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iPhone-Camera Couples

One of the projects that we're working on in our Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Workshop is experimenting with creatively capturing a scene with two nimble devices. The idea is, how can you leverage the best of a digital camera and a late model iPhone when traveling light in the field.

Here is an example of an iPhone-Camera Couple that I recorded yesterday at a rest stop on Interstate 5 in Northern California.

IMG_0157.jpeg iPhone 12 Pro Max image using the Ultrawide lens. Photos by Derrick Story.

C1P-EMIR0353-Interstate-5-K665-1024.jpg Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III dual spectrum camera with a Kolari Vision K665 filter.

Even though I'm traveling very light - just a mirrorless camera and an iPhone - I have many creative options... and no camera bag to lug around!

Our workshop participants are currently working on their own iPhone-Camera Couples. I'm really looking forward to what they come up with.

If you're interested in this sort of work, we have a Waiting List available for the next session of the Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Workshop. Put your name down, and I will contact you once we have a full boat.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #776, Feb. 2, 2021. Today's theme is "New Cameras for 2021" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Sony, Fujifilm, Leica, and Canon get 2021 off to a great start by launching a variety of cameras. From Sony's flagship full frame mirrorless to Canon's AI powered bot, there's bound to be something for everyone. I provide an overview of all this tantalizing gear in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

New Cameras for 2021

Fujifilm-New.jpg

OK, let's dig in and see what's waiting for us...

Leica M-10P Reporter - Inspired by Leica's history and connection with press and reportage photography, the M10-P "Reporter" is a special edition rangefinder camera featuring a streamlined body design along with a characteristic dark green paint finish. The camera also sports a highly durable scratch-resistant coating and is fitted with Kevlar trim for an even more rugged appearance and enhanced grip. This camera is part of a limited edition of 450 units.

  • 24MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
  • Leica Maestro II Image Processor
  • Optical 0.73x-Magnification Viewfinder
  • 3.0" 1.04m-Dot Touchscreen LCD
  • ISO 100-50000, up to 5-fps Shooting
  • Built-In Wi-Fi
  • Redesigned Shutter, Built-In Level Gauge
  • Stills-Only Operation
  • Dark Green Finish with Kevlar Trim

The Leica M-10P Reporter is available now for $8,795 (Body Only).

=================================

Sony Alpha 1 Mirrorless Digital Camera - Full-frame mirrorless offers high-resolution for stills shooting and impressive 8K video recording.

  • 50MP Full-Frame Exmor RS BSI CMOS Sensor
  • Up to 30 fps Shooting
  • ISO 50-102400
  • 8K 30p and 4K 120p Video in 10-Bit
  • 4.3K 16-Bit Raw Video Output
  • 9.44m-Dot EVF with 240 fps Refresh Rate
  • 759-Pt. Fast Hybrid AF, Real-time Eye AF
  • 5-Axis SteadyShot Image Stabilization
  • Dual Drive Mech. Shutter, 1/400 Sec Sync
  • 5 GHz MIMO Wi-Fi, 1000BASE-T Ethernet
  • Dual CFexpress Type A/SD Card Slots

You can pre-order the Sony Alpha 1 for $6,498 (Body Only). Shipping begins March 4, 2021.

=================================

FUJIFILM GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera - Pairs an ultra high-resolution 102MP sensor with an impressively compact and portable mirrorless camera body design.

  • 102MP 43.8 x 32.9mm BSI CMOS Sensor
  • X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • 4K30 Video; F-Log Gamma, 12-Bit Raw Out
  • 3.69m-Dot OLED EVF
  • 3.2" 2.36m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization
  • 425-Point Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • ISO 100-12800, Up to 5 fps Shooting
  • 400MP Pixel Shift Multi-Shot
  • 19 Film Simulation Modes

The FUJIFILM GFX 100S will begin shipping March 11, 2021 for $5,999 (Body Only).

=================================

FUJIFILM X-E4 Mirrorless Digital Camera with XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR Lens - Featuring the same 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 APS-C sensor and X-Processor 4 from the flagship model, the X-E4 offers rich color rendering, wide dynamic range, and an impressive sensitivity range for working in difficult lighting conditions.

  • 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans BSI CMOS 4 Sensor
  • X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • DCI/UHD 4K at 30 fps, Full HD at 240 fps
  • 2.36m-Dot 0.62x OLED EVF
  • 3.0" 1.62m-Dot 180° Tilting Touchscreen
  • 425-Point Hybrid AF System
  • ISO 160-12800, up to 30-fps Shooting
  • Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Connectivity
  • Film Simulation Modes
  • XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR Lens

The FUJIFILM X-E4 with XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR Lens will be available beginning March 11, 2021 for $1,049 including the lens. The body only will be $849. So you get that great lens for only $200.

=================================

Canon unveils AI-powered automatic camera, the PowerShot PICK - Full story on DP Review.

The experimental PowerShot PICK camera can analyze a scene, identify people, track their faces and then, using artificial intelligence, determine the ideal moment to capture a photo. In a rough translation, Canon refers to the PICK as an 'automatic shooting camera.' The PowerShot PICK combines Canon's optical, video processing, and artificial intelligence technology.

The PowerShot PICK uses a 1/2.3-inch 12MP CMOS image sensor. The sensor is paired with a 19-57mm equivalent zoom lens with a maximum aperture of F2.8. The PICK includes built-in image stabilization. The PICK pans 170° in both directions and can tilt 110°. The PICK records to a microSD card and weighs a mere 170g. As you can see in the video above, the PICK is small, with a height of about 3.5" (90mm) tall.

While the PICK is designed to take photos automatically in the background, which Canon believes will result in more authentic images and better mementos, the PowerShot PICK can also be manually controlled using keywords. A user says, 'Hello PICK,' followed by commands to take a photo, record video, change subjects and stop capturing.

The PICK will launch alongside a dedicated smartphone app, allowing you to view and share photos and videos captured by PICK. The app automatically recommends the best photos, although you can view all images.

The Canon PowerShot PICK is currently available only to backers on Makuake. The price for the PICK works out to just under $400. Given the campaign's success, the only remaining units are for the PICK and charging cable. The tripod bundle has sold out. Canon intends to ship the PICK to backers this July. Canon hasn't announced global or public release plans, so it's unclear if the PowerShot PICK will be available outside of Japan.

The Infrared Photography Workshop

If you want to learn the ins and outs of IR photography from the comfort of your home during this online event, then check out The Infrared Photography Workshop that begins in mid-March.

We'll start with an orientation meeting in early February to help you get your gear in order. That will give you time to get situation and familiar with your camera. We then begin instruction in mid-March.

You will learn how to:

  • Choose best IR filter to start with.
  • How to test your existing digital camera for infrared sensitivity.
  • Learn about the different types of IR conversions for digital cameras.
  • See how different IR filters produce wildly different results.
  • Learn how to fine-tune your images with software you already own.
  • Discover advanced techniques to take your images to the next level.

You can sign up now for $145. Inner Circle Members, visit out Patreon site for a discount coupon code.

ON1 Makes Good on Promise, Adds Plugin Support for Capture One

You can read the article here on PetaPixel.

ON1 has announced that its Effects, Portrait AI, Resize, and HDR plugins are now compatible with Capture One. The latest versions of these plugins were announced last year with the promise for Capture One support "soon." That promise has been fulfilled.

Originally launched for Adobe Lightroom Classic and Photoshop, Affinity Photo, Corel Paintshop Pro, and Apple Photos, ON1's addition of Capture One to that mix nicely fills out its support for the majority of photographers who want to use the company's plugins.

The ON1 Professional Plugins for Capture One are available individually for $69.99. Those who want all four plugins can get the ON1 Professional Plugin Bundle for $99.99. 14-day trials for each plugin are also available. A single purchase of any ON1 plugin includes both Windows and macOS versions, for use on two computers, and support for 11 languages.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Since I've been working more with the iPhone 12 Pro Max, I've found myself wanting to push the envelope for those lovely ProRAW files. One of my old friends, Raw Power for iOS not only taps ProRAW capability, it has some unique tools that you won't find in the standard Photos app. One of my favorites is the ability to add LUTs (lookup tables) to my pictures.

Raw-Power-LUT.jpeg Raw Power running on an iPad mini editing a ProRAW picture. Here I'm applying a Fujicolor Provia film simulation LUT.

Not only does the app come with a nice selection of built-in LUTs, such as a collection of Fuji film simulations, but you can add your own. For example, I've added a handful of Red/Blue swap LUTs so I can quickly edit my IR shots in Raw Power on the iPad. (Raw Power also includes a great Channel Mixer!)

If you're upping your iPhone photography game, especially with the new models, then why settle for the "out of the can" look? Work those files! And tapping LUTs is one fun and easy way to do so.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

After you've converted a camera for infrared photography, you need to think about how you're going to creatively work with the images you copy to your computer.

Picket Fence "Picket Fence" - Olympus E-M10 III converted by Kolari Vision with K590 nm IR filter. Processed in Photos plus editing extensions. Photo by Derrick Story.

The most common workflows rely on Photoshop to handle the basic duties of blue/red channel swap and basic processing of IR images. But you don't have to go this route. I've been using Photos for macOS with a handful of editing extensions: RAW Power, Pixelmator Pro, and Luminar 4. These extensions allow you to base your workflow in Photos, but still tap the functions of those powerful apps.

In this post, I'll show you one example of this approach using RAW Power.

RAW Power to the Rescue

Begin by downloading and launching RAW Power. (You can purchase this software at the Mac App Store for $29.99.) Then go to System Preferences > Extensions > Photos Editing and enable RAW Power. You're now set to go. You only have to do this step once. From now on, you can access RAW Power from within Photos.

Next, open your RAW IR image in Photos and go to Edit mode. (We're working with a color picture captured on a full-spectrum camera with a 590 nm IR filter.) Don't make any adjustments at this point with the native tools in Photos. We'll save those for finishing touches. Instead, go to the "three dots" at the top of the editing panel and choose RAW Power.

choose-RAW-Power.jpg The unedited RAW infrared image in Photos. Don't be tempted to make any adjustments yet with the sliders in Photos. Instead, go directly to your Editing Extension. In this case, RAW Power.

In RAW Power, start by making any basic exposure adjustments to get the image to a good starting point. Then, add the Channel Mixer to your Adjustments panel by selecting it from the Add Adjustments dropdown menu. Now you can perform the Red/Blue channel swap that is often desired with color IR images. Go to the Red channel and set Red to 0 and Blue to 100. Then go to the Blue channel and set Red to 100 and Blue to 0. You can play with the Constant slider to fine tune your conversion.

editing-in-RAW-power-1600.jpg Using the Channel Mixer and other adjustments in RAW Power to begin to shape the image.

You can use the other tools in this editing extension to further enhance the picture before returning to the Photos interface. Once you're at a stopping point, click on Save Changes to return to Photos.

Photos for Finishing Touches

fine-tune-in-Photos-1600.jpg You can continue to play with the picture in Photos, or you can send it to another editing extension such as Luminar.

Back in Photos, you can use its adjustment tools to further refine your image. And if you want, you can open it in another editing extension, such as Luminar, to take advantage of its effects.

The great thing about this workflow is that all your efforts are automatically backed up to iCloud and shared across all of your Apple devices. So you can show off your work on your iPhone, iPad, or another Mac. Or, of course, you can share to social media. And at no point in this workflow do you need Photoshop.

Final Thoughts

In terms of Editing Extensions, if you prefer Pixelmator Pro to RAW Power, it also has a Channel Mixer. So that's definitely a good option. Luminar 4 and newer no longer offer Channel Mixers, but Luminar is still good for finishing touches. And finally, RAW Power supports LUTs. There are a number of these profiles available that provide more automated conversions of infrared pictures. Just something to keep in mind as you explore your options.

The Infrared Photography Workshop - Online March 2021

Do you feel like the world is looking like "the same old same old" through your camera's viewfinder? Have you felt your enthusiasm for photography waning as the pandemic wears on? Then it's time for you to consider exploring infrared imaging. This online event will reenergize your creativity and show you how to produce images that are unique and bursting with life.

You can learn more and sign up by visiting The Infrared Photography Workshop Page. Hope to see you there!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #775, Jan. 26, 2021. Today's theme is "What to Do with Your Old Digital Camera?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As time marches on and we acquire new gear, there remains the question of what to do with our aging cameras. Unless it's a relatively new model, chances are good that it isn't worth much on the used market. So then what? I present some ideas on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

What to Do with Your Old Digital Camera?

Pentax-1024.jpeg

I try to limit the amount of excess stuff in my home and at work. This takes a surprising amount of vigilance. I've learned that if I slack off just for a year or so, I'll notice things piling up in my closet and on the shelves.

Most of these items can be recycled, some can be donated, but I've noticed that digital cameras occupy an unique niche in this challenge that isn't easily managed.

First of all, they still work. Just because a camera doesn't have the latest specs doesn't mean it isn't useable. Second, they usually represent a sizable investment. And finally, I often have an emotional attachment because of the places I've been and the things I've done with a camera.

As a result, I've worked up some ideas that make this challenge palatable. And I thought that I would share them with you.

5 Ideas for Used Digital Cameras

  • Convert it to an Infrared camera - This is a great way to keep an old friend by your side. As I discussed last week, IR photography is invigorating. And you may just fall in love all over again. I recommend Kolari Vision for this service.
  • Swap it for other gear that you need - I've done this more than I would have imagined possible. If I have a camera that I want to upgrade to a newer model, I've been lucky enough to trade it for some other gear that I needed.
  • Donate it to education For many students, equipment costs is a barrier to them taking a photography class. And many high schools and junior colleges accept donations to help mitigate this problem.
  • Find a specialty use for it - I did not want to part with my Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, even though I wasn't using it in the field any longer. I now keep it in the studio for my product photography for TheFilmCameraShop and for my blog posts on TDS. Web publishing doesn't require lots of pixels, and my older cameras work perfectly in this scenario.
  • Use it in high risk situations - Whether it's a river raft trip or as a loaner to someone learning photography, it's far better to meet an ill fate with a camera that you're no longer depending on.

The bottom line is, nobody likes to be put out to pasture, not even digital mechanical devices that can still have purpose in life. Pull that camera off the shelve and see what you can do with it.

The Infrared Photography Workshop

If you want to learn the ins and outs of IR photography from the comfort of your home during this online event, then check out The Infrared Photography Workshop that begins in mid-March.

We'll start with an orientation meeting in early February to help you get your gear in order. That will give you time to get situation and familiar with your camera. We then begin instruction in mid-March.

You will learn how to:

  • Choose best IR filter to start with.
  • How to test your existing digital camera for infrared sensitivity.
  • Learn about the different types of IR conversions for digital cameras.
  • See how different IR filters produce wildly different results.
  • Learn how to fine-tune your images with software you already own.
  • Discover advanced techniques to take your images to the next level.

You can sign up now for $145. Inner Circle Members, visit out Patreon site for a discount coupon code.

Turning Off Your Camera on a Zoom Call Helps Save the Planet

You can read the article here on PetaPixel.

If you often find yourself in Zoom meetings in which others on the call don't need to see your face, you now have a great excuse for leaving your camera off: it can help save the environment.

A new study conducted by researchers at Purdue, Yale, and MIT has found that one hour of videoconferencing emits up to 1 kilogram of carbon dioxide, uses up to 12 liters (3.2 gallons) of water, and requires a piece of land the size of an iPad Mini.

In their new paper titled "The overlooked environmental footprint of increasing Internet use" and published in the journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling, the scientists noted that leaving your camera off during that hour-long call could reduce that footprint by a whopping 96 percent.

Turning off a camera for 15 hour-long meetings every week would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 9.4 kilograms (20.7 pounds) per month. If one million Zoom users did this, they would save 9,000 tons of CO2, the equivalent of coal-powered energy used by a city of 36,000 in that same month.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Video conference calls have replaced many of our in-person meetings. This course is designed to help you improve your appearance and audio online to interact as effectively as possible.

improved-videoconferencing.jpg Watch: Use your digital camera to improve video conferencing from Improved Video Conferencing with Digital Cameras by Derrick Story

In this course, available on both lynda.com and on LinkedIn Learning, I will show you features to look for in selecting the right camera and lens, then explain how to adjust the aperture setting, lighting, and color to look your best.

Audio is just as important as video for conference calls. I'll step you through how to select the right mic for your needs and show how earbuds with mics and AirPods can be reasonable alternatives to USB mics. Also, it's important to create a background that isn't distracting and will help others focus on you and what you are saying.

The online training is organized by bite-sized movies that explain an individual topic. So you can watch them in sequence, or jump to the areas that you're most interested in. And in just a short time, you will be looking and sounding great online!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #774, Jan. 19, 2021. Today's theme is "Why Now Is the Time for Infrared Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

After 10 months of enduring the pandemic, most of us know every square inch of our immediate environment. We've photographed the same scenes dozens of times, or have given up shooting all together. I have an amazingly effective vaccine for this creative malaise: infrared photography. And I will explain why in today's TDS podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Why Now Is the Time for Infrared Photography

I have one of three walks that I take daily. And every time I head out the door, I have a camera with me hoping to capture something new and unique.

These walks are important to me because my jobs as a photographer have all been crushed by the virus. And I haven't traveled for work since March 2020. So each day I hope to see something new to record and possibly share with others. And lately, each day I've been disappointed.

One of my friends, Harold, is a big fan of infrared photography. He's shown me a lot of different things that you can do with it that go beyond what I've dabbled with over the years. So I decided to revisit what's happening now in IR. And it blew my mind!

Infrared-Camera-1024.jpeg

The big leap I took was getting my hands on an Olympus E-M10 Mark III that had been converted to full spectrum by Kolari Vision. This allowed me to use a variety of IR filters to create radically different looks.

Now, when I take those daily walks over familiar territory, it's like I'm in a different world each day. On Monday I can shoot with the 720nm for stunning IR black and white, then on Tuesday, take the same walk with an IR Chrome filter to create a delicious world of complementary oranges and blues. Every day is a new day thanks to IR photography.

You can start small to ease into IR or go big with a converted camera. Either way, you will open up a world that was literally not visible to you before. And suddenly, hometown photography is fun again.

Here are 5 Fun Tips about IR photography

  • Test an existing camera for IR sensitivity - Point a TV remote controller at your camera lens in live view. Press a button. If a dot of light is recognized on the LCD, then your camera has some IR sensitivity.
  • Start with a Hoya R-72 Infrared Filter - I think this is the easiest way to begin with a camera that is not converted. You will have slowish shutter speeds, but I have made some wonderful pictures with this filter.
  • Invest in a converted camera You can invest in a Kolari Vision pocket camera for as little as $249 including filters, or you can have an existing camera converted.
  • More Options with Broader Spectrum Cameras - One of the things that got me really excited about IR the second time around was working with a full spectrum camera that gives me access to a wide variety of looks.
  • A Hot Mirror Filter Gives Your Traditional Pictures from a Broad Spectrum Camera - If you want to use your IR camera for regular pictures as well, then get a broad spectrum conversion with a hot mirror filter to go over the lens.

IR photography will give your creativity the jumpstart it needs while we navigate the ongoing pandemic in 2021. Have fun with it!

The Infrared Photography Workshop

If you want to learn the ins and outs of IR photography from the comfort of your home during this online event, then check out The Infrared Photography Workshop that begins in mid-March.

We'll start with an orientation meeting in early February to help you get your gear in order. That will give you time to get situation and familiar with your camera. We then begin instruction in mid-March.

You will learn how to:

  • Choose best IR filter to start with.
  • How to test your existing digital camera for infrared sensitivity.
  • Learn about the different types of IR conversions for digital cameras.
  • See how different IR filters produce wildly different results.
  • Learn how to fine-tune your images with software you already own.
  • Discover advanced techniques to take your images to the next level.

You can sign up now for $145. Inner Circle Members, visit out Patreon site for a discount coupon code.

The Death of the Entry-Level DSLR Is Upon Us: Nikon Calls Time on the D3500 and D5600

You can read the article here on Fstoppers.

Last week, Nikon confirmed that its two most affordable DSLRs, the D5600 and D3500 are now "archived products." Are we witnessing the slow disappearance of the entry-level DSLR?

TechRadar reached out to Nikon following reports that the two cameras have been listed as "archived." This, according to Nikon Rumors, is usually an indication that the two models are about to be discontinued if they haven't been already. "In Japan, the D5600 and D3500 are archived products," Nikon explained. "The products will continue to be sold in countries and regions other than Japan. We plan to continue selling these products for the time being. For areas other than Japan, we will consider the optimal timing for discontinuation based on the needs of the market and customers."

Nikon continues to occupy a curious position in terms of its DSLR cameras, having just released new versions of the Z 6 and Z 7 mirrorless cameras but, according to rumors, intends to produce not one but potentially two new high-end DSLR cameras in the near future. One near-certainty will be the successor to the popular D850 and it remains unclear what the second might be.

Virtual Camera Club News

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

After months of pandemic isolation, I am way too familiar with every inch of real estate within a 5-mile radius of my house. And to be honest, it feels like I've taken every picture there is to take. That is, until I rediscovered infrared photography.

EMIR0074-R72-D-Story-1024.jpeg I've walked this path a 1000 times. But today I'm excited to be shooting here. Photo by Derrick Story with a 720 nm filter.

Now, when I take my walks with an Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III converted by Kolari Vision, my world looks brand new. And I'm excited to be taking pictures again.

"Infrared photography is a look into the invisible world. The human eye can see wavelengths from about 400nm-700nm (from purple to red); infrared is the light beyond 700nm. IR photography can be done with either infrared film, or a digital camera, and typically involves near infrared light in the 700nm to 1200nm range."

You can read an excellent introduction to IR on the Kolari Vision site. My experience is that you can "start simple" with a camera that you already have and a Hoya R-72 Infrared Filter. This is how I began, using a Fujifilm X20 digital camera that is relatively sensitive to IR light.

X20 Infrared 1 Fujifilm X20 camera with a Hoya R72 filter.

(You can test any digital camera by pointing an TV remote control at the lens in live view and seeing if a white dot appears on the LCD screen when you press any remote button.)

The advantages of the Hoya R-72 plus existing camera is the small investment. Depending on the diameter, you can usually buy the filter for around $50. The disadvantage is the filter is dense resulting on long shutter speeds for non-converted cameras. The good news is, if you move on to a full-spectrum converted camera, your R72 filter is even more useful on it.

If you catch the IR bug, and it is highly contagious, then chances are good that you will begin to explore the different types of camera conversions. You can go for a specific wavelength, such as a 720nm conversion, or get a full-spectrum conversion that makes all wavelengths available. You then simply add the appropriate filter to get the look you want.

FullSize-EMIR0025-IRchrome.jpeg The Kolari Vision IR Chrome lens filter on a full-spectrum Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III.

One of my favorites is the Kolari Vision IR Chrome lens filter that produces the look of Kodak Aerochrome IR film. I think the look is beautiful with its complementary color scheme. And I can use auto white balance and just shoot normally. But the results are anything but typical.

If you're looking for a creative way to survive the challenges of 2021, then I would seriously consider dabbling in infrared photography. I'm once again excited to take my morning walks, exploring what was once familiar territory that now looks like an entirely new world.

The Infrared Photography Workshop - Online March 2021

Do you feel like the world is looking like "the same old same old" through your camera's viewfinder? Have you felt your enthusiasm for photography waning as the pandemic wears on? Then it's time for you to consider exploring infrared imaging. This online event will reenergize your creativity and show you how to produce images that are unique and bursting with life.

You can learn more and sign up by visiting The Infrared Photography Workshop Page. Hope to see you there!

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #773, Jan. 12, 2021. Today's theme is "Kingston's Workflow Station a Dream for Photographers." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

My annual pilgrimage to Las Vegas for the CES show was shortened to a stroll across the room where I watched the product unveilings on my computer. Fortunately some vendors had the foresight to send us samples ahead of the show, and my hands-down favorite so far is the Kingston Workflow Station they just announced. I'm now going to introduce it to you as well. I hope you enjoy the show.

Kingston's Workflow Station a Dream for Photographers

Kingston's Workflow Station and Readers give users the freedom to create and customize a file offload setup that fits their needs allowing them to transfer video, photos, and audio from multiple sources at once.

P1114857-Videoconference-Workstation.jpg

Whether on a 4K/8K multi-cam shoot with portable audio recorders or filming B-Roll with drones and GoPros, with the customizable Workflow Station Dock you can simultaneously connect the USB miniHub, SD or microSD readers that the shoot requires to transfer footage quickly. Workflow Readers can also be used standalone by connecting to a laptop via the included USB-C cable giving users the flexibility to have their workflow on-the-go.

Some of the highlights of this new device include:

  • Offload Files Quicker - Transfer video, photos, and audio from multiple sources at once.
  • Flexible Workflow System - Use only the hub and readers that fit your setup.
  • Portable Versatility Use the card readers on-the-go via their included USB-C.
  • Incredible Performance - Workflow Station products support USB 3.2 speeds which get you to editing quicker.

You'll need at least Windows 8 or macOS 10.10 for compatibility. I tested the dock with macOS Catalina, and it worked fantastic.

P1114858-Videoconference-Workstation.jpg

You can order the Kingston Workflow Station now for $135 that includes the Dock, a USB miniHub, power adapter, and cords. The SD Card Reader miniHub supports 2 UHS-II SD cards and can be used by itself or in the Dock, and is available for $36. Same price for the Micro SD card reader miniHub that also supports 2 UHS-II microSD cards.

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Exposure X6 software review: Faster than ever and even more capable

You can read the article here on DP Review.

Back in 2020, I reviewed Exposure Software's Exposure X5 and discovered much to love. A rival to the likes of Lightroom and Capture One, I found Exposure X5 to be blazingly fast and quite capable.

With a pretty affordable price tag and no subscription fees, it made for a very credible alternative to its more established rivals, especially for photographers on a budget. Now the follow-up, Exposure X6, is here, and I've tested all of its new features to see how they stack up.

  • Offers an equivalent to most of Lightroom's core features with no subscription and an affordable price tag.
  • Even better performance than its already-swift predecessor.
  • Loads of controls and a ton of quick-and-easy presets.
  • More auto controls get you in the ballpark quickly.
  • Noise reduction is now tuned to your camera model.
  • Less broad Raw support than its Adobe rival.

Available immediately, Exposure X6 can be purchased from Exposure Software for $129, which is an increase of $10 over the previous version. A free 30-day trial version can be obtained here. Those who purchased Exposure X5 after July 15, 2020 can upgrade for free, while earlier customers can upgrade for $89. A bundle including Exposure Software's Blow Up and Snap Art tools is priced at $149

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

More CES 2021 Coverage

The show is just getting started today, but by the end of this week we will know all of the photography-related announcements. I share my favorites on next week's podcast.

One that did leak out today was the Sony Airpeak Drone that can carry an Alpha camera. That sounds pretty fun!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There's been a vigorous discussion about the notion of substituting a modern iPhone (or other brand equivalent) for your bulging backpack, but not your favorite digital camera.

1600px-DSC_1821-tandem.jpg

I think this idea appeals to photographers for a few reasons.

  • We love digital cameras and want to use them.
  • Serious photographers rail at the idea of a smartphone world only.
  • Many of us want to travel as light as possible.
  • Smartphones make a great second camera.
  • Ultrawide smartphone lenses can substitute for optics in our bags.

I posted an article on Medium.com titled, Replace the Bag, not the Camera that outlines the details of this approach.

You may also want to listen to the podcast, Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It.

And finally, if you're interested in attending an online workshop that provides an hands-on experience with this concept, you can join a Wait List for "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photo Workflow".

This is nimble photography at its best!

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