Recently in Photography

  Page 2 of 363 in Photography  

This is The Digital Story Podcast #804, Aug. 17, 2021. Today's theme is "It's Not: What's the Best Software; It's: What's Best for You." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I just read a good Capture One Pro vs Lightroom Classic article on DP Review. The comparison focused on speed with C1P coming out on top. But that doesn't mean it's the best, or even the best for you. I'll explain in more detail on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Digital Photography Podcast 804

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

It's Not: What's the Best Software? It's: What's Best for You

We really do like to know who is Number One. I just went through a version of this when I was shopping for our next workshop vehicle. "The number one EV is..."

Number One think permeates many different decision-making areas. What's the best mirrorless camera? Where's the best place to go take pictures? And what's the best software to process my images?

IMG_0779.jpeg

Today, we're going to focus on the last one. I have five questions that depending on your answers will lead you to the best image management software for you. Here we go!

  • How important is overall speed for you? Capture One Pro and Photos for macOS are tops in this category.
  • How important is top-shelf RAW processing? Capture One Pro usually wins here.
  • How big is your legacy library? If it is substantial, and it is a Lightroom catalog, then this gives Lightroom an edge because migration is a pain in the butt.
  • How important are cloud connectivity and mobile apps? Lightroom gets the nod here, with Photos also in the mix.
  • How important is overall cost (time invested plus actual payments)? Photos is the easiest to learn and is free. Lightroom is very accessible and is reasonably priced. Capture One Pro has a steep learning curve and is overall more expensive.

Now here's the fun part: tally the winners in each category and note what software you should be using? Chances are, it's not what you currently have.

For many non-professionals, Photos for macOS would be the winner. And for many professionals, Capture One Pro would likely come out on top. Yet, we know that the most popular image management software is Lightroom. Why is that?

Because there are a million little things that are both important to us and unique to us as well. And those little things are what determine the best product for us individually.

Let's go back to my car comparison. For me personally, the VW ID.4 was head and shoulders above the competition that included Tesla and the Ford MachE. Now depending on what review you read, the ID.4 could fare as well as first or as low as 5th for best EV for 2021.

But it was those little things, such as comfort and storage for workshop attendees in a car that drives like a sedan. It's the ability for me to sleep comfortably in the cabin while looking at the stars through the panorama roof. It's the 3 years of free high-speed charging. And the list goes on and on.

For you, the best EV could be something completely different, including not an EV at all.

You may not be using the best software, mirrorless camera, or driving the best car. But my hope is that through the time we spend together, you discover the perfect tools for you, know that I stand behind your decision 100 percent.

New Training Course! Mobile Photography: Image Management

What do you do with the plethora of photos on your smartphone after taking them? It's easy to have hundreds, if not thousands, of photos in your library, but it isn't so easy to back up and keep track of them. In this course, get tips on how to manage your ever-growing mobile photography collection.

I delve into several different backup and organizational methods for both Android and iOS devices, highlighting the benefits and risks of each approach. Plus, I share tips for enhancing the appearance of your shots right on your mobile device.

Discover how to leverage your iPad as a mobile photography studio, transfer images from your digital camera to your mobile device, back up and edit photos with Lightroom, and much more.

Mobile Photography: Image Management is a course that practically anyone who enjoys photography on their smartphone would enjoy. Take a look and see what you think.

Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight Review - Portable and Powerful

One of the most important items I keep in the car glovebox is a good flashlight. It needs to be compact, durable, and versatile. My choice for the new VW ID.4 is the Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight.

This device is impressive. And if you're a flashlight geek like me, you'll see what I mean when you look at the specs. Let's start with the output. (Keep in mind that this light is only 4.65" long and weighs just a few ounces.)

Outputs

  • Turbo 3000 Lumens/1.1 Hours/787 Feet
  • High 1200 Lumens/2.4 Hours/492 Feet
  • Med 450 Lumens/7.9 Hours/295 Feet
  • Low 150 Lumens/20 Hours/164 Feet
  • Eco 50 Lumens/50 Hours/98 Feet
  • Strobe 3000 Lumens

I use it in Eco mode for digging around in my camera bag or backpack. It's plenty bright to help me find what I want, but not so blinding that I lose my night vision. When working outside at night, Low and Medium modes provide plenty of illumination. I don't think I've needed the High mode for anything (it's really bright), but it's good to know that it's there.

One of the features that I really like is that the included rechargeable battery has a built-in USB-C port. So I can top off the flashlight right there in the car using its outputs. Very handy!

The Fenix E35 is also quite durable.

  • IP68 Rated
  • 3.2' Impact Resistance
  • Single Switch Control
  • Pocket Clip Included
  • Cold Resistance -35°C to 45°C
  • Aluminum Body A6061-T6
  • Intelligent memory circuit, last-used output recall
  • Lockout Function

You can check the battery status at any time. When the light is off, single-click the control button, and the status light on the button will illuminate. Steady green means you're in great shape all the way through flashing red that means it's time to recharge. (To turn on the flashlight, you long-click that same button.)

Other nice touches include the titanium body clip that allows you to secure the light on your bag or belt and a lanyard to keep around your wrist while in use.

If you haven't treated yourself to a new flashlight in a while, the Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight is hands down my first choice. You can buy it directly from the Fenix site for $69 with free U.S. shipping. If you sign up for their newsletter, you'll get 20 percent off.

First Camping Test with the VW ID.4 This Week

As I continue to prepare for our upcoming Oregon Coast Photography Workshop in November, I'm putting the ID.4 through a variety of pre-event tests. The first one is this week.

I'm heading out for a camping trip where I'll have the car in isolated areas and will be testing gear for longer events. I'll also be sleeping in the car cabin.

Side note here: I've already been napping in the back during charging at commercial stations. My original intention was to get work done during the 30-minute charging sessions. But I've found myself stretched out and napping more and working less.

Part of my test will be seeing how well Level II chargers work when off the beaten track and away from the high-speed network.

I'll report on all of this during next week's TDS podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.) We have a new poll on the Patreon site for our members: Are You Looking to Buy a New Camera in 2021? Be sure to stop by and chime in.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 40 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of the most important items I keep in the car glovebox is a good flashlight. It needs to be compact, durable, and versatile. My choice for the new VW ID.4 is the Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight.

P8141902-USB-C-Flashlight-1024.jpg

This device is impressive. And if you're a flashlight geek like me, you'll see what I mean when you look at the specs. Let's start with the output. (Keep in mind that this light is only 4.65" long and weighs just a few ounces.)

Outputs

  • Turbo 3000 Lumens/1.1 Hours/787 Feet
  • High 1200 Lumens/2.4 Hours/492 Feet
  • Med 450 Lumens/7.9 Hours/295 Feet
  • Low 150 Lumens/20 Hours/164 Feet
  • Eco 50 Lumens/50 Hours/98 Feet
  • Strobe 3000 Lumens

I use it in Eco mode for digging around in my camera bag or backpack. It's plenty bright to help me find what I want, but not so blinding that I lose my night vision. When working outside at night, Low and Medium modes provide plenty of illumination. I don't think I've needed the High mode for anything (it's really bright), but it's good to know that it's there.

One of the features that I really like is that the included rechargeable battery has a built-in USB-C port. So I can top off the flashlight right there in the car using its outputs. Very handy!

P8141907-USB-C-Flashlight-1024.jpg Charging the Fenix battery in the VW ID.4 via a USB-C cable.

The Fenix E35 is also quite durable.

  • IP68 Rated
  • 3.2' Impact Resistance
  • Single Switch Control
  • Pocket Clip Included
  • Cold Resistance -35°C to 45°C
  • Aluminum Body A6061-T6
  • Intelligent memory circuit, last-used output recall
  • Lockout Function

You can check the battery status at any time. When the light is off, single-click the control button, and the status light on the button will illuminate. Steady green means you're in great shape all the way through flashing red that means it's time to recharge. (To turn on the flashlight, you long-click that same button.)

Other nice touches include the titanium body clip that allows you to secure the light on your bag or belt and a lanyard to keep around your wrist while in use.

P8141905-USB-C-Flashlight-1024.jpg The included ARB-L21-5000U 21700 Rechargeable Battery. (Must use a Single Port Charger 1 Amp/2 Amp at 10 Watts Max).

If you haven't treated yourself to a new flashlight in a while, the Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight is hands down my first choice. You can buy it directly from the Fenix site for $69 with free U.S. shipping. If you sign up for their newsletter, you'll get 20 percent off.

The Fenix E35 V3.0 EDC Flashlight receives a very high nimbleosity rating.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #803, Aug. 10, 2021. Today's theme is "I Left My Bag Behind." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It was about 8pm when I was standing in the Best Western parking lot somewhere off Interstate 5. I was staring into the cargo area of the car that contained two suitcases, a cooler, but no backpack. "Where the hell is it?" I said out loud. At the moment, I didn't know. This was the first night of a 4-day road trip. What happened next is the topic of today's TDS photography podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 803

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

I Left My Bag Behind

backpack-1024.jpeg

Here is the story of my leaving my backpack behind that contained my camera gear, laptop, iPad, AirPods, iPhone 12 Pro Max, and every other piece of tech gear I had packed except for the iPhone X that was in my pocket.

Inner Circle Perspective - How Do You View Instagram These Days?

  • 13 percent love Instagram and visit it daily or more.
  • 47 percent was once a big fan, but doesn't stop by as often these days.
  • 8 percent have given up Instagram completely.
  • 20 percent never used Instagram in the first place.
  • 12 percent say it's complicated, see my comment.

Some of those comments included:

"I visit daily but I wouldn't use the word "love". Can't love anything full of ads." - Thomas.

"I use the Grids application, on my Mac, which allows me to see my feed without any prioritization by the IG algorithm. This allows me to see actual photography from the people that I choose." - Dave.

"I was never a fan but tried to post regularly. It seemed like a place to put images, but the "likes" never appealed to me. I've grown tired of it and have neglected it for most of the last year and a half. I like Derrick's online community much better." -Henry

"I used to use it all the time when it was photography-focused, but now that it's mostly about branding and marketing, I spend a lot less time there than I used to. That said, I still post photos so that my older followers can see my new work." - Lawrence.

"I enjoyed posting on Instagram regularly in about 2014 and 2015 ... but the rise of "influencers" and TikTok type videos has killed the fun and meaningful use for me. Just another platform that doesn't meet my needs or wants.I'm in the process of going back to more regular use of Flickr because I find it more meaningful and interesting." -Del."

A Few Takeaways

The Facebook influence seems to really have dampened the party for many.

In my case, I still use it because I can quickly post a picture there, and have it propagate to Facebook and Twitter. That was a bit of a lifesaver on the recent trip where I forgot my gear.

That being said, I'm actually starting to feel like an old fogie on IG because I only post still pictures, not videos. Who would have ever dreamed photography would be an issue there?

You can learn more about the Inner Circle here.

New Training Course! Mobile Photography: Image Management

What do you do with the plethora of photos on your smartphone after taking them? It's easy to have hundreds, if not thousands, of photos in your library, but it isn't so easy to back up and keep track of them. In this course, get tips on how to manage your ever-growing mobile photography collection.

I delve into several different backup and organizational methods for both Android and iOS devices, highlighting the benefits and risks of each approach. Plus, I share tips for enhancing the appearance of your shots right on your mobile device.

Discover how to leverage your iPad as a mobile photography studio, transfer images from your digital camera to your mobile device, back up and edit photos with Lightroom, and much more.

Mobile Photography: Image Management is a course that practically anyone who enjoys photography on their smartphone would enjoy. Take a look and see what you think.

Peak Design Field Pouch v2 Review - Nimble and Nice

In use, it's a perfect size for a grab-and-go kit that you can keep close to your body and not attract attention. I have two basic configurations that I use it for. The first is a photography kit.

Photography Kit Configuration

Or, what I call a "get my work done while riding the train" kit.

Get Work Done Kit

In both configurations, the iPhone 12 Pro Max fits beautifully in the padded zippered pocket keeping it separate and protected from the other items in the bag.

What's appealing about all of this for me is that I have a very efficient carrying solution to bring along exactly what I need, but doesn't attract attention and can even be positioned under my jacket if necessary.

The Peak Design Field Pouch V2 has a few other tricks up its sleeve. It's expandable design allows you to configure it to just the size you need. You can carry it on your belt or use the supplied shoulder strap.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.) We have a new poll on the Patreon site for our members: Are You Looking to Buy a New Camera in 2021? Be sure to stop by and chime in.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have 40 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras - If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

Red River Paper - And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When I first looked at the catalog page for the Peak Field Pouch ($44.95), I thought that it might be too small to be useful. But I was intrigued by its handsome design and managed to get my hands on one for testing. I'm glad I did.

IMG_7695.jpeg

In use, it's a perfect size for a grab-and-go kit that you can keep close to your body and not attract attention. I have two basic configurations that I use it for. The first is a photography kit.

Photography Kit Configuration

Or, what I call a "get my work done while riding the train" kit.

Get Work Done Kit

In both configurations, the iPhone 12 Pro Max fits beautifully in the padded zippered pocket keeping it separate and protected from the other items in the bag.

IMG_7691.jpeg

The Field Pouch V2 can accommodate the iPad mini or one of my cameras, but not both. However, the iPhone 12 Pro max does work in either configuration.

What's appealing about all of this for me is that I have a very efficient carrying solution to bring along exactly what I need, but doesn't attract attention and can even be positioned under my jacket if necessary.

The Peak Design Field Pouch V2 has a few other tricks up its sleeve. It's expandable design allows you to configure it to just the size you need. You can carry it on your belt or use the supplied shoulder strap.

There's a full-length zippered inner pocket and various mini pouches for memory cards, batteries, business cards, etc. It includes two Capture Attachment Points if you want to carry a camera on the outside of the pouch (additional hardware required). And the design is top notch, as you would expect, using weatherproof 400D nylon canvas (made from recycled plastic).

You can use the pouch inside a larger bag as an organizer, or as a nimble field pouch with a camera or small tablet. Its handsome looks makes it an appropriate accessory for practically any situation.

Going back to my original question if this bag was too small to be practical, my opinion after a couple weeks of use is that it's not small; it's efficient. If you want a pouch that holds exactly what you need, and no more, take a look at the Peak Design Field Pouch V2. I give it a very high nimbleosity rating.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

What do you do with the plethora of photos on your smartphone after taking them? It's easy to have hundreds, if not thousands, of photos in your library, but it isn't so easy to back up and keep track of them. In this course, get tips on how to manage your ever-growing mobile photography collection.

Mobile-Photo-Backup-LinkedIn-1024.jpg Check out this free video, A few things about this course from Mobile Photography: Image Management by Derrick Story

I delve into several different backup and organizational methods for both Android and iOS devices, highlighting the benefits and risks of each approach. Plus, I share tips for enhancing the appearance of your shots right on your mobile device.

Discover how to leverage your iPad as a mobile photography studio, transfer images from your digital camera to your mobile device, back up and edit photos with Lightroom, and much more.

Mobile Photography: Image Management is a course that practically anyone who enjoys photography on their smartphone would enjoy. Take a look and see what you think.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #802, Aug. 3, 2021. Today's theme is "Camera Industry Fights Back." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

With a very positive recent report from Canon, and others holding their own in 2021, it's beginning to feel like a conservative rebound for the camera industry. On today's show, we'll take a closer look at the trends, then report numbers and comments from our own community regarding potential purchases in 2021. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 802

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

Camera Industry Fights Back

 Canon-R3-front.jpeg

The most promising imaging division report was just published by Canon, reporting Q2 financial results credit its EOS R5, R6 mirrorless cameras for 101% YoY net sales increase.

The data In its investor relations presentation shows Canon's consumer camera division pulled in 112.1B yen ($1B) in net camera sales--more than double its 55.7B yen ($500M) in sales in the same quarter last year. Granted, Q2 FY2020 was when COVID-19 was hitting much of the world the hardest, this recovery is even better than Canon expected.

This increase is also visible in Canon's operating profit. In Q2 FY2020, Canon's imaging business has an operating loss of 20.8B yen ($189M); in Q2 FY2021 it saw an operating profit of 20.9B yen ($190M).

Canon attributes this growth to strong sales of its EOS R5 and R6 mirrorless cameras and has raised its full-year outlook 'to reflect solid demand.' Canon specifically references its growing RF lens lineup, which it says will be the 'driver' of growth in its full-year outlook.

Stepping back and looking at a broader picture, 135 CIPA's February data shows 2021 is shaping up to be a year of stabilization for the camera industry.

The YoY numbers are some of the best we've seen in a while from CIPA and the data backs up what some of the major camera companies have emphasized over the past years in their interviews and financial result presentations for investors; the camera market is beginning to stabilize as the drop-off at the lower end of the market has more or less reached a plateau and hobbyist and professional photographers--who are less likely to trade out their dedicated cameras for smartphones--are starting to once again make up the majority of the market.

Considering March 2020 is when the COVID-19 pandemic really started to impact the global economy, contextualizing the rest of CIPA's 2021 data will prove to be more difficult. Specifically, we're going to see high YoY numbers for both production and shipments, due to both being limited in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but in future reports we'll do our best to contextualize CIPA's data to ensure we have a solid macro-level view of the photography market.

So I decided to check in with our Inner Circle Members to see what their sentiments were concerning purchases in the second half of 2021. I think you'll find their opinions interesting.

Inner Circle Perspective - Are You Thinking About a New Camera in 2021

  • 35 percent are considering a new mirrorless camera.
  • 40 percent say that their current gear is just fine.
  • 15 percent say that they are fine with their existing camera, but they are interested in a new lens.
  • 10 percent are eyeing a new smartphone with advanced camera features.
  • Zero percent are considering a new DSLR.

Some of the comments included:

"I own a few nice cameras and lenses and remind myself they are "good enough". If my iPhone X starts acting up, I won't hesitate to trade it in for an iPhone 12 Pro." - Scott.

"I love my D850 but really am interested in the Nikon Z6II to lighten my load." - Michael.

"I'm hoping for a new compact camera, to replace my LX100 II. I'm hopeful something comes out later this year." - Rohith.

"Interested in the Canon R3 for Friday night HS football and concerts." -Vic

"Unless Olympus does something irresistible camera-wise, I am awaiting the rumored new MacBooks with built-in SD card slots once again. That's probably where my $$ will go. I am lens-heavy at this so I don't "need" anything, but...well, you know. Lol" -Karen."

A Few Takeaways

The first thing that jumped out at me is No DSLR plans. Zero. Next, I'm impressed by Canon's rebound. And third, the Inner Circle comments remind just how diverse our gear list is. We need to balance everything from our cameras, to computers, to smartphones, plus software and subscription fees. It adds up.

In other words, there is a lot of competition for our disposable budget. I predict that 2021 will continue to be a relatively thrifty year for our audience.

2 New Openings for the Oregon Coast Workshop

Sometimes real life gets in the way of our fun, and that's been the case for two of our signed up members for the Oregon Coast Workshop.

The event runs from Nov. 9-12, with our HQ based in Florence, Oregon. I'm co-leading the event with Scott Davenport, and participation is limited to 10 photographers.

If you want to reserve a spot by placing a deposit, go to Our Workshop Page on TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Mastering Capture One Pro 21 Online Workshop

We have two seats open for Mastering Capture One Pro 21 Online Workshop that begins on Aug. 4, 2021.

We will cover best practices for using this app, plus all of the new tools and goodies that have been recently introduced. All of the sessions are recorded and made available to workshop participants.

Also, if you visit our TDS Workshops Page, you'll see a variety of topics including the new IR workshop.

And remember, Patreon Members get a $15 discount on this already affordable workshop.

466 Metadata from Olympic photographer's photos suggests the EOS R3 will have a 24MP sensor

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

Jeff Cable, a photographer covering the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, appears to have accidentally shared the sensor resolution of Canon's forthcoming EOS R3 mirrorless camera

To date, Canon has announced the EOS R3 is in development and even shown off the body of the camera, but it hasn't yet revealed what specifications we'll find from the hardware inside the camera. However, we might have at least one piece of the puzzle thanks to Cable, who has been testing out Canon's unreleased EOS R3 camera at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

On a blog where Cable is sharing his photos from his time covering the Olympics, he's uploaded a few images that still have that metadata attached. As spotted by members of Canon Rumors' forums, this metadata can be read by the Chrome plugin EXIF Viewer Pro, which shows at least some of the images were taken by a Canon EOS R3 camera and have a resolution of 6,000 pixels by 4,000 pixels -- the image size coming from a 24MP sensor.

This isn't necessarily confirmation Canon's EOS R3 mirrorless camera will have a 24MP sensor, but the data is there to see and appears to be legitimate so far as we can tell (we have been able to confirm the metadata in the images). DPReview has contacted Canon for a comment on the matter, but no response has been received as of the time of publishing this article.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.) We have a new poll on the Patreon site for our members: Are You Looking to Buy a New Camera in 2021? Be sure to stop by and chime in.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #801, July 27, 2021. Today's theme is "The 5 Photo Tips We Seem to Forget." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of the great things about hanging around other photographers, as I've been doing during the online workshops, is that they remind you of things that we sometimes forget. This latest batch comes complements of the Ultimate B&W Workshop that we just wrapped up on Saturday. I think you'll get a kick out of these. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 801

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

The 5 Photo Tips We Seem to Forget

I have this running joke with photography: If there are 10 things to remember for a successful picture, and I forget just one of them, I'm usually disappointed with the shot.

That doesn't leave us a very wide margin of error. These next five are perfect examples.

Sunflower-edit-1024.jpg

5 Things to Remember

  • Resetting the ISO to Auto after jacking it up to 6400.
  • Shading the front of my lens when shooting in the direction of the sun.
  • Remembering to shoot a little wide and crop to taste in post.
  • Acknowledging that it's not good enough just to carry an extra battery, but knowing that it must be recharged as well.
  • Not forgetting that B&W mode solves every color problem and can be a fix for harsh midday lighting as well.

2 Seats Open for Mastering Capture One Pro 21 Online Workshop

We have two seats open for Mastering Capture One Pro 21 Online Workshop that begins on Aug. 4, 2021.

We will cover best practices for using this app, plus all of the new tools and goodies that have been recently introduced. All of the sessions are recorded and made available to workshop participants.

Also, if you visit our TDS Workshops Page, you'll see a variety of topics including the new IR workshop.

And remember, Patreon Members get a $15 discount on this already affordable workshop.

Instagram's Shift in Focus Is a Reminder of the Risk in Building Businesses on Someone Else's Land

You can read the entire article here on FStoppers.

With the news that Instagram's focus has shifted to be far less centered around images, many photographers who have spent years building their following and brand on the app are left out in the cold. This isn't the first, nor will it be the last time you are reminded of the dangers of building a large part of your business on someone else's platform.

When Instagram launched a decade ago, it would have been difficult to predict that it would evolve into anything that wasn't centered around photographs. At first, I wasn't particularly interested in the app -- it seemed like a niche platform you could take photographs and put filters over the top of them, rather than something aimed at photographers -- but, I was eventually lured into trying it. It was restrictive (square crop only) but enjoyable, and the algorithms that dictated your success and views were intuitive. I became a little obsessed with getting more followers and more likes, which can be seen as a negative reaction, but its impact on my desire to create more and better images was positive at least.

Over the last few years, however, I have grown increasingly disillusioned with the app, to the point where I no longer post to it. Where once I was getting clients and growing analytics, a change from the chronological feed, followed by myriad other prescriptive alterations to who sees what meant it became frustrating and demotivating. I more or less gave up on using Instagram altogether, but that's because I didn't get particularly "big" to begin with. Photographers with six-figure (or more) followings could still harness it to make money and get unimaginable exposure. So, what's the problem?

Instagram has openly stated that they are moving away from photo sharing and photography, with a stronger focus on the more contemporary desires of social media users.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.) We have a new poll on the Patreon site for our members: Are You Looking to Buy a New Camera in 2021? Be sure to stop by and chime in.

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

How Online Workshops Have Changed

Looking back to 2019 and before, I realized that we didn't understand how to conduct an online workshop that was personal and interactive. But then again, we didn't really have to. That's what physical events were for.

Class-3-BW-Workshop-AM.jpg

All of that has changed.

Yesterday, I've just completed my 8th online event since the pandemic began. We've covered topics such as black and white photography, infrared, iPhone techniques, and more. As we were wrapping up class presentations, we talked about some of the benefits of this new approach. Many of the comments included:

  • The workshop was far more personal and interactive than anticipated. (We limit class size to 10 participants.)
  • Having more time to work on photo assignments allowed for more exploration of techniques. (Classes are once a week with time in-between to work on assignments.)
  • Not having to travel felt safer and more convenient. (Classes are on Zoom with full participation for everyone and augmented by an online site with open posting and commenting.)
  • The lower cost fit much better in the budget. ($155 for the entire class with lifelong community access, $140 for our Patreon Members.)
  • Having an online site to complement the live sessions enhanced the feeling of community. (A place to ask questions, share experiences, and get feedback on work.)

For many of the participants in our online events, this was their first workshop ever, in any format. The online approach felt like a more gentle way to dip one's toes in the water to see if this is an experience that was right for them.

One of the most difficult things for photographers and writers to find is a supportive community of like-minded artists. Our online workshops provide that, not only during the event itself, but long after it's over because of the online community we maintain for workshop participants.

Once you've attended a TDS Workshop, you're in the community. For life. And you know it's a quality place to share ideas and experiences because it's comprised of other artists who have participated in these events.

If you're thinking that you might enjoy an online or physical workshop for photography or writing, take a look at our workshops page. I think you will find the experience rewarding.

Things have really changed. And in this case, for the better.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #800, July 20, 2021. Today's theme is "Introduction to Infrared Photography." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Mysterious, wonderful, sometimes psychedelic, infrared photography can both marvel and baffle photographers at the same time. If you've been curious about IR, consider today's show an introduction to help you decide if this is the next new frontier for you. I hope you enjoy the show.

Digital Photography Podcast 800

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


podcast-icon.jpeg

Apple Podcasts -- Spotify Podcasts -- Stitcher

Podbean Podcasts -- Podbay FM -- Tune In

Before we get into the meat of today's show, I just have to say this: 800 episodes!

Introduction to Infrared Photography

The IR spectrum lives beyond how we normally view the world of visible light. But we can pull back the curtain and take a peek with our cameras and a simple IR filter. Once you do that however, you may get hooked. Infrared photography is one of the most fascinating explorations for visual artists.

After Lunch Walk.jpeg

I thought a good way to get us started is by leading a Q&A session. These questions have come up repeatedly during my IR workshops, and my guess is that many of them would be of interest to you as well.

Infrared Q&A

  • Do I need a special camera to make IR photos?
  • If I did want to get a modified camera for IR, what should I look for?
  • Why do the colors sometimes look so weird in IR photography?
  • Will my camera focus properly when capturing infrared?
  • What's the best software to process infrared photos?

Workshop Swap for September

I'm adding a Infrared Photography Workshop for Sept. 22, 2021, replacing the ON1 Effects event that was originally planned for that time slot.

If you visit our TDS Workshops Page, you'll see a variety of topics including the new IR workshop.

TTArtisan releases $150 7.5mm F2 fisheye APS-C lens for 7 camera mounts

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

TTartisans has released a new 7.5mm F2 fisheye lens for a long list of mirrorless camera systems.

The lens is constructed of 11 elements in eight groups, including two low-dispersion elements and three high-refractive index elements. It features a minimum focusing distance of 12.5cm (5"), uses a seven-blade aperture diaphragm and has an aperture range of F2 through F11. Due to the front element extending beyond the front of the lens, no filters can be used without third-party adapters.

The lens is available for Canon EOS-M, Canon RF, Fujifilm X, Leica L, Micro Four Thirds, Nikon Z and Sony E mount camera systems. However, due to it being an APS-C lens, full-frame cameras will need to be used in crop shooting mode or crop in in post-production to avoid a circle vignetting.

TTArtisan doesn't mention physical measurements, but does note the lens weighs between 343-370g (12-13oz), varying based on the lens mount version you choose. The TTArtisan 7.5mm F2 fisheye lens is available from TTArtisan's online shop for $149 in each of the aforementioned mounts. The first orders will ship out on July 21, 2021.

Nikon Says Z fc Shipments Will Be Slow, Delays 28mm f/2.8 Kit Indefinitely

You can read the entire article here on Petapixel.

Nikon has announced that while it intends to begin shipping Nikon Z fc cameras on schedule starting July 23, it does not have the supply to meet all demand. Additionally, overwhelming numbers of orders for the 28mm f/2.8 special edition kit have forced the company to delay it indefinitely.

The "Z fc 28mm f / 2.8 Special Edition Kit," which is scheduled to be released in late July 2021, has received a large number of reservations beyond expectations, and due to the delay in parts supply, the supply amount is sufficient for release. Is not expected to be available. Therefore, we have decided to postpone the release. We will inform you of the release date as soon as it is confirmed.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused to customers who are waiting for our products. We will do our utmost to deliver the product as soon as possible, and we appreciate your understanding.

A shortage of parts, likely caused by the global silicon shortage and the AKM factory fire last year, has resulted in extremely slow production from Nikon and other camera manufacturers over the last year. At the time, AKM factory leadership expected to be able to rebuild and restart production quickly, but the company was only able to start the recovery process in April of this year -- six months after the fire. It will be some time before AKM is able to return to its former manufacturing level. The lack of parts combined with Nikon shuffling its own factories has likely exacerbated the production issue for the camera company. Just like with AKM, it may be a while before Nikon is able to return to full manufacturing capacity.

Virtual Camera Club News

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Of all the features that I use on the iPhone 12 Pro Max, the ultra-wide camera is one of the most satisfying.

D-Story-SF-Giants.jpeg San Francisco Giants vs. the Washington Nationals at Oracle Park in San Francisco. iPhone 12 Pro Max using the ultra-wide camera. Photo by Derrick Story.

When you think about it as a traditional photographer, having access to a 13mm, f/2.4 lens with an expansive 180-degree field of view, in your pocket, is incredible.

I've always liked wide-angle photography, but didn't shoot as much of it as I would prefer because the lenses were bulky. So many times when I was putting together my nimble kit for the day, those optics were left behind.

All of that has changed. I can now carry a camera with just one prime lens (such as the Fujifilm X100V or Olympus PEN-F) with the iPhone 12 Pro Max in my pocket. The smartphone covers ultra-wide and mild telephoto, while the camera is used for my normal lens work.

The iPhone 12 Pro Max is my first phone with the wide optic, having upgraded from the iPhone X (which I love!), and I must say, that 13mm lens has changed everything.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.