.

So I was thinking about this concept that I call the Back Pocket List. It's like a bucket list, but much smaller and more attainable. It contains locations that you can reach in an afternoon or on a day off - accessible, but still beautiful.

I started building my Back Pocket List of five places that I like in Sonoma County. And I've set the goal of visiting and photographing each one before the end of the year.

To give you a better idea of what I'm talking about, here's my Back Pocket List:

  • Armstrong Woods - There are some wonderful redwood groves in Northern California (we're going to one of the best in a few weeks for our workshop), but Armstrong Woods is in my backyard, only a 30 minute drive away. I've already crossed this one off my list.
  • Fort Ross - Was once a true Russian Fort, well preserved, with great ocean views as well.
  • Duncans Landing, Bodega Bay - One of my favorite ocean views in all of California (and that's saying something). A great place to bring a picnic lunch.
  • Sugarloaf Ridge State Park - Wonderful place for overnight camping, day hikes, and mingling with forest nature. Lots of deer, fox, birds, and more.
  • Ferrari-Carano Winery, Dry Creek - A spectacular building paired with superb gardens. Plus, once you've finished taking pictures, you can sample their excellent wine.

So, what photo opportunities do you have within a few hours drive? Consider building your own Back Pocket List and revisit these sites.

And if you happen to have a new camera, oh what fun to test it out and add to your library of favorite shots.

Don't Use iCloud for Long-Term Photo Backup

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com

My friend Bill just returned from a family vacation in Costa Rica and shot lots of photos and videos on his iPhone, including some killer shots of breakfasts with local monkeys.

No surprise that once he got home, he checked his iPhone storage and found that it was 98% full. Just a few more snaps and he'd be totally out of storage space.

His solution? "I'll just put them all on iCloud, and then delete them off my iPhone," he told me.

"Backing up" on iCloud and then deleting the photos locally on the iPhone is actually the worst thing Bill could do to free up space. Because once they're uploaded to iCloud, the next time it scans his phone for an automatic backup, it will notice that the Costa Rica pix are gone and in turn delete them from the cloud backup as well.

Ever notice the fine print when you try to delete a photo? "This item will be deleted from iCloud Photos on all your devices."

For pure long-term photo backup, because of these weird, arcane rules, Apple's iCloud is about the worst place to go because it is not designed for that. Apple's help support reps told me over several calls that iCloud is meant for backup of your devices, not just your photo library, and as a way to have the same data available on all your Apple devices, not just the iPhone.

As Apple puts it: "Automatically upload and safely store all your photos and videos in iCloud so you can browse, search and share from any of your devices." Notice the word backup doesn't appear there anywhere?

So Here's What I Recommend...

First, I get the largest capacity iPhone I can afford. Then, second, I choose Optimize Storage on all of my devices. Optimized versions are created for your device, while the masters are stored (and are available) via cloud storage.

The 2022 TDS Workshop Season

We have great events lined up for this year, and there are a few more coming. Here's a recap of what we have so far:

  • April 2022 - Humboldt Redwoods Workshop (physical)
  • May 2022 - Infrared Photography Workshop (online event)
  • August 2022 - Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop (online)
  • Sept. 2022 - Eastern Sierra Photo Workshop (physical)
  • Nov. 2022 - Oregon Coast Photography Workshop (physical)

You can learn more about all of these events and register by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

How to Pose Hands for Better Portraits

You can read the entire article on ThePhoblographer.com

I had no desire to be a portrait photographer when I started learning photography in college. The amount of work it takes to connect with people, pose them, and take a powerful image felt daunting. A few years later, I realized being an empathic human was an optimal job skill for portraits. Connecting with people came very easy once I leaned in and felt the energy in the room. The challenge was knowing how to direct them into a natural-looking pose once we developed a rapport. An even more significant obstacle was learning how to pose hands in a way that makes sense.

As it turns out, hands are a challenge for people on both sides of the camera. Everything can be going right in a portrait image. However, if the hands are stressed or don't make sense, that's the only thing viewers will see. An easy solution is to have the hands at the sides or hide them in pockets. This quick fix can also leave a lot on the table. Knowing how to work with hands in ways that make sense can elevate your portrait work.

More often than not, hands will be soft regardless of where they're positioned. Any stress in the hands will translate as tension. Below are a few tips that to make posing hands easier.

Then the author goes through the following poses and talks about hand positioning for each of them. Here are the poses:

  • Sitting in chair
  • On steps, stool, apple box
  • When standing
  • Utilize surroundings when standing
  • Have them doing something
  • Beauty photography

Very useful stuff!

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

I did get the gig at the Sonoma International Film Festival later this month, as I discussed in last week's podcast.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I pulled out some B&W prints today to help me answer the question, "Why do I like this type of photography so much?"

BW-Prints-1024.jpeg

Yes, color is beautiful, but sometimes color can be distracting as well. Plus, the appeal of monochrome goes beyond the mere absence of color. It's as though the hues are replaced with a wonderful metallic tonality. There's a visceral nature to these prints. I want to touch them.

B&W images are clarifying. The composition becomes cleaner, the lighting is sharper, they are easy to digest.

Even though most of my film shooting these days is with Tri-X and Ilford, I really like digital B&W with a mirrorless camera where I can choose the monochrome style I want to use and compose through the EVF with that very look. I feel like this makes my framing even stronger. Mirrorless cameras are truly a blessing for B&W enthusiasts.

My current favorite digital cameras for B&W work are the Olympus PEN-F in Mono 2 mode and the Fujifilm X100V in Acros+Y film simulation. I'm also experimenting with the Fujifilm GFX 100S with the Fuji GF 50mm pancake lens. The GFX supports my favorite B&W film simulations plus adjustable grain effect.

DSCF0077-GFX100S-Voigtlander-40mm-1024.jpg Redwood Stump - Fujifilm GFX 100S, Voigtlander 40mm f/2.0 lens, Monochrome+G mode. Photos by Derrick Story.

I capture in RAW+Jpeg using a monochrome style or film simulation. The Jpeg reflects that choice, while the RAW file retains all the color data. In post production, I can decide if I want to use the in-camera Jpeg, or process the RAW for even more dynamic range, then convert it in one of my favorite creative apps such as Silver Efex Pro or DXO Film Pack.

P3031366-Armstrong-Redwoods-1024.jpg Path in Redwood Forest - Olympus PEN-F, Lumix 12-35mm f/2.8 zoom, Monochrome 2 mode.

But there's more. I do recommend printing the picture on a really nice paper surface. The experience goes to a whole new level. Some of my favorites are: Red River Paper 60lb. Polar Matte, 75lb. Arctic Polar Luster, and Aurora Art White 300. You can review a great menu of B&W printing papers on the Red River Paper website.

After thinking about all of this, it finally dawned on me what I truly love about B&W photography: it allows me to see the world in a whole new way. How wonderful is that?

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #833, March 8, 2022. Today's theme is "Inside a Photo Assignment for Hire." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

On Saturday morning I climbed in to the ID.4 and plugged the address for the Fire Department Training Center into CarPlay. Fifteen minutes later I was redirected to an overflow parking lot that required a hike back to the event. Undeterred, I grabbed by camera bag, a cap, and shades an headed to the day's assignment. What happened before this moment, and what transpired afterward is the topic of today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 833

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Inside a Photo Assignment for Hire

IMGP2497-Women-Pub-Safety-Day-D-Story-1024.jpg

I know that some of you are curious about the photo assignments that I work for clients. It's an important part of my job because they keep me in touch with the demands of real world photography.

So I thought it would be fun to take you through the timeline of an assignment that I just completed.

Before I do that, however, I want to tell you a little bit about this event because I think it's very cool and important.

Women's Public Safety Day will provide young women ages 15 to 20 with a hands-on public safety learning experience. This immersive day will be led by local women from EMS, police, and fire departments sharing what it's like to be a woman in public safety, both on and off duty.

OK, now on to the timeline.

  • Friday, Feb. 11 - I received an email from the SRJC Communications and Marketing Coordinator stating, "Are you available to cover the Women's Public Safety Day on March 5th? I respond, "Yes, indeed!".
  • Friday, March 4 - I receive a follow up email with the scheduled events, onsite contact, and suggested shot list. I prepare my camera kit, charge batteries, and made sure everything was ready for the next morning.
  • Saturday March 5 - I depart for the event with an estimated arrival 15 minutes before my scheduled start. Good think, because the overflow parking set be back 15 minutes.
  • Now, in the podcast I describe the sequence of events that happened for the next 3 hours.

  • Sunday, March 6 - I began culling pictures during my first cup of coffee. At this point in the morning, only me and Sylvester the cat are awake. I captured 325 photographs. I whittled down the shoot to 100 images that I thought told the story well.
  • Monday, March 7 - I individually adjust each of the 100 shots, output them to full size resolution Jpegs, and upload them to the shared Dropbox with the client. I received word a few hours later that everything looked great, and a big Thank You!

One of the big differences that I noticed compared to the other photographers covering the event was that I use much short lenses and get closer to the action.

'Peek Performance' odds: Every Apple event rumor ranked

You can read the entire article on Macworld.com

Apple's first event of 2022 has certainly piqued our curiosity. While we usually have a pretty good idea about what's going to be released at this point--the only real surprise at the "Spring Loaded" event was Apple Card Family--Apple has done a good job keeping its "Peek Performance" event under wraps. So if you're playing along, here's what we're most likely to see on Tuesday.

  • iPhone SE (A15 chip; 5G connectivity): 100%
  • iPad Air (A15 chip; 5G connectivity): 95%
  • M1 Pro/M1 Max Mac mini (M1 Pro/M1 Max model to replace current Intel version): 75%
  • M2 Processor (the oldest M1 Macs are nearly 16 months old): 50%
  • MacBook Air (if M2 processor is announced): 45%
  • Standalone Display (27-inch, cheaper than current Pro display): 40%
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (with M2 chip): 30%
  • iPad Pro (with M2 chip): 30%
  • iMac Pro (27" version): 20%
  • Mac Pro: 15%

The 2022 TDS Workshop Season

We have great events lined up for this year, and there are a few more coming. Here's a recap of what we have so far:

  • April 2022 - Humboldt Redwoods Workshop (physical)
  • May 2022 - Infrared Photography Workshop (online event)
  • August 2022 - Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop (online)
  • Sept. 2022 - Eastern Sierra Photo Workshop (physical)
  • Nov. 2022 - Oregon Coast Photography Workshop (physical)

You can learn more about all of these events and register by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

The New OM-1: Impressed by the Specs? Here's my Hands-on Review of the Camera.

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

Author Ivor Rackham wrote:

I first trained in an engineering background. Consequently, I have always had a penchant for well-made precision instruments. When I lifted this camera from the box, my very first realization of the OM System OM-1 was how well it fits that bill; it looks and feels like a high-quality device, making it a pleasure to hold and use.

What He Liked

Firstly, I enjoy learning, and there is a lot to learn with the OM-1.

Next, there is a big leap forward in image quality; the increased dynamic range and operating speeds are noticeable in the real world, thanks to that new sensor and powerful processor that enable all the unique features mentioned above.

Third, I am glad that OMDS chose to listen to the Micro Four Thirds users and make improvements where they were needed, and not chase more megapixels, as dictated by the big brand marketing departments. I don't need bigger files.

Then there is the menu improvement. That will make it much more accessible for new users. It's color-coded and the sub-menu names are better. Although a different layout from its predecessors - I liked the previous version - it is still familiar enough to not seem completely alien. Furthermore, the four custom modes, and the customizable "My Menu" means that delving into the depths of the menu system is usually unnecessary. What is more, if something is grayed out, on the press of the Ok button, a dialog box can tell you why.

Fifth, I find the camera comfortable to use, and the buttons easy to reach, and its name is much less of a mouthful than its predecessors. It also feels really well made too. Plus that new EVF is crystal clear.

Sixth, the computational photography features are useful in the real world, and not gimmicks like fake bokeh. This is a serious photographer's camera.

What Could Be Improved

There is only one area of improvement that struck me: I wish the removable-battery charger had been included in the box. The USB-C charger and in-body charging is great, but I prefer to have my camera safely stored while I charge batteries. I also try to avoid long-term use of sockets and body covers to prevent wear. Plus, in some circumstances, I want to charge one battery while I am using the other. Consequently, the additional battery charger is on my shopping list. But that's a tiny gripe; I know photographers who are happy with in-body charging.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Yes, it's true: I have more than one camera. And I'm guessing that you do as well.

As fun as it is having multiple bodies, I've also learned a few tricks along the way to ensure that I enjoy a seamless workflow regardless of which capture device I'm using. None of these tips are rocket science, but it's amazing how often we overlook simple things in our hectic daily lives. So in that spirit, I offer these reminders for multiple-camera photographers (which I suspect is everyone).

Brooke-Bartleson-1024.jpg Pro photographer Brooke Bartleson with the new OM System OM-1, her latest Micro Four Thirds body that she is integrating into her workflow. Photo complements of OM System.

All in the Family

It's so tempting to add a new brand to your kit. I go through this all of the time, with my latest temptation being the new Nikons. But the reality is that if I stick with Micro Four Thirds for my interchangeable lens bodies, I have great economy regarding my lenses. That's why I waited for the new OM-1 instead of jumping to a different brand.

Being able to tap any optic in my existing library with a new camera body gets me up and running quickly and saves me from making redundant lens purchases (which really add up).

An exception to this approach was the the Fujifilm X100V. But it wasn't really since it's not an interchangeable lens camera, so it was a one-off purchase. And it helped my remain patient while the OM-1 was being developed.

Keep in mind that compatibility isn't limited to lenses. Batteries and accessories that work in multiple bodies are a dream!

Get Those Bodies In-Sync

When my pictures move from camera to computer, I want them to display in chronological order in my library. On any given shoot, I might have an OM-1 with a long lens and the E-M10 or PEN-F capturing the wider stuff.

By taking a few minutes to check each camera's internal clock before heading out the door, I can ensure that the timestamps match, and that the files land correctly in my photo management app.

One last thought on this: If a smartphone is part of your camera arsenal, then use it as your timestamp starting point.

Latest Firmware Please

Firmware updates handle a variety of tasks ranging from bug fixes to lens compatibility to adding new features. Keeping your camera and lens firmware current ensures that everything will work with everything, and that you'll have consistent features from each camera body within a brand.

Default Camera Settings

I recommend configuring a set of default settings for your camera, and having them as a starting point for each body.

In my case, it's Program Mode, Auto ISO, Auto White Balance, RAW+Jpeg, Standard Color Profile, and Single Shot drive. I chose these settings because if something happens quickly that I want to capture, I can grab the camera and fire knowing that I will get a shot. Having to fool around with adjustments often leads to missed opportunities. And if I have to switch cameras quickly, I want those same default settings for that body as well.

Once you get the first capture, then you can then adjust settings to fine tune the image. Just remember, once you're done with the shoot, return the camera to your default settings. Make that a habit.

Final Thoughts

I find it amazing how a little pre-planning leads to a wonderfully smooth workflow, even when multiple cameras are involved. I hope you found these reminders helpful.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #832, March 1, 2022. Today's theme is "My Favorite Tiny Lenses." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A compact sensor doesn't make much sense unless you have a few great pancake lenses to go with it. After all, that's where the nimbleosity comes in, with the glass! Today I'm going to share 5 of my favorite tiny lenses. These are the optics that lighten my load without compromising quality. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 832

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My Favorite Tiny Lenses

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Even though I ordered the new OM System Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO II Lens ($999) to go with the new OM-1, it will be used primarily for my professional work, inclement weather, and landscape. When I'm just banging around, I'll have the incredible Olympus Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ Lens ($299) on the camera most of the time.

You might think to yourself, "Why would you buy a flagship pro camera body and put a $299 optic on it?" Answer: because it's that good. And I'm not the only one that thinks that.

Digital Camera World just published an article titled, Olympus M.Zuiko 14‑42mm f/3.5‑5.6 EZ review - The best pancake zoom lens ever!. In their verdict they give it 5 Stars and say:

"The Olympus M.Zuiko 14‑42mm f/3.5‑5.6 EZ is, in our opinion, the best pancake lens ever. In full frame terms it covers a 28-82mm focal range in an impossibly small form factor - not only is this a genuine feat of engineering, but its optical performance punches way above its weight. This is the kind of lens that's only possible on Micro Four Thirds, making it an absolute travel and everyday essential for Olympus / OM System and Panasonic shooters."

I couldn't have said it better. And when I put that zoom on my PEN-F, OM-D E-M10, or even the new OM-1, I have a sophisticated camera with a wonderful 28-84mm zooming range that fits in my jacket pocket. Isn't that why we shoot Micro Four Thirds?

But Wait, There's More!

Here are four more favorite tiny lenses that I adore.

  • Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II ASPH. Lens ($267) - Characterized by its slender profile, the Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II ASPH. is a compact, slightly wide 40mm equivalent prime for Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras. Its bright f/1.7 maximum aperture offers notable control focus for working with shallow depth of field techniques and also benefits working in difficult lighting conditions. The optical design incorporates a pair of aspherical elements to suppress spherical aberrations and distortion for high sharpness and accurate rendering, and individual elements have also been multi-coated to control surface reflections and flare for improved contrast in strong lighting conditions.
  • Nikon Z 28mm f/2.8 (SE) Lens ($296) - The NIKKOR Z 28mm f/2.8 (SE) from Nikon is an ultra-compact and lightweight FX-format prime lens with a traditional Nikon heritage design. This Special Edition lens inherits its design from the classic NIKKOR lenses released around the same time as the Nikon FM2 film SLR camera, with features that faithfully reproduce the designs of that time, such as knurling, and a prominent control ring. With an f/2.8 max aperture, this fast, bright lens offers beautiful details at a standard focal length. Complementing the optical design, a multi-focus system, which employs two stepping motors, helps to realize impressively fast, accurate, and quiet focus performance, along with full-time manual focus override, to suit both stills and video needs. Additionally, a programmable control ring can be set for intuitive adjustment over a variety of camera and exposure settings. It makes for a great carry-around lens for spontaneous moments at any time of day.
  • Fujinon Super EBS23mm f/2 II Lens ($1,399, comes with the Fujifilm X100V camera) - An updated Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens features a revised optical design that now includes two aspherical elements for improved sharpness and clarity through the reduction of spherical aberrations and distortion. This lens's 23mm focal length is equivalent to 35mm, making it a comfortable wide-angle prime that is well-suited to a variety of shooting situations. The bright f/2 design also suits working in various lighting conditions and affords greater control over depth of field to help isolate focus on subjects. Additionally, a Super EBC coating has been applied to suppress lens flare and ghosting for greater contrast and color fidelity when working in strong lighting conditions.
  • Pentax DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens ($496) -- This lens is the reason I will never sell my Pentax KP DSLR - "The black HD Pentax DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens from Pentax is a prime portrait-length lens providing a 35mm-equivalent focal length of 105mm. This short-telephoto 23° angle of view is well-suited to portrait and landscape shooting as well as general long lens applications. A high-grade multi-layer HD coating has been applied to lens elements to help minimize flare and ghosting for enhanced contrast, clarity, and color fidelity and a nine-blade diaphragm contributes to an aesthetic out-of-focus quality to benefit shallow depth of field imagery. Additionally, an SP Protect coating has also been applied to the front lens element to effectively protect it from dirt, oil, and finger prints."

I have used every one of these lenses, and they shine both in image quality and compactness. What more could you want from an everyday optic?

Panasonic Plans to Continue to Support 'Full Micro Four Thirds Lineup'

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.com

During an online event called Creators Live with Lumix GH6, Panasonic indicated that it plans to continue to support a wide range of Micro Four Thirds cameras and not restrict its development just to high-end products. Spotted by DCLife and 43Rumors, the company's marketing manager Tomonori Nakanishi seems to commit to bringing new versions of cameras from across Panasonic's lineup.

"We believe in the diverse possibilities of Micro Four Thirds, and we are developing such diversified products," Nakanishi says, machine-translated by Google. "In today's world where full-size machines are becoming more popular in a sense, it may be a unique approach to develop the full-size lineup in-house and at the same time to develop the Micro Four Thirds lineup in full-scale. However, I believe that this approach will allow the 'GH6' to establish a very sharp and unique position in the world at this moment."

A Panasonic representative told PetaPixel that as popular as full-frame cameras are (and it has developed full-frame cameras as a response to that demand), there are certain things that the company can do with Micro Four Thirds that are not possible with larger sensors, at least not yet. These include specific metrics on pricing and performance that Panasonic's leadership thinks are important and have put at the forefront of its development cycle for many years.

While the photography community tends to belittle or downplay Micro Four Thirds, Panasonic regularly assures fans of the format that it has no plans to ever abandon the system.

The 2022 TDS Workshop Season

We have great events lined up for this year, and there are a few more coming. Here's a recap of what we have so far:

  • April 2022 - Humboldt Redwoods Workshop (physical)
  • May 2022 - Infrared Photography Workshop (online event)
  • August 2022 - Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop (online)
  • Sept. 2022 - Eastern Sierra Photo Workshop (physical)
  • Nov. 2022 - Oregon Coast Photography Workshop (physical)

You can learn more about all of these events and register by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Acknowledging Our Friends at Skylum, MacPaw, and the Sovereign Nation of Ukraine

Recently, Ivan Kutanin, Skylum CEO posted this on LinkedIN: "IMPORTANT NEWS! Friends, partners, and loyal Skylum friends, I need to inform you that Russian forces invaded Ukraine by land, air, and sea, confirming the worst fears we've had. As many of you know our development and core center is based in Kyiv, Ukraine, and at this strange time, we can not guarantee on-time support requesr answers and timing of updates to Luminar Neo.We strive for excellence in everything we do and make sure to further develop and improve Neo and we'll keep you updated on any news.

In these scary times what you can do is share this post to spread more word about what is happening in Ukraine right now, so that your local governments can impose sanctions on Russia and support Ukraine with defensive weapons.

You can also support the Ukrainian army by donating to the "Come back home alive" fund - https://lnkd.in/ebBxp_jt or to the National Bank of Ukraine fundraising account -https://lnkd.in/eciswuCx

Stay safe there and pray for Ukraine!

My friend, Julia Petryk then posted this: "Every morning I wake up in fear in a bomb shelter. Though I could hardly call that state a sleep. The first thing we do is checking how our relatives are doing in other parts of Ukraine. The whole country is on fire.

Russia invaded Ukraine bombing the territory of the sovereign state.

No tears left. No mercy for the enemy. We will win 🇺🇦✊♥️

My thoughts about our friends in Ukraine...

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #831, Feb. 22, 2022. Today's theme is "Lightroom vs CP1 with a Dash of Neo on the Side." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

For the longest time, Fujifilm photographers have heard that Capture One Pro is the best Raw processor for their files. But is that true? We review a head to head test with Lightroom to find out. Oh, and Luminar Neo is now available. How does it standup against Luminar 4 and AI. All of this and more on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Digital Photography Podcast 831

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

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Lightroom vs CP1 with a Dash of Neo on the Side

In the FStoppers article, Which Program Handles Fujifilm Raw Files Better, Lightroom or Capture One?, they pit the two premier RAW processors against one another with Fujifilm files. Some of their findings were quite interesting. Here are some excerpts from the article:

With Fujifilm medium format cameras, there is virtually no difference in how each of the film simulations are rendered. There is some back and forth between how Lightroom and Capture One work, however, for the most part, there's no clear winner.

On the other hand, it's quite a different story when it comes to Fujifilm APS-C cameras. Lightroom seems to have some problems with X-Trans sensors. Also, there are subtle differences in how the film profiles are rendered too.

Capture One has slightly more saturated red tones in the skin. This appears more pleasing in comparison to the Lightroom file, which leans more into the yellows tones. This is, of course, a matter of preference; however, the point is that for Fujifilm X-Trans cameras, there is a difference in how the film profiles are rendered.

The first thing to notice is that the Capture One image appears to have more contrast and vibrance. Due to these subtle differences, most people may likely prefer the results from Capture One. Also, Lightroom does do a better job at managing the vignette, but once again, some may prefer the darker corners.

Additionally, Lightroom seems to have a problem when it comes to rendering green tones from an X-Trans sensor. In the previous image, the blue and yellow tones were perfectly fine in how Lightroom rendered them; however, green seems to cause a lot of problems.

From the images that have been tested over the last month, it seems Lightroom mostly struggles with the color green. All of the other images tested did not demonstrate any issues. Effectively, this worming issue is going to be a problem if what you photograph contains a lot of green tones, for example, landscape photography.

If you're a landscape photographer, you will likely come across this issue in your images. If you're creating content for social media, then this may be a forgivable issue. If you're a professional photographer, it may be wise to avoid Lightroom and use Capture One instead.

Final Thoughts
In this series of articles, we covered Canon, Sony, and now Fujifilm. With Canon and Sony, the choice between Lightroom and Capture One was entirely down to personal preference. There was no clear way to determine a winner because both programs produced great results. With Fujifilm, there are objective differences that cannot be ignored.

If you shoot with medium format cameras such as the GFX 100S and the new GFX 50S II, then the differences are negligible. Capture One and Lightroom perform admirably with Fujifilm medium format cameras. This may also be the case with some Fujifilm APS-C cameras that use a Bayer sensor. However, with Fujifilm X-Trans cameras, it's clear that Capture One is the better choice.

Luminar Neo

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What is Luminar Neo? Have you ever wanted to achieve more with your images? Luminar Neo is an innovative image editor powered by AI technologies of the future that simplifies complex editing routines and enables creators to bring their boldest ideas to life. And enjoy it.

  • Get speed and flexibility in your editing with our brand-new core engine and layers workflow.
  • The new engine we built for Luminar Neo is based on all the best solutions from our combined and evolved experience for maximum performance and creativity and is developed for achieving complex creative results.
  • Adjust the light in your photo for creative control over the lighting in a scene. You can control the exposure of an image based on the distance from the lens to independently adjust the background and foreground exposure.
  • Automatically remove spots on your images caused by dust and dirt on your lens and sensor.
  • Clean up unwanted power lines from the skies in your cityscapes.
  • Experiment with infinite creative possibilities by effortlessly combining two or more images in a shot.

The new technologies and innovative user experience in Luminar Neo make creative image editing simple and fun.

How Do You Listen to the TDS Podcast?

Here are the Poll Results from our Inner Circle Members.

  • Apple AirPods
  • Car Audio Speakers
  • Using the Built-In Speakers on My Laptop or Mobile Device
  • Wired Earbuds
  • Over-the-Ear Headphones
  • Home Audio System

Some comments included:

"The car was always my favourite place for podcasts, but I don't commute now, so it's starting to move more to playing it in the house on HomePod. Occasionally, I will listen on a walk with AirPods but it has to be cold enough to wear a beanie or they won't stay in my ears!" - Andrew

"I almost always listen while driving. If I do listen at home, It is usually when doing yard work using over the ear heradphones. If I try to just listen, usually get so distracted with something that I never actually listen and have to go back and listen again." - Jeff

Transistor Radio was not an option... - John

The 2022 TDS Workshop Season

We have great events lined up for this year, and there are a few more coming. Here's a recap of what we have so far:

  • April 2022 - Humboldt Redwoods Workshop (physical)
  • May 2022 - Infrared Photography Workshop (online event)
  • August 2022 - Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop (online)
  • Sept. 2022 - Eastern Sierra Photo Workshop (physical)
  • Nov. 2022 - Oregon Coast Photography Workshop (physical)

You can learn more about all of these events and register by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Free Battery + 3-Year Extended Warranty with Purchase of OM-1!

You can read the entire article at on the Olympus Site.

To celebrate the introduction of our newest flagship camera, the OM SYSTEM OM-1, we're happy to provide you additional peace of mind through our special extended warranty offer. Simply complete your product registration and we'll give you a complementary 3-Year Extended Limited Warranty on the OM-1 body, which stretches your limited warranty coverage to four years from the date of your original camera purchase!

  • Preorder the OM SYSTEM OM-1 or OM SYSTEM OM-1 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm F2.8 PRO II kit from your favorite OM SYSTEM retailer.
  • Receive an additional OM SYSTEM BLX-1 Battery for free with your OM-1.
  • Register your OM-1 camera at GetOlympus.com/register within 45 days of purchase.
  • Receive an email confirmation of your Three Year Extended Limited Warranty. Hold on to that email confirmation; you'll need it along with the valid receipt from your camera purchase as proof of your extended warranty if you ever need assistance.

Offer valid from February 15, 2022 to March 3, 2022 for OM-1 preorders made in the US and Canada.

If you're going to order from B&H, please use this link.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

"I'd like a seat by the window."

That's a request that you'll hear from me over and over, whether we're in a restaurant, bar, or airplane. If it's a hotel, I want the street view. Visiting a friend at a high rise office, let's go over there.

Powell-St-SF-1024.jpeg Powell St., San Francisco. Photography with an iPhone 12 Pro Max. Photo by Derrick Story.

I consider windows a gift in photography. I don't worry about the glass because by now everyone knows how to avoid reflections by simply putting the camera up against it. And I don't notice any serious image degradation problems.

(Isn't it funny, some photographers are so worried about putting a multicoated optical filter in front of their lens, while others shoot freely through quarter-inch high-rise windows.)

For this lovely shot looking up Powell St. in San Francisco, I didn't have to risk a drone, rent a helicopter, or hang off an unstable precipice. I just had to go to lunch, request a window seat, and line up a few pictures while I sipped my coffee.

Windows to the world are a gift. Enjoy them!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #830, Feb. 15, 2022. Today's theme is "How the New OM SYSTEM OM-1 Mirrorless Camera Stacks Up." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As I predicted, OM-System has released a new flagship system camera titled the OM-1. This mirrorless will succeed the popular E-M1 Mark III and includes a raft of improvements. Plus, it starts shipping in early March. So let's dig in to how the latest Micro Four Thirds release stacks up to its predecessor. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 830

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

How the New OM SYSTEM OM-1 Mirrorless Camera Stacks Up

In this segment of the show, I will compare the new OM-1 to the E-M-1 Mark III. You can preorder the Olympus OM-1 for the $2,199 and it ships in early March. Preorders will receive an extra battery and 3 additional years of OM System warranty. Offer ends March 3, 2022.

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Western Digital to lose out on 6.5 exabytes of flash storage following production line contamination

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Western Digital has announced that two of its manufacturing facilities in Japan were contaminated, which has affected production and will result in a shortage of 'at least 6.5 exabytes in flash storage availability,' according to Reuters. For context, one exabyte is equivalent to one billion gigabytes.

Western Digital doesn't specify what products will be affected by this shortage, but its flash storage options include hardware under its SanDisk Professional (formerly G-Technology), SanDisk and WD brands.

Western Digital didn't specify how the contamination of its facilities happened, but says it will be working alongside Kioxia to get the facilities up and running as quickly as possible. As recent as last year, Western Digital and Kioxia were in talks to merge, according to Reuters, but nothing has come of the negotiations yet.

The 2022 TDS Workshop Season

We have great events lined up for this year, and there are a few more coming. Here's a recap of what we have so far:

  • April 2022 - Humboldt Redwoods Workshop (physical)
  • May 2022 - Infrared Photography Workshop (online event)
  • August 2022 - Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop (online)
  • Sept. 2022 - Eastern Sierra Photo Workshop (physical)
  • Nov. 2022 - Oregon Coast Photography Workshop (physical)

You can learn more about all of these events and register by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

These are the 10 most complained-about cameras amongst Twitter users

You can read the entire article at on DigitalCameraWorld.

Would you believe that the GoPro Hero8 Black is the most complained about camera on Twitter? That's according to Electronics Hub, which carried out its own research into negative tweets across a broad spectrum of electronic devices.

Here's the full top 10 with the percentage of negative tweets about these cameras.

1. GoPro Hero8 Black: 8.6%
2. GoPro Hero9 Black: 6.4%
3. Ricoh GR III: 5.7%
4. Polaroid Now: 5.5%
5. Nikon Z7 II: 5.1%
6. Sony A6600: 5.0%
7. Sony A7R IV: 5.0%
8. Canon EOS 90D: 3.8%
9. GoPro Hero10 Black: 3.8%
10. Sony A7 IV: 3.7%

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 51 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Beauty of Low Camera Angles

When I'm exploring the world with my camera, there are two shots I try to capture. First, the standard composition. You know, the one that initially caught my eye. Many times, that's the image I like.

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But then, I remind myself to compose a second version. This time with a low camera angle. And there are times when this is the image I love.

Low camera angles tend to increase drama with your foreground subject. My favorite versions have an object that I find visually interesting that I can work with, something to build the shot around. This can be particularly fun with a wide angle lens.

The background completely changes from this angle. In this shot, for example, I was able to include lots of morning sky and the moon. The standard framing had sand, ocean, and just a bit of sky - very different.

Cameras with flip-up LCDs make this task easier. That way I can get the framing as low as I want, compose the picture, and make adjustments without sacrificing my knees in the process.

Sometimes I use HDR to manage the wide tonal disparities. Other times I let the foreground subject go dark. It just depends on the mood I want.

Either way, remembering to add a few low angle compositions to the shoots has increased my keepers, and has often transformed ordinary subjects into something special.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.