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This is The Digital Story Podcast #936, Feb. 27, 2024. Today's theme is "Is Something Really Wrong, or Is It Me?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Even people who use electronics all the time can be baffled by them. You turn it on, get a warning light, and wonder, "Is something really wrong, or is it me?" It could go either way. And it's hard not to jump to conclusions. I've had a rash of these experiences lately. And I'll share a couple of them with you, if for no other reason, to demonstrate that we all fall into this trap. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 936

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Is Something Really Wrong, or Is It Me?

I do admit, I push the envelope sometimes, especially if I can save a few dollars. In my mind, I am the king of repurposing. And for the most part, this works well for me.

But every now and then I trip on my own shoelaces. My latest folly, which I have to admit makes me laugh at myself, is a story about the Nikon Zf, which comes with one battery and no charger.

We all know that a happening photographer can not survive on one battery alone. And to buy a second would tack on $60 to the budget. So I examined an extra battery I already owned, the Nikon EN-EL15 that came with my aging D610 DSLR. It looked just like the EN-EL15c that came with the Zf with just a little less horsepower.

And sure enough, when I inserted the EL15 into the Zf, everything worked normally. Problem solved! I checked this substitution online and Nikon officially states that the EL15 was not supported in the Zf. But it was working great.

And to make things even better, the Nikon Battery Charger MH-25 that was also included with the D610 charged both the old and the new Nikon batteries. I was in frugal heaven.

Life has been good since this discovery. I have two batteries for the Zf, and that's all I need for my everyday photography. I keep the newer one in the camera and pack the older one as a backup.

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Then on a Saturday Theresa and I had some errands out in wine country. The rain had subsided, and the forecast was fantastic. "I'm bringing the Nikon," I said to myself.

I didn't have the battery charger at home. It was at the studio. "No problem," I thought. I can charge the Zf via a USB-C cable. So I dug around in my bag, found a nice substantial one, and connected the camera to a power source.

The charging light started blinking, continued for 30 seconds, then went dark. "Hmmm," I thought. "Seems like it should stay on while charging." I checked the LCD screen and noticed that it was not charging.

"That's odd," I thought. I'll try again. Same thing happened. 30 seconds of blinking then nothing.

My next thought was shrouded in darkness. "Oh no! I have a defective camera." I took a deep breath. "Now hold on there cowboy. It's probably something simple. Maybe it's the cord or the power brick."

So, I found another cord and another brick. Same result. I tried yet another tandem. No charge. At this point I had the contents of my equipment bag spread all over the couch, and a battery that was only 40 percent charged.

When all else fails, read the owners manual. I found the PDF on my iPad and looked up charging. There was a note that stated when the light blinks for 30 seconds and goes out, it's a charging error. Excellent. I have the only Nikon Zf in California that won't charge via USB.

I felt defeated. I repacked the contents of my cord pouch and stuffed it back in the backpack. "Might as well tidy up," I thought. Then I poured myself another cup of coffee and pondered my situation.

"Why won't it work? Is it really broken?"

Then I thought of one last-ditch effort. What if I switched batteries and tried charging the backup? Who know, right?

I fetched the backup battery out of my backpack and switched it out with the one in the camera. Plugged everything ink, and waited. The charge light went on, and it was steady. I checked the LCD screen and it too indicated that the camera was charging. I was partially relieved.

I examined the battery that I had extracted from the camera; the one that one not charge. It looked fine. Then I noticed on the back of the battery that I was trying to charge the older EL-15, not the battery that came with the camera. I must have forgotten that I switched them.

Then my charging light went on. The Nikon was charging because it had the battery in it that came with the camera, not the 5-year-old cell that wasn't supported.

I guess that charging via USB involves more than just the camera, but the battery too. Nothing was wrong with my equipment. It was me.

Photomator 3.3 Adds a Powerful New File Browser to the Photo Editor

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com.

Pixelmator has released a significant update to Photomator, its award-winning photo editing app for Mac, iPhone, iPad, and Vision Pro. Photomator 3.3 includes a powerful new file browser built on native macOS functionality, promising a fast and convenient photo browsing and editing experience, no matter where photographers keep their files.

"One of the things that users love most about Photomator is how right at home it feels on Mac," says Simonas Bastys, lead developer at the Pixelmator Team. "And with the addition of the powerful file browser, it's now simpler than ever to browse and edit photos not just on Mac but also across external drives and cloud services."

Pixelmator says users can import "tens of thousands of photos in seconds" by dragging and dropping them into the new Photomator file browser. Edits are directly synced with the original photos without creating duplicate files or catalogs, helping photographers keep their large image libraries organized and clutter-free.

"Users can seamlessly edit photos stored across various cloud services such as Dropbox, Box, Google Drive, and Microsoft OneDrive, as well as SSDs, NAS devices, or SD cards, with the same ease as editing on their Mac. Regardless of the storage location, photo editing is completely nondestructive, letting users preserve the original photo and revert edits at any time," promises Pixelmator.

Photomator is available to download for free from the Apple App Store. Within the free version, users can access all of the app's editing tools and save a limited number of edited images. For unlimited access, users must pay $5 per month, $30 a year, or $120 for a lifetime license. Photomator is compatible with devices running iOS and iPadOS 16 or later for iPhone and iPad and macOS 13 or later for Mac.

The photo editing app was also named the Mac App of the Year last November by Apple.

My Testing Observations

Does work well and is fast. When it comes to RAW files, however, Photomator uses the Apple profiles. So if your Mac doesn't support a camera, such as my Nikon Zf, then neither will Photomator.

Infrared Photography Workshop - Online - June 2024

Do you feel like the world is looking like "the same old same old" through your camera's viewfinder? Have you felt your enthusiasm for photography waning? Then it's time for you to consider exploring infrared imaging.

Suddenly walks you've taken a hundred times look completely different as you see them through your camera. Old familiar subjects burst to life with new vibrancy. IR photography can energize your creativity, not only for this medium, but for all of your artistry.

Beginning June 5, 2024, join us for this 4-week exploration into the world of IR. During this event, you will learn:

  • The best IR filter to start with.
  • How to test your existing digital camera for infrared sensitivity.
  • Learn about the different types of IR conversions for digital cameras.
  • See how different IR filters produce wildly different results.
  • Learn how to fine-tune your images with software you already own.
  • Discover advanced techniques to take your images to the next level.
  • And much, much more.

This online workshop (Zoom) begins on Wednesday, June 5, 2024, with both morning (9am PST) and evening sessions (4pm PST) available. We will convene weekly thereafter via Zoom for more training sessions (AM and PM), Q&A, and to compare notes. You can attend morning, evening, or both sessions. It's essentially the same content, just different participants.

It is so much fun.

Plus, you will have unlimited access to our online workshop community, DerrickStoryOnline. Here, you can mingle with other workshop participants (past and present), share images for comment, exchange tips and techniques, and enjoy the fellowship of other creatives who share your passion for image-making.

You can reserve your spot for the Infrared Online Workshop here.

Announcement: The Original OM-1 Has a Major Performance Firmware Upgrade [Coming]

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

OM Digital Solutions has been working on a firmware upgrade for their original OM-1. They announced the OM SYSTEM OM-1 Mark II interchangeable lens camera on January 30, and there have been many inquiries regarding the possibility of a firmware update to the OM SYSTEM OM-1 that was released nearly two years ago.

Not every feature of the new OM-1 Mark II will be included in the older camera with this firmware upgrade, no doubt because the Mark II version included new hardware to cope with the additional functionality. However, they are living up to their promise of updating the OM-1.

The future firmware upgrade is scheduled to be available later this year, most likely in October.

The improvements that will be brought about by the update will be:

Autofocus: Improvement of some AF performance capabilities, such as S-AF and C-AF in all-target mode to improve capture of main subjects Operability: Improved usability through the option to assign the trash (delete) button as a menu access shortcut.

OMDS says it cannot include new features introduced with the OM-1 Mark II, such as Live GND - the in-built graduated filter - and AI Detection AF for humans.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

X100VI-Overview.jpg

This is The Digital Story Podcast #935, Feb. 20, 2024. Today's theme is "How Do I Pick My Best Shot? (And the New Fujifilm X100VI)" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Breaking news! The Fujifilm X100VI. And... photographers tend to be too hard on themselves, or way too generous when evaluating their pictures. But there's a middle ground. To reach it, we need to honestly answer a few basic questions during the review process. In the first segment of today's TDS Photography Podcast, I'll let you know what those are, and how they can help you make better choices when selecting your images. Then we take you to Tokyo for the Fujifilm X-Summit. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 935

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How Do I Pick My Best Shot?

Have you ever opened up your laptop to show off a favorite picture, one that you worked very hard on, only to have the viewer rave about a different shot that you had passed by?

"But I worked hours on this one to get it perfect!" you counter. "Oh, that one is nice too," the viewer says in a comforting voice.

Photographers have many blind spots when evaluating their own work. One of the most common is, "If I spend lots of time working on a picture, it's better than the others." That may or may not be the case.

But how do you know? You can move the odds more in your favor by analyzing your favorite photos using this process. It goes something like this. Let's apply this technique to a photo shoot you've just completed.

  • First, you have to separate the good shots from the bad ones. This is easy to do. Say that you have 100 images from the shoot, odds are solid that at least 25 of them will be good. That means they could stand on their own with very little image editing.
  • Second, put the good photos in their own album so you are only looking at those.
  • Third, go through those 25 again and pick the 5-10 pictures that you like best. So far, we haven't really done anything new. But we will with the next step.
  • Fourth, isolate those 5-10 favorites, enlarge the first one to full screen, and ask yourself the following 3 questions.

Is the content of this photograph compelling? What I mean by that is, is there a clear center of interest and does it tell a story?

Is the image technically sound? That is, is the exposure good and the sharpeness appropriate for the subject?

Is there emotional appeal? Do you feel something when you look at the picture?

Your best images will answer yes to all three questions.

One of the things I've observed during lab sessions at our TDS workshops is that many photographers give too much weight to technical considerations and not enough to content and emotion. The irony is, if we had to live without one of the three, it would be the technical.

Photos that have interesting content with emotional appeal will always outshine technically perfect images with general audiences. Once a person identifies your main subject and is attracted to it, the game is over.

Pixel peepers may criticize image noise or a plugged-up shadow area, but if they are ignoring a great subject in the process, then they're missing the point.

Try this four-step process on a recent photo shoot, and see if you're surprised by the winners. Maybe next time you open up your laptop to show off a picture, it will also be the favorite for the person you're showing it too.

If you want more on this subject, check out my Live View article, How to Better Evaluate Our Pictures. This is a free link!

Fujifilm X100VI Announced at X-Summit Tokyo

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Fujifilm photographers have their first X-Summit of the year on Feb. 20th in Japan. And they didn't have to wait long for the announcement of the new X100VI Digital Camera.

The estimated ship date is Feb. 28, but you can preorder the X100VI now for $1,599.

On today's podcast, you can hear directly from Fujifilm about their new compact camera.

Infrared Photography Workshop - Online - June 2024

Do you feel like the world is looking like "the same old same old" through your camera's viewfinder? Have you felt your enthusiasm for photography waning? Then it's time for you to consider exploring infrared imaging.

Suddenly walks you've taken a hundred times look completely different as you see them through your camera. Old familiar subjects burst to life with new vibrancy. IR photography can energize your creativity, not only for this medium, but for all of your artistry.

Beginning June 5, 2024, join us for this 4-week exploration into the world of IR. During this event, you will learn:

  • The best IR filter to start with.
  • How to test your existing digital camera for infrared sensitivity.
  • Learn about the different types of IR conversions for digital cameras.
  • See how different IR filters produce wildly different results.
  • Learn how to fine-tune your images with software you already own.
  • Discover advanced techniques to take your images to the next level.
  • And much, much more.

This online workshop (Zoom) begins on Wednesday, June 5, 2024, with both morning (9am PST) and evening sessions (4pm PST) available. We will convene weekly thereafter via Zoom for more training sessions (AM and PM), Q&A, and to compare notes. You can attend morning, evening, or both sessions. It's essentially the same content, just different participants.

It is so much fun.

Plus, you will have unlimited access to our online workshop community, DerrickStoryOnline. Here, you can mingle with other workshop participants (past and present), share images for comment, exchange tips and techniques, and enjoy the fellowship of other creatives who share your passion for image-making.

You can reserve your spot for the Infrared Online Workshop here.

Apple warns: Drying a wet iPhone in rice could actually make things worse

You can read the entire article on Macworld.com

For years, we've turned to a simple household staple when we need to save our iPhones from a liquid death: a bag of rice. The method is decidedly low-tech. Just pop your phone in a bag of rice, seal it up, and wait for a day or so. The idea is that the rice will draw the water out from inside the phone before it can fry any internal parts. People who have experienced waterlogged phones swear by it, and there's tons of anecdotal evidence to show that it does indeed work.

However, researchers have been claiming for years that it's all a myth and rice doesn't actually dry your phone faster and could slow down the process, leaving your logic board susceptible to further damage. And a new 2024 support document from Apple actually advises against using rice to dry out your iPhone since it could make matters worse, as "doing so could allow small particles of rice to damage your iPhone." Instead, Apple suggests the following steps:

Tap your iPhone gently against your hand with the connector facing down to remove excess liquid. Leave your iPhone in a dry area with some airflow. After at least 30 minutes, try charging with a Lightning or USB-C cable or connecting an accessory.

If you see the alert again, there is still liquid in the connector or under the pins of your cable. Leave your iPhone in a dry area with some airflow for up to a day. You can try again to charge or connect an accessory throughout this period. It might take up to 24 hours to fully dry.

If your phone has dried out but still isn't charging, unplug the cable from the adapter and unplug the adapter from the wall (if possible) and then connect them again.

Among the don'ts, Apple also urges against drying your iPhone with an external heat source or compressed air, or inserting a "foreign object," such as a cotton swab or a paper towel, into the Lightning or USB-C port.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #934, Feb. 13, 2024. Today's theme is "The Temptation of Cheap Third Party Lenses." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It's hard to resist the siren call of super-affordable Chinese-made optics. For the price of a polarizer, we can fill gaps in our lens library that we might not otherwise be able to afford. But even at a modest price, do these accessories provide the quality we need for our work? The answer is "yes," and "no." Find out why on today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 934

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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The Temptation of Cheap Third Party Lenses

20mm-Zf-2048.jpeg

There are lenses that we use all of the time - 24mm, 40mm, 85mm - and lenses that we use every now and then. For our everyday work, I recommend sticking with optics that we know we can depend on, usually manfactured by the camera brand they are being mounted on.

But what about those lenses we only use some of the time? Should we pay a premium for those as well?

I was looking for a super-wide for the Nikon Zf. I wanted an optic that could cover more ground than my current 24mm. The Nikon NIKKOR Z 20mm S with a maximum aperture of f/1.8 has an overall rating of 4.9 and costs $1,046. It is 4.27" long and weighs just over a pound. It uses a 77mm front filter.

The Viltrox 20mm Z has a maximum aperture of f/2.8, no star ratings yet on Amazon, and costs $158. It is 2.7" long, weighs 6.1 ounces, and uses a 52mm front filter.

Lens construction differences between the two optics are different, but not as much as you might think. The Viltrox has 10 elements in 8 groups with 7 aperture blades. The Nikon has 14 elements in 11 groups with 9 aperture blades. Both optics have quiet AF and manual focus, and nano multilayer coating on the elements. And both work well on the Nikon Zf.

We know that the Nikon 20mm performs well. But what about the Viltrox? I did a little testing with it mounted on the Nikon Zf. Here's what I found.

  • Autofocusing was quiet and smooth. Feels a tad slower than the Nikon, but very much in the acceptable range.
  • Sharpness was very good across the entire frame at f/5.6 and above. At f/2.8 and f/4 sharpness was good, but not as crisp in the corners.
  • Strong vignetting apparent at f/2.8. The effect diminished at f/4 and above.
  • Close-up performance (7.5") is quite good.
  • Lens flare and CA were well controlled.

So, right out of the camera, the Viltrox doesn't compete well against the Nikon. It's a stop slower, doesn't focus as fast, and doesn't perform its best wide open.

But I worked the files a bit in Capture One Pro. Here's what I did.

In Lens Correction, I selected the Nikon AF 20mm f/2.8 D profile. In that same panel, I increased sharpness and compensated for Light Falloff. In the Base Characteristics panel, I used the Nikon Zf Neutral profile. I then processed the image normally including a little devignetting. The finished RAW file looked very good.

The bottom line here is if you're willing to spend a little time in post-processing massaging the RAW files, you can get good results from the Viltrox 20mm f/2.8. And if you only need a super wide on occasion, then the extra time might be worth it.

However, if you want premium image quality and handling, then the Nikon Z is the superior way to go.

The Viltrox 20mm f/2.8 is available in both Nikon Z and Sony E mounts for $158.

Fujifilm and Skylum are Hosting 50 Free Photo Walks Across the U.S.

You can read the entire article at Petapixel.com.

Skylum, the company behind the Luminar Neo editing platform, and Fujifilm have partnered to host 50 free photo walks across the United States, giving photographers a chance to not only see their local cities in a new light but also try out new Fujifilm gear. The two companies say that this "experimental" new program was developed to inspire photographers to explore various metropolitan cities through their camera lenses on a series of guided photo walks where they will be surrounded by a like-minded community.

As part of the experience, participants will be able to try out Fujifilm's latest cameras and lenses and get face-to-face time with personnel from both companies.

"At almost every event in which Fujifilm participates, we look for an opportunity to integrate photo walks" Victor Ha, vice president of the Fujifilm North America Corporation, Electronic Imaging Division says.

"We see photo walks as incredibly important pieces of the creative process. They're not only a way to build camaraderie among creators, but also to allow them to make compelling images and content in real-world settings. We're excited to collaborate with Luminar Neo on these photo walks and to give local creators the tools needed to share ideas, expertise, and stories with each other, and the world."

The two companies say that regardless of skill level, these photo walks offer a unique chance to improve skills and also connect with the local community. The first photo walks are scheduled to take place in Las Vegas, Dallas, and Salt Lake City in March and the rest will take place throughout the month in cities like Portland, San Francisco, San Diego, Denver, Austin, Clearwater, Detroit, and many others.

The full schedule of events can be found on a dedicated Eventbrite page where registration is free. The company says more locations will be added over the next few days.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

The OM-1 Mark II: More Camera Than First Meets the Eye

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

The OM-1 Mark II has certainly caused a stir. Here's a deep dive into what this camera is all about and why it's another winner and a bigger upgrade than you might first think.

Special Features of the OM-1 Mark II

Upgraded: High Res Shot

This feature takes a series of photos in quick succession and combines them into a single 80-megapixel raw file and JPEG, now with the option of the raw file being 14-bit. That gives three times the number of tones in the image. There is a handheld 50-megapixel version too, taking advantage of the image stabilization.

Upgraded: Live ND Shooting

Saving you from carrying ND filters with you for long exposures, Live ND is an ND filter built into the camera. The OM-1 Mark II now gives up to seven stops, i.e., ND128. Although useful on its own, reducing the amount of gear you need to carry, it can be used in conjunction with an ND filter on your lens, delivering exceptionally long exposures even in bright daylight.

New: Live GND Shooting

As an alternative to Live ND, it's now possible to have one, two, or three stops of graduated ND filter applied to raw files and JPEGs by the camera. There are three levels of feathering of the graduation: soft, medium, and hard. You can also change the angle of the graduation.

Upgraded: Pro Capture and Blackout-Free Shooting

One of the huge upgrades of this camera is the doubling of the buffer size. If you are not aware of it, Pro Capture continuously buffers images and records the most recent of them when you press the shutter button. With continuous autofocus, the buffering is happening at 50 frames per second (fps), and it will buffer 256 frames. That's 5 seconds' worth of images. In that way, you should never miss a shot when a bird takes to the wing or when the bride kisses the groom.

With single autofocus, the camera records a staggering 120 fps and will buffer 213 shots.

The camera also has improved blackout-free sequential shooting.

Upgraded and New: AI Subject Detection Focusing

Another great option for wildlife photographers is the AI Subject Detection. I have found this excellent for detecting partially hidden birds, obscured by twigs and branches, and for latching onto birds in flight with cluttered backgrounds.

You can now also select individual subjects in crowded scenes. That's not only great for wildlife photographers but also events and wedding photographers, especially as Human Detection has been added. Furthermore, they are all accessible in the same place on the Super Control Panel, which gives quick access to important features.

I haven't tried the vehicular options, but the bird, animal, and the new human detection are outstandingly fast and precise.

Conclusion: Like its predecessor, the OM-1 Mark II is a camera that has continued to break the mold; it's definitely not a clone of every other camera out there, and it's good to see that OMDS are sticking to their guns and providing a product with features that tick the boxes of its user base. Consequently, it's already proving to be a popular choice.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #933, Feb. 6, 2024. Today's theme is "Documenting What Makes You, You." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

We have many more dimensions than most folks realize. Yes, in this community, we know each other for our photography. But each of us has far more going on than taking pictures. And we can use that skill to document - and share if we wish - the other areas of our life. Combining our love for photography with the things we enjoy. I will discuss one such example regarding me on this week's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 933

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Documenting What Makes You, You

I have lemon trees. Yes, multiple. At the studio, I have a miniature in a wine barrel on the back patio that is wildly prolific and produces the most delicious Meyers. At the house, we have two more small trees. And they seem happy as well.

So this time of year I find myself up to my hip boots in fruit. I have already perfected the art of homemade lemonade using Xylitol as the sweetener. Delicious. Theresa incorporates our bounty into a variety of entrees that enhance their appeal. And yet, there are still more lemons.

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So I searched the Internet for interesting things to do with our harvest. And I stumbled upon a recipe for making Limoncello, an Italian liqueur traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestive. "That sounds good," I thought. So I endeavored to make a California version with my Meyers.

The basic recipe involves soaking the lemon peels in grain alcohol for a few weeks, then straining, and finally adding simple syrup to sweeten. Limoncello is kept in the freezer and served in petite after-dinner liquor glasses.

Now even though the basic recipe is simple, the proportions are very important. And being the type of guy who strives for the best Limoncello west of the Atlantic, I document everything I do as I evolve the recipe. This is where the documentation comes into play.

For example: the first batch used 600 ML of Everclear 120 proof grain alcohol, the peels from 12 medium to medium-small Meyer lemons, and finished with 275 ML of homemade simple syrup.

But without photographs to accompany my documentation, how do I know in the future what a medium-small lemon looks like? How much peel from each lemon? How do I filter the concoction after infusion? And on and on.

So with each step, I photograph what's happening and label those images as part of Batch 1. And this part is as enjoyable as making the Limoncello itself.

During the weeks required for infusion, I'm on the hunt for cute bottles that would be appropriate for such a delicacy. And since I'm going to be making lemonade with the juice of those lemons, I need to gather all those parts as well.

This past Sunday, on a stormy day in Northern California, I finished the first batch, carefully placed the bottles in the freezer, and we sampled the finished product after dinner. Amazing!

The second batch is already underway. For reference, I have photos of every step from version 1 to accompany my precise measurements. I love the pictures almost as much as the drink itself.

So by now, you've probably figured out that I'm a hobby mixologist. I've created my own drinks from scratch, and have been able to copy others just by tasting them. I can now add Limoncello to my resume. And I have the pictures to prove it.

Capture One Lays Off Staff Amid a 'Significant' Internal Restructure

You can read the entire article at Petapixel.com.

Capture One is undergoing what it characterizes as "significant changes" internally which has resulted in an unspecified number of layoffs at the company. It is at least the second round of turnover since it announced it was switching to a subscription model.

PetaPixel first learned of the layoffs last week, but the company only confirmed them this morning.

"Last Monday we made an internal announcement about significant changes for the Capture One team. These are not actions we take lightly and the people that were affected by them were treated with respect and empathy," Capture One tells PetaPixel.

"Although we have nothing specific to announce today, as the photography industry continues to evolve and we at Capture One make progress with our strategy as a standalone company, we're implementing changes that align our investments with the areas where we're seeing increases in customer satisfaction and traction with our users.

"These changes are difficult, but we're confident they position us better to advance in our mission to provide professional photographers with the most powerful creative and collaboration tools."

The company did not provide details on how many were affected, but PetaPixel has learned that a significant portion of the communications team has been let go. Of note, this is the second time in the last year this particular team has been gutted. Not long after the announcement that the company would be moving to a subscription-only model, most of the public-facing communications team was let go. Around this time, Capture One also ended its contracts with external public relations support.

It is not clear at this time what kind of internal restructure the company is going through or its scale beyond the Capture One's own use of the word "significant," but the last year has been difficult for the company as it has grappled with widespread pushback in response to its announcement that it would move away from perpetual software licenses. It didn't help that the company made the announcement not long after it concluded a 50% off sale on perpetual licenses, leaving buyers feeling as though they had been bait and switched.

The move to a subscription model came with the promise that current customers would be rewarded for their loyalty, but details of that program later revealed it to just be a one-time discount, further raising the hackles of customers.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

'There is no such thing as a real picture': Samsung defends AI photo editing on Galaxy S24

You can read the entire article on techradar.com

Like most technology conferences in recent months, Samsung's latest Galaxy Unpacked event was dominated by conversations surrounding AI. From two-way call translation to gesture-based search, the Samsung Galaxy S24 launched with several AI-powered tricks up its sleeve - but one particular feature is already raising eyebrows.

Set to debut on the Galaxy S24 and its siblings, Generative Edit will allow users to artificially erase, recompose and remaster parts of an image in a bid to achieve photographic perfection. This isn't a new concept, and any edits made using this generative AI tech will result in a watermark and metadata changes. But the seamlessness with which the Galaxy S24 enables such edits has understandably left some Unpacked-goers concerned.

Samsung, however, is confident that its new Generative Edit feature is ethical, desirable and even necessary in today's misinformation-filled world. In a revealing interview with TechRadar, Samsung's Head of Customer Experience, Patrick Chomet, defended the company's position on AI and its implications.

"There was a very nice video by Marques Brownlee last year on the moon picture," Chomet told us. "Everyone was like, 'Is it fake? Is it not fake?' There was a debate around what constitutes a real picture. And actually, there is no such thing as a real picture. As soon as you have sensors to capture something, you reproduce [what you're seeing], and it doesn't mean anything. There is no real picture. You can try to define a real picture by saying, 'I took that picture', but if you used AI to optimize the zoom, the autofocus, the scene - is it real? Or is it all filters? There is no real picture, full stop."

"But still, questions around authenticity are very important," Chomet continued, "and we [Samsung] go about this by recognizing two consumer needs; two different customer intentions. Neither of them are new, but generative AI will accelerate one of them.

"One intention is wanting to capture the moment - wanting to take a picture that's as accurate and complete as possible. To do that, we use a lot of AI filtering, modification and optimization to erase shadows, reflections and so on. But we are true to the user's intention, which was to capture that moment. "Then there is another intention, which is wanting to make something. When people go on Instagram, they add a bunch of funky black and white stuff - they create a new reality. Their intention isn't to recreate reality, it's to make something new. So [Generative Edit] isn't a totally new idea. Generative AI tools will accelerate that intention exponentially in the next few years [...] so there is a big customer need to distinguish between the real and the new. That's why our Generative Edit feature adds a watermark and edits the metadata, and we're working with regulatory bodies to ensure people understand the difference." On the subject of AI regulation, Chomet said that Samsung "is very aligned with European regulations on AI," noting that governments are right to express early concerns around the potential implications of widespread AI use.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #932, Jan. 30, 2024. Today's theme is "A First Look at the OM System OM-1 Mark II." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Just in case you were wondering, OM System is not sitting on its laurels with the OM-1 that was released in March 2022. They've followed up their compact marvel with the Mark II. And on today's podcast, I'm going to tell you all about its feature highlights and who I think this camera is for. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 932

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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A First Look at the OM System OM-1 Mark II

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When you first look at the OM-1 Mark II, you will notice two things. First, the crown badge now reads OM System and not Olympus. The second, practically nothing else has changed on the outside. And if you're an OM-1 owner, that's a good thing because all of your accessories will work on the Mark II, including the external battery grip.

But underneath the hood there are upgrades and an intriguing new feature. Before we get to that, let's take a look at the spec highlights.

  • 5-axis image stabilization with up to 8.5 shutter speed steps compensation.
  • Eye-level OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 5.76M dots.
  • 3-inch vari-angle monitor (electrostatic capacitance touch panel), approx. 1.62M dots.
  • Dust and splash-proof (IP53 rated).
  • High-speed cross-type phase-detection AF (1,053 points).
  • High-speed contrast AF (1,053 points).
  • AI Detection AF - computational photography for identifying a variety of subjects.
  • Silent Sequential Shooting SH1 - approx. 120 fps with selectable 60, 100, and 120 fps without blackout.
  • 4K video recording and vertical video mode.
  • Sensor dust reduction via a supersonic wave filter.
  • World's first Live Graduated Neutral Density shooting functionality.
  • Can withstand freezing temperatures down to -10 degrees C.
  • 50 MP handheld high-resolution shot and 80 MP tripod high-resolution shot.
  • Compatibility with UVC (USB Video Class) and UAC (USB Audio Class), allowing seamless connection to a PC for use as a webcam.
  • Twin UHS-II SD memory card slots.

Grad ND - A Fascinating New Feature

This technology uses computational photography to replicate the effects of using a half-ND filter, allowing the photographer to control brightness and darkness within the image, much like an external graduated neutral density filter.

Through Live GND shooting, photographers can adjust filter steps (GND2, GND4, or GND8) and types (soft, medium, or hard) in real-time through the EVF or rear LCD. This function allows for customization of the effect's position and angle.

Without the need for physical filters attached to the lens, photographers can leverage half ND effects, even with lenses lacking filter threads.

More AI Autofocus

Developed using deep learning technologies, the AI Detection AF has been enhanced to recognize an extensive array of subjects, including humans, formula racing cars, motorcycles, airplanes, helicopters, trains, birds, and common animals such as dogs and cats. This integration enhances the well-established Face Priority/Eye Priority AF, significantly refining autofocus capabilities. It can accurately identify subjects, even when individuals are in profile, facing away, or obscured by hidden facial features.

Subjects are tracked within the frame, ensuring they remain in focus. The OM-1 Mark II can follow intricate details like driver's helmets or the eyes of birds and other animals, going beyond what photographers could normally do on their own.

Who Should Buy the OM System OM-1 Mark II?

Wildlife and birding enthusiasts are at the top of the list. For example, combined with the new OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-600mm f/5.0-6.3 IS lens that provides effective focal lengths of up to 1200mm, and weighs just over 2,000 grams (4.4 lbs), photographers can easily work with this rig all day, no tripod required. And that's just one of the many telephotos available.

The OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/4 PRO provides an effective reach of 80-300mm and weighs a mere 382 grams (13.5 oz). The f/2.8 version weighs 760 grams (1.67 lb) and accepts both 1.4X and 2X matched teleconverters. Other top-tier options include the Olympus 300mm f/4 PRO and the Panasonic Leica DG Elmarit 200mm f/2.8.

Macro photography is also a strength of this system. There are a variety of optics well-suited for this work. Add the increased depth of field resulting from the Micro Four Thirds sensor, and the OM-1 is a godsend for super closeup photography. Lens options include the OM SYSTEM M.Zuiko Digital ED 90mm f/3.5, 60mm f/2.8, and the 30mm f/3.5 macro optics.

Travel photographers and journalists would also benefit from this system. Rugged design, compactness, and versatility make the OM-1 Mark II perfect for those covering the world while traveling light.

That's not to say this isn't an excellent system for general photography. There are many capable interchangeable lens cameras available these days. But very few combine the strengths of the OM System in such a compact package.

Should OM-1 Owners Upgrade to the OM-1 Mark II?

I'm wrestling with this question myself. I have my OM-1 sitting here on my desk, looking as fresh and new as the day I bought it, and trying to decide if I should invest in the Mark II.

For dedicated Micro Four Thirds photographers who use the OM-1, the Mark II would provide a solid upgrade and allow the original OM-1 to serve as a secondary camera.

The Mark II has improved performance. For example, in Pro Capture mode, the Mark II allows for retrospective capture of approximately 99 frames, an increase over the OM-1's 70 frames. For sequential shooting, the OM-1 Mark II can capture 219 frames in JPEG format or 213 frames in RAW at 120 fps, a dramatic improvement over the OM-1's 92 frames for each.

Add the autofocusing speed improvement with new features such as Live GND and vertical video capture, those could be important upgrades depending on your photography needs. Keep in mind that you can continue to use all of your existing MFT lenses and OM-1 accessories with the Mark II.

The big question is, do these benefits justify the $2,399 price tag? That answer lies between you and your credit card.

The Bottom Line

The OM System OM-1 Mark II is a powerhouse interchangeable lens camera that provides more compact options (thanks to MFT lenses) than its full-frame competitors. The Mark II is especially appealing for serious photographers who venture outside of the studio into harsh environments and changing conditions, and who require the versatility of the vast Micro Four Thirds lens catalog.

Unless you're a stay-at-home kind of guy, or that you really like the cardio workouts that come with lugging lots of gear up a trail, I would say that the latest OM-1 Mark II is for you.

Meike Releases New 50mm F1.8 Autofocus Lens for Z/E Mount for $159

You can read more and place your order on the Meike Global site.

The lens is easy to carry and its images are sharp and clear at any aperture. The band new 50mm/F1.8 uses the newest optical structure, making it able to achieve a large aperture of F1.8 while maintaining miniaturization and lightweight. Multi-layer coating technology is used on both sides of the lens to restore more realistic colors. The lens is not easy to attach dust or stains, and can be easily wiped clean.

The Nikon Z mount is available now. The Sony E mount will be available by the end of February 2024.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Why You Should Print Your Photos

You can watch the video and read the article on FStoppers.com

Printing images is a rewarding yet often overlooked aspect of photography. This process transforms digital captures into tangible art, playing a pivotal role in a photographer's creative expression and giving you a meaningful way to display your work.

Coming to you from Simon Baxter, this insightful video begins with Baxter sharing his passion for woodland photography and his meticulous approach to printing. He emphasizes the importance of not rushing the process, allowing images to mature over time. Baxter's philosophy resonates with photographers who view their work as a continual process rather than a series of isolated events. His method of revisiting and editing images based on evolving emotional connections is particularly interesting. This philosophy, treating each step from shooting to printing as interconnected, enriches the final artwork and imbues it with deeper personal significance.

Baxter also highlights the technical aspects of printing, such as monitor calibration and paper selection, underscoring their impact on the final print. His detailed explanation of how different papers can influence the mood and texture of an image provides valuable insights for photographers striving to fully realize their artistic intent. This attention to detail in the printing process is a testament to the craftsmanship that goes into each piece and how even small differences can affect the final output. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Baxter.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #931, Jan. 23, 2024. Today's theme is "5 Upcoming Photography Conferences to Consider." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

In a recent edition of my Nimble Photographer Newsletter, I wrote about the dearth of photo announcements at CES 2024. But that doesn't mean there aren't other events that will cater to our desire to learn more and see the latest in imaging equipment. This week, I'll share with you 5 upcoming events that will stimulate your mind and tempt your pocketbook. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 931

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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5 Upcoming Photography Conferences to Consider

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Sometimes it feels like all the cool photo shows have gone away. But that isn't the case. And if you'd like to get out among your peers, here are five upcoming events to consider.

Imaging U.S.A. - Jan. 28-30, Louisville, Kentucky

Imaging USA features classes, networking opportunities, and a huge trade show to help you feel inspired and ready to grow your photography business. This year we're bringing all the education and excitement to the Derby City. And to make your experience even more rewarding, pre-con classes are available in the days leading up to the conference.

90+ speakers, 130+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Capture One
  • Fujifilm North America
  • Godox
  • PlatyPod
  • Sigma
  • SmallRig
  • Tamron
  • Zeiss

Three-day all-access pass is $459. Expo only pass is free.

Camera & Imaging Photo Show CP+, February 22-25, 2024, Pacifico Yokohama, Japan

"Nothing Stays the Same" - CP+ is an event where camera fans from all over the world gather to see, touch, and share the joy of photography and video with their friends! For four days from February 22nd (Thu) to February 25th (Sun), 2024, an on-site event held at Pacifico Yokohama and an online event distributed online will be held simultaneously. Anyone can enjoy it, from camera and photography enthusiasts to those who regularly take and edit photos and videos with their smartphones and enjoy their daily lives using SMS.

60+ speakers, 90+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Epson
  • Fujifilm
  • Godox
  • Lexar
  • Lumix
  • OM System
  • Sigma
  • Synology
  • Tamron

Admission is free, but you must pre-register for onsite admission.

WPPI, March 3-7, 2024, Las Vegas, Nevada

For five days each year, portrait and wedding photographers and videographers come together in Las Vegas to be inspired. Be a part of this remarkable community - evolve your aesthetic, gain invaluable strategies to grow your business, connect with friends, be dazzled by stories from industry icons and create lasting memories.

130+ speakers, 80+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Capture One
  • PlatyPod
  • Godox
  • Sigma
  • Skylum
  • SmallRig
  • Tamron
  • Tenba

Four-day all-access pass is $199. Expo only pass is $49.

The Photography and Video Show, March 16-19, 2024, Birmingham, UK

From long exposure and layering, to business skills and incorporating AI into your workflow, your entry ticket will give you access to more than 350 seminars and live demos, with six stages and theatres to choose from. Led by experts and legends of photography, filmmaking and content creation, be prepared to learn new techniques and approaches; and be inspired to change your perspective on how you create!

100+ speakers, 200+ exhibitors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Nikon
  • Sony
  • Capture One
  • Epson
  • Fujifilm
  • Gitzo
  • Godox
  • Ilford
  • Lowepro
  • Lumix
  • Manfrotto
  • OM System
  • Synology
  • Skylum
  • Tenba

48 pounds for a 4-day pass

Shutterfest, April 2-4, St. Louis, MO.

ShutterFest is an annual photography event that brings together thousands of professional photographers, photo enthusiasts, and industry experts from around the world. This event is unique in its approach to education and community building. Instead of focusing on traditional lecture-style presentations, ShutterFest offers hands-on classes, interactive experiences, and networking opportunities that help attendees develop their skills, build relationships, and grow their businesses.

One of the things that makes ShutterFest so unique is its focus on creativity and hands-on learning. Rather than providing a one-size-fits-all approach to photography, the conference encourages photographers to explore their own unique style and vision. The sessions are designed to help attendees break out of their comfort zones and try new techniques, styles, and approaches to their work. This emphasis on experimentation is what attracts many photographers to ShutterFest year after year.

What else makes ShutterFest so unique? The conference is designed to be a welcoming and inclusive space where photographers of all skill levels and backgrounds can connect, share their work, and learn from one another. This sense of community is built through a variety of events, including group shoots, networking sessions, and social events.

60+ speakers and 30+ vendors

Top Brands on the Expo Floor

  • Canon
  • Sigma
  • Westcott
  • Background Town
  • Tamron

Registration is $240 for classes and tradeshow.

Las Vegas Criminalizes Stopping For Selfies on Pedestrian Bridges

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com

On Tuesday, Las Vegas began enforcing a new ordinance that bans people from "stopping, standing or engaging in an activity that causes another person to stop" on pedestrian bridges and up to 20 feet surrounding connected stairs, escalators, and elevators.

Offenders who violate the measure could face a misdemeanor charge. If found guilty, they could face up to six months in jail or a $1,000 fine.

Clark County officials in Nevada, who voted unanimously to approve the measure earlier this month, say that the ban is not intended to target people stopping to take selfies or tourists pausing to watch and take photos of street performers.

Instead, Clark County officials claimed that the measure is intended to reduce crime and increase public safety by ensuring a continuous flow of pedestrian traffic across the bridges.

"The Pedestrian Flow Zone ordinance will help to ensure our world-class tourism destination remains a safe place for people to visit," Jennifer Cooper, Clark County's chief communications and strategy officer, says in a statement.

Restrictions on the Las Vegas Strip come two months after the Las Vegas Grand Prix -- where pedestrians crowded on bridges to take photos of the event -- and only six weeks before the Super Bowl in February, which is set to draw hundreds of thousands of people for those events.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #930, Jan. 16, 2024. Today's theme is "Looking Back and More, Now 2024." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Every January I close out my personal photo library from the previous year and start fresh with an empty catalog. Not only is this a practical endeavor, it's also an opportunity to acknowledge the highlights of the previous year. Today, I share the benefits of this annual exercise. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 930

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Looking Back and More, Now 2024

2023-in-review-1024.jpg

Despite my trials and tribulations in the past with Apple's Aperture, I still create annual libraries and store the neatly bundled catalogs in my multi-level archival system.

Why? It's just the way my brain works. I measure my life's journey signpost by signpost, year by year. Plus, I've discovered some additional benefits to this practice, a few of which I'm going to share today.

The Technical Part

By way of review, I maintain two personal libraries. The first, Photos, is totally automatic. I take a picture with my iPhone, it's added to my Photos library, backed up in iCloud, and that's that.

But I also have a Capture One Catalog. Pictures from my OM-1, X100V, and Nikon Zf are stored and edited here. Compared to the iPhone catalog, these images are more measured, captured in RAW, edited with C1P's excellent adjustment tools, and organized using its catalog tools.

Often, there is some topic duplication between the catalogs. And this is a good thing. Let's take our workshop in Sedona, AZ for example. My iPhone pictures go directly into Photos, while the images from the OM-1 are stored in Capture One Pro.

If I want to locate a shoot from years past, I can rely on the A.I. object recognition tools in Photos to help me remember the month and year. Who knows, I might even have an image there that suits my needs.

But if I want the more "serious" shots, I know exactly which Capture One Catalog to open. It saves me a tremendous amount of time. And it allows me to rotate off my laptop drive those big image libraries from previous years.

The Fun Part

So the technical part is all good and well. Every one of us has our own system for managing and retrieving pictures. But I've discovered an added benefit too. One that I hadn't anticipated.

It's easy to forget how much cool stuff happens in just a single year. Sure, we may still be basking in the glow of an event from last week, or even last month. But a couple of seasons ago. Those can get buried beneath the rigors of day-to-day life.

This short stroll down memory lane reminds me that 2023 was a better year than I realized. And it helps me appreciate the good fortune of my life. Want to join me for a quick trip?

[review highlights from my 2023 catalog.]

As a result of this exercise, I have a much more complete memory of my past year. Sure it had its challenges. There's a substantial 8-week lull when I was laid up with my recovery from the total joint replacement in my hip. But I still managed to take pictures around the house to maintain my sanity.

We are so busy, so distracted, and at times, so frustrated with daily life. It's easy to lose perspective. But looking back on my past year in pictures adds balance to my view of 2023. And it helps me appreciate the good moments in life all the more.

The Camera Accessory That Saved My Workflow? Peak Design Tech Pouch Review

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

If you're like me, you have a whole bunch of small photography bits--cables, connectors, SD cards, batteries, and more--in your camera bag. If you were to use a different bag, you'd have to take all of them out and transfer them over. That's how I lived for the first couple of years of my career, and it was awful.

I would always be triple- and quadruple-checking to make sure I had everything, sometimes forgetting which pocket I had moved it to and having to dig around in a panic. That's when I had to find a better way. Enter the Peak Design Tech Pouch.

For months, I started looking at different tech organizers to ideally hold all the random bits that I had between my camera bags. At the time, there were fewer competitors to the tech pouch. What I saw with the others was that they were either more tech/note organizers for office workers carrying far fewer things at once, or they were full sling bags, and I really wasn't looking for either. All I wanted was a simple organizer with photographers in mind that could handle all my random crap and move it seamlessly between bags.

While it is larger than other tech organizers, I find the size just about perfect to fit in the extra space of a camera bag. It's not so big that it's in the way of other gear that you could be carrying. It's also not too small that it can't carry everything that you need it to.

Having used this for a few years now, I can confirm that it is built to last. I try to be gentle with my gear as I like it to last a while, but I definitely don't baby things. Through all the time of use, this bag hardly has a blemish on it, let alone any substantial damage. All the external and internal zips work great, and still keep things dry if it's a rainier day.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

The 'Millennium Camera' Will Capture Arizona's Landscape for 1,000 Years

You can read the entire article on PetaPixel.com

An experiment organized by University of Arizona research associate and experimental philosopher Jonathan Keats, the Millennium Camera is meant to record an extremely long-exposure image that won't be complete for 100 decades.

The concept of the camera isn't too far removed from the beer can camera that Regina Valkenborgh set up at the Bayfordbury Observatory in the United Kingdom in 2012. In that case, the pinhole-style camera was in place for eight years and one month and captured what was at the time believed to be the longest exposure photo ever made.

If it works as planned, Keats' Millennium Camera will have that record beat by a lot more. It uses a similar pinhole design as Valkenborgh's beer can camera, but has elements made to extend the time the camera will operate. That pinhole leads to a thin sheet of 24-karat gold that will slowly let light through to a small copper cylinder mounted on top of a steel pole. Over the course of 1,000 years, the landscape in front of the pinhole camera will slowly fade a light-sensitive surface that is coated in thin layers of rose madder (an oil paint pigment), The University of Arizona explains.

In 100 decades, future humans will hopefully be able to open the Millennium Camera to reveal a long-exposure image of the area through all of the changes Tuscon will undergo. That is, of course, the hope anyway.

"One thousand years is a long time and there are so many reasons why this might not work," Keats says. "The camera might not even be around in a millennium. There are forces of nature and decisions people make, whether administrative or criminal, that could result in the camera not lasting."

If it does work, however, Keats says that the final image will likely show the longest-lasting features -- like mountains and rocks -- sharpest while the most dynamic parts such as the city itself will be softer. "Sharp" is also used loosely, as the land itself is not completely stable and will experience subtle motion over the extended exposure time.

The Millennium Camera is currently installed on Tumamoc Hill next to a bench that faces west over the Star Pass neighborhood of Tuscon. With it is a small plaque that encourages visitors to imagine what the future holds.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Nikkor Z 26mm f/2.8 pancake has been a polarizing lens. Those who really like it, such as myself, appreciate its compactness and terrific image quality. While others think it's too slow focusing and noisy.

IMG_0730.jpeg 26mm Z with included lens hood on a Nikon Zf.

After spending some time with this wide angle on my Nikon Zf full-frame mirrorless camera, I can say that the 26mm has been wonderful for travel, street photography, and events. Let's take a closer look to see what you think.

IMG_0747.jpeg 26mm Z, no lens hood, mounted on a Nikon Zf.

What I Like About the Nikkor Z 26mm

  • Compact (0.9" long)
  • Wide Angle of View (79 degrees)
  • Bright Maximum Aperture (f/2.8)
  • Dust and Drip Resistant
  • Metal Lens Mount and Solid Construction
  • Outstanding Center Sharpness
  • Close Focusing Capability Is Very Useful
  • Includes Clever Lens Hood and Slip-On Cap
  • Looks Fantastic on the Nikon Zf

What I Don't Like About the Nikkor Z 26mm

Some reviewers have complained about the focusing noise. Yes, you can hear it - not so much on the street, but sitting in a quiet room. So I would say that this isn't an optic for weddings and funerals. But for my purposes, noise isn't an issue.

Another complaint I've read is that it is slow-focusing. For example, if you compare it to the Nikkor Z 50mm f/1.8 S ($626 and 3" long), the 26mm will be slower. It's even slower than my Nikkor Z 24mm-50mm zoom. That being said, I don't think I lost one shot in San Francisco due to its focusing ability. My recommendation is that you don't use it for fast-action photography.

Photography is about tradeoffs - figuring out what you need for a shoot, and what you can live without. In my view, the Nikkor Z 26mm f/2.8 is well-suited for travel photography, urban work, and most events. Its pluses are compactness, a relatively fast aperture, and excellent sharpness.

Bottom Line

Once you recover from having spent $200 more than you would have for the Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 lens, you're likely going to be happy with your investment. The 26mm f/2.8 is a gem of a lens. It makes full-frame photography so much more portable. And the images it produces are beautiful.

A Few Pictures with the Nikkor Z 26mm on a Nikon Zf

ZF1_1319-12-03 San Francisco Zf-1024.jpg

ZF1_1289-12-03 San Fran-1024-V2.jpg

ZF1_1414-12-03 San Francisco Zf-1024.jpg

IMG_0738.jpeg

Photos by Derrick Story.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #929, Jan. 9, 2024. Today's theme is "The Elephant in the Room - Nikon Zf vs Olympus OM-1." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Typically, Micro Four Thirds photographers aren't concerned by new full-frame camera announcements. They know what they have, and they like it. But the Nikon Zf seems to have upset the apple cart a bit. I've been getting mail citing reviews, defections, and the relevance of MFT photography in light of all this. So let's talk about it. Let's go head to head with the Olympus OM-1 and Nikon Zf. Today's top story on the TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 929

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

The Elephant in the Room - Nikon Zf vs Olympus OM-1

Zf-vs-OM1-1024.jpeg

Let's set the stage a bit for this comparison. The OM System OM-1 was released in March 2022. It has a Micro Four Thirds sensor and is currently selling for $1,999.

The Nikon Zf started shipping in October 2023, employs a full-frame sensor, and is currently available for $1,996.

Even though the two cameras use completely different sensors, they are competitors. They cost about the same, appeal to serious enthusiasts, have appealing body designs, and are packed with the latest that imaging technology has to offer.

But they are very different cameras in many ways too. So let's take a look at their respective strengths and compare them.

OM System OM-1 Strengths

  • Telephoto Muscle - Anything over 105mm usually means the OM-1. My favorite combination is the 40-150mm f/2.8 with or without the 1.4X teleconverter.
  • Macro Photography - The Micro Four Thirds System is just so good at close-up photography. I have both the 60mm and 30mm macros.
  • Inclement Weather - I'm comfortable shooting with the OM-1 in just about any environment. It's a robust companion during outdoor adventures.
  • Long Days - If I'm going to be on my feet with gear for the bulk of the day, I want the OM System.
  • Carry-On Air Travel - I can put together a kit for an entire trip in a bag about the size of a kid's lunchbox - and have everything I need.
  • Clever Technology - Live ND, Live Time, Live Composite, in-camera focus stacking, are all examples of the cool tech OM System includes in their cameras.
  • More Lenses - Not only does the Micro Four Thirds lens catalog feature practically any optic that I could need, it also usually has multiple versions of it in different sizes and maximum apertures.

Nikon Zf Strengths

  • Street Photography - I know it sounds weird, but I prefer the Zf for street photography and urban exploration. With the pancake 26mm f/2.8 and the compact 24-50mm zoom, the camera has a nice balance and can work just about any angle.
  • Low Light Situations - I've never had a camera where I could increase the ISO to 25,600 without a second thought about quality.
  • Vintage Lenses - Nothing comes close to the Zf for vintage lens work. With the FTZ II adapter, I can use my Steve McCurry 105mm f/2.5 tele one moment, and the wonderful Nikkor G 24-85mm zoom the next. With no crop factor to contend with, the lens I put on there is the lens I get.
  • Portrait Assignments - I had been using the Nikon D610 for portrait work, a camera that I still very much like, but the Zf is an entirely different planet. Features like built-in Skin Softening and Portrait Enhancement make the job so much easier.
  • Aestetics - In my opinion, only the Olympus PEN-F rivals the handsome looks of the Nikon Zf.

Why Switching Doesn't Make Sense

I could never imagine a scenario when I would sell all of my Olympus gear to bulk up the Nikon Z system. For me, it would be like saying that I'm going to sell my pliers to buy a screwdriver.

But depending on what type of photographer you are, you may feel that you need a little bit of both. I realize that this is a total luxury. But as long as I'm traveling for photography workshops, covering events, and working in the unpredictable outdoors, I will be using my OM-1 system.

At the same time, I loved shooting with the Nikon Zf in San Francisco, capturing portraits with it for a recent article, and walking into a darkened haunted house, then emerging with incredible shots for the customer.

I wouldn't recommend investing in pricy, hefty full-frame telephotos for the Z System. Compact wide angles and short zooms are a better fit. When it's time to go to Safari West this coming Autumn for a workshop, I'll be packing the OM-1 with 40-150mm f/2.8 zoom, and the 1.4X teleconverter.

Now, I think OM System can quiet a lot of this chatter by releasing a great camera (or two) in 2024. In the meantime, if you own an OM-1 and are happy with it, ignore the switchers. And if your budget allows for another camera, I think the Zf would be a lovely complement to your existing system.

Basic Lens Kit for Each Camera

For the OM-1, I have a super-compact kit that includes the 14-42mm EZ Olympus zoom, Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II, 45mm f/1.8 Olympus prime, and the 35-100mm Panasonic zoom.

For the Nikon Zf I'm packing the 26mm f/2.8 pancake, 40mm f/2.0 SE, 24-50mm compact zoom, and the Nikon G 24-85mm zoom with the FTZ II adapter.

How To Turn Your Apple Watch Into A Camera Remote And Timer

You can read the entire article on SlashGear.com

How many times do you use your iPhone camera in a day? If you're a photography enthusiast, content creator, or just someone who loves collecting snapshots of their favorite memories, you've probably answered "a lot." It's no surprise, though, considering the quality of the output and the many nifty photo editing features built into the iPhone. However, if you're using your iPhone camera a lot, then you're probably also familiar with the all too frustrating problem of wanting to pose a few meters away but being unable to run back and forth to set up your iPhone's camera timer´┐Żover and over. It can be quite a chore no doubt, especially when you're out and about and don't have the luxury of bringing a tripod with a remote.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch has your back. This versatile device on your wrist can actually double as a camera remote and timer for your iPhone, so you won't have to waste a good photo or video opportunity ever again. Here's a quick guide on how to use it as such.

Spring in Sedona Photography Workshop

April 16-19, 2024 - TDS photographers return to the greater Sedona, AZ area, but this time during the Spring to view the landscape in a whole new way. We will explore iconic locations, picturesque landscapes, mysterious vortexes, and towns frozen in time from the mining days. What a great way to kick off our 2024 workshop season!

You can learn more and reserve your spot by clicking here. Hope to see you in April!

Follow Up to My Escape to San Francisco

During last week's podcast I discussed how I had come down with a serious case of cabin fever, and my plan to overcome it. I'm happy to report that the therapy treatment in San Francisco solved the problem.

If you want to read about my adventure, and see all the pictures, check out this free link to my article titled, 26mm and Be There.

It's amazing how therapeutic a photo shoot can be.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #928, Jan. 2, 2024. Today's theme is "All Dressed Up with Nowhere to Go" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I have just taken my 100th portrait of the cat. All the blooms have fallen off the Christmas Cactus in the window box. As I sit here watching the rain outside, surrounded by all of this great camera gear, I'm jonesing for a photo adventure. But not today. How I plan to cope with my internment is the lead story in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 928

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

All Dressed Up with Nowhere to Go

IMG_0713.jpeg

I feel like one of those guys with an electronic ankle bracelet, wandering around the studio with a Nikon Zf around my neck looking for something compelling to photograph.

Now I know how the cat feels. I watch her explore every corner of the living room in search of something to play with. Sometimes she lucks out and finds an unlucky bug. Poor little bugger. His minutes are numbered.

So I take a picture of the cat. She looks for spiders. And the rain keeps pouring down.

Don't get me wrong. I'm thankful for the rain. It is filling our reservoirs and adding fresh water to my open barrels in the backyard. And sometimes I even take pictures in the rain. But it isn't really fun. And it doesn't last for long.

I've figured out all sorts of cool things during my interment. I've adapted my favorite Pentax lens, the Pentax HD DA 70mm f/2.4 Limited Lens, to my OM-1. It's going to be fantastic for landscape and portraits with its 140mm equivalent focal length on my favorite all-time cropped sensor camera. But not today.

I've been testing the amazing NIKKOR Z 26mm f/2.8 pancake lens on the Nikon Zf. The combo is so addictive that I walk around the studio with it all day. But this thoroughbred needs to run. And today is not that day.

I've reorganized both of my camera kits a dozen times. Should I include the 45mm f/1.8 or the 45mm f/1.2 with the OM-1? Is there enough room for both the 40mm and 50mm in my Nikon bag? Maybe I should start over.

I even pulled out all of my tripods yesterday and started switching their heads. Now I have a Joby head on the Induro and the Induro head on the Manfrotto. Anything other than a Manfrotto head is an improvement.

Finally, after this low point, I decided that I needed to do something meaningful. And fortunately, an opportunity presented itself.

Theresa gifted me and the boys tickets to a Saturday Warriors game. I checked the weather report, and there's no rain that afternoon. So I got out my street photography black shirt, oversized jacket, and gray Warriors cap. I tucked the Zf with 26mm pancake into a softball-sized shoulder pouch that I could wear inside of my jacket, and put the iPhone 15 Pro Max in my front jeans pocket.

I'll arrive in the City a couple hours before I'm to meet the boys and engage in some serious photography. Then I'll catch the Metro T down to Mission Bay to meet the boys. My super compact pouch meets the bag requirements for Chase Center, and the short lens won't get me in trouble.

The three of us will then enjoy the game, and then I will reverse course back to the parking garage at the north end of The City, shooting pictures all along the way.

If this plan works, I will have much to report next week. Stay tuned. (I'm totally excited!)

Why One Photographer Prefers Micro Four Thirds

You can read the entire article on FStoppers.com

How Websites Have Become Practically Unuseable

A short commentary.

Virtual Camera Club News

The Nimble Photographer Newsletter is now publishing every Thursday. Readers will enjoy a variety of content spanning from short photo essays, to commentary on weekly events, to reviews of the latest and coolest photo gear.

TDS Workshops! - You can sign up for available workshops by visiting The Nimble Photographer. Inner Circle Members receive a 10-percent discount on all events.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! We are having a blast at our new Inner Circle hangout, the private group I've set up at DerrickStoryOnline. We'd love it if you join us. You can become an Inner Circle Member by signing up at our Patreon site. You will automatically be added to the new hangout.

Great Photography Articles on Live View - If you check out our publication and appreciate what you see, be sure to follow us and clap for those authors. You can find us at medium.com/live-view.

If you're interested in writing for Live View, drop me a line at dstory@gmail.com.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.