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After months of pandemic isolation, I am way too familiar with every inch of real estate within a 5-mile radius of my house. And to be honest, it feels like I've taken every picture there is to take. That is, until I rediscovered infrared photography.

EMIR0074-R72-D-Story-1024.jpeg I've walked this path a 1000 times. But today I'm excited to be shooting here. Photo by Derrick Story with a 720 nm filter.

Now, when I take my walks with an Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III converted by Kolari Vision, my world looks brand new. And I'm excited to be taking pictures again.

"Infrared photography is a look into the invisible world. The human eye can see wavelengths from about 400nm-700nm (from purple to red); infrared is the light beyond 700nm. IR photography can be done with either infrared film, or a digital camera, and typically involves near infrared light in the 700nm to 1200nm range."

You can read an excellent introduction to IR on the Kolari Vision site. My experience is that you can "start simple" with a camera that you already have and a Hoya R-72 Infrared Filter. This is how I began, using a Fujifilm X20 digital camera that is relatively sensitive to IR light.

X20 Infrared 1 Fujifilm X20 camera with a Hoya R72 filter.

(You can test any digital camera by pointing an TV remote control at the lens in live view and seeing if a white dot appears on the LCD screen when you press any remote button.)

The advantages of the Hoya R-72 plus existing camera is the small investment. Depending on the diameter, you can usually buy the filter for around $50. The disadvantage is the filter is dense resulting on long shutter speeds for non-converted cameras. The good news is, if you move on to a full-spectrum converted camera, your R72 filter is even more useful on it.

If you catch the IR bug, and it is highly contagious, then chances are good that you will begin to explore the different types of camera conversions. You can go for a specific wavelength, such as a 720nm conversion, or get a full-spectrum conversion that makes all wavelengths available. You then simply add the appropriate filter to get the look you want.

FullSize-EMIR0025-IRchrome.jpeg The Kolari Vision IR Chrome lens filter on a full-spectrum Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III.

One of my favorites is the Kolari Vision IR Chrome lens filter that produces the look of Kodak Aerochrome IR film. I think the look is beautiful with its complementary color scheme. And I can use auto white balance and just shoot normally. But the results are anything but typical.

If you're looking for a creative way to survive the challenges of 2021, then I would seriously consider dabbling in infrared photography. I'm once again excited to take my morning walks, exploring what was once familiar territory that now looks like an entirely new world.

The Infrared Photography Workshop - Online March 2021

Do you feel like the world is looking like "the same old same old" through your camera's viewfinder? Have you felt your enthusiasm for photography waning as the pandemic wears on? Then it's time for you to consider exploring infrared imaging. This online event will reenergize your creativity and show you how to produce images that are unique and bursting with life.

You can learn more and sign up by visiting The Infrared Photography Workshop Page. Hope to see you there!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #773, Jan. 12, 2021. Today's theme is "Kingston's Workflow Station a Dream for Photographers." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

My annual pilgrimage to Las Vegas for the CES show was shortened to a stroll across the room where I watched the product unveilings on my computer. Fortunately some vendors had the foresight to send us samples ahead of the show, and my hands-down favorite so far is the Kingston Workflow Station they just announced. I'm now going to introduce it to you as well. I hope you enjoy the show.

Kingston's Workflow Station a Dream for Photographers

Kingston's Workflow Station and Readers give users the freedom to create and customize a file offload setup that fits their needs allowing them to transfer video, photos, and audio from multiple sources at once.

P1114857-Videoconference-Workstation.jpg

Whether on a 4K/8K multi-cam shoot with portable audio recorders or filming B-Roll with drones and GoPros, with the customizable Workflow Station Dock you can simultaneously connect the USB miniHub, SD or microSD readers that the shoot requires to transfer footage quickly. Workflow Readers can also be used standalone by connecting to a laptop via the included USB-C cable giving users the flexibility to have their workflow on-the-go.

Some of the highlights of this new device include:

  • Offload Files Quicker - Transfer video, photos, and audio from multiple sources at once.
  • Flexible Workflow System - Use only the hub and readers that fit your setup.
  • Portable Versatility Use the card readers on-the-go via their included USB-C.
  • Incredible Performance - Workflow Station products support USB 3.2 speeds which get you to editing quicker.

You'll need at least Windows 8 or macOS 10.10 for compatibility. I tested the dock with macOS Catalina, and it worked fantastic.

P1114858-Videoconference-Workstation.jpg

You can order the Kingston Workflow Station now for $135 that includes the Dock, a USB miniHub, power adapter, and cords. The SD Card Reader miniHub supports 2 UHS-II SD cards and can be used by itself or in the Dock, and is available for $36. Same price for the Micro SD card reader miniHub that also supports 2 UHS-II microSD cards.

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Exposure X6 software review: Faster than ever and even more capable

You can read the article here on DP Review.

Back in 2020, I reviewed Exposure Software's Exposure X5 and discovered much to love. A rival to the likes of Lightroom and Capture One, I found Exposure X5 to be blazingly fast and quite capable.

With a pretty affordable price tag and no subscription fees, it made for a very credible alternative to its more established rivals, especially for photographers on a budget. Now the follow-up, Exposure X6, is here, and I've tested all of its new features to see how they stack up.

  • Offers an equivalent to most of Lightroom's core features with no subscription and an affordable price tag.
  • Even better performance than its already-swift predecessor.
  • Loads of controls and a ton of quick-and-easy presets.
  • More auto controls get you in the ballpark quickly.
  • Noise reduction is now tuned to your camera model.
  • Less broad Raw support than its Adobe rival.

Available immediately, Exposure X6 can be purchased from Exposure Software for $129, which is an increase of $10 over the previous version. A free 30-day trial version can be obtained here. Those who purchased Exposure X5 after July 15, 2020 can upgrade for free, while earlier customers can upgrade for $89. A bundle including Exposure Software's Blow Up and Snap Art tools is priced at $149

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

More CES 2021 Coverage

The show is just getting started today, but by the end of this week we will know all of the photography-related announcements. I share my favorites on next week's podcast.

One that did leak out today was the Sony Airpeak Drone that can carry an Alpha camera. That sounds pretty fun!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There's been a vigorous discussion about the notion of substituting a modern iPhone (or other brand equivalent) for your bulging backpack, but not your favorite digital camera.

1600px-DSC_1821-tandem.jpg

I think this idea appeals to photographers for a few reasons.

  • We love digital cameras and want to use them.
  • Serious photographers rail at the idea of a smartphone world only.
  • Many of us want to travel as light as possible.
  • Smartphones make a great second camera.
  • Ultrawide smartphone lenses can substitute for optics in our bags.

I posted an article on Medium.com titled, Replace the Bag, not the Camera that outlines the details of this approach.

You may also want to listen to the podcast, Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It.

And finally, if you're interested in attending an online workshop that provides an hands-on experience with this concept, you can join a Wait List for "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photo Workflow".

This is nimble photography at its best!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Document, Even if You're Not There

Our smartphones are helpful for recording a variety of events. If we're treated to an attractively presented lunch, we can take a picture. If we're lucky enough to visit a family member we haven't seen in years, we can record the moment. And if an ugly lesson unfolds before our very eyes on the television screen, we can photograph that as well, especially if that event is a sobering reminder of how fragile our way of life has become.

IMG_7122.jpeg

In the article, Memories Fade, Photographs Don't, I put forth the idea that we can use our cameras to prevent us from rewriting difficult history as time fades our memories.

Important, sometimes tragic events can be documented even when we are not there in person. I think this is important to help keep recollections of events in proper focus.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #772, Jan. 5, 2021. Today's theme is "5 Ways to Create Beautiful B&W Photos." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Black and white photography is not merely the absence of color. In the right hands, monochrome pictures artistically blend shapes and tones to help us see life more clearly. We believe black and white photos are truthful even though the world is in color. The feeling is that we've stripped away all the distractions and are left with the essence of a subject. And on today's show I'm going to discuss 5 ways you can create beautiful B&W images.

5 Ways to Create Beautiful B&W Photos

When you really begin to explore B&W photography, you will probably notice that it reveals many aspects of the world clearer than color images. To help you with this exploration, here are five of my favorite methods for moving from color to monochrome.

before-after-1.jpg

  • The Desaturation Method - You can do this in practically any image editing app. Move the Saturation slider all the way to the left. Then fine tune the B&W with the Temperature and Tint sliders in White Balance. Finally, use your Exposure adjustments for the finishing touches.
  • Set Your Camera to Monochrome Mode - This has the added advantage of letting you compose in B&W, which is a whole different ballgame. Shoot in RAW+Jpeg. The Jpeg will be monochrome, and the RAW will be your color safety net.
  • Use Your Application's Built-In B&W Converter - Lightroom, Photos, Capture One Pro, Luminar, ACR, and Photoshop all have B&W conversion tools. Some are more sophisticated than others, but all work well.
  • Dedicated B&W App Such as Silver Efex Pro 2 - I find this approach the most creative because of the variety of presets combined with the power of the tools.
  • Shoot B&W Film - This approach can be a real eye-opener if you've never dabbled in analog photography before. Black and white films such as Kodak Tribute-X, Ilford HP5 400 Plus, and Fujifilm's Neopan 100 Acros II are amazing emulsions that provide rich tonality.

Regardless of the method you use, working in Black and White will likely invigorate your photography and help you see the world in a new way.

Waiting List for a Second Session of Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow Online Workshop

The first session of "Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow" Online Workshop has sold out. But I've created a wait list for a second session that would begin in mid-February. If we get enough interest for a second session, I will open registration for it.

If you're interested in attending, just go to The Nimble Photographer and click on Workshops. There's no charge to get on the wait list.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Gone but not forgotten: Adobe Flash is no more

You can read the article here on DP Review.

Adobe Flash, a staple of the internet for much of its nearly 25-year life, is officially dead. Adobe promised that its support for Flash Player would end on December 31, 2020. True to its word, Flash has ridden off into the proverbial sunset.

Beginning January 12, 2021, Adobe will block Flash content from running Flash Player. Furthermore, Adobe 'strongly recommends' all users immediately uninstall Flash Player 'to help protect their systems.' Adobe will no longer be issuing security updates for Flash Player, making it important to remove from your system. For information on how to uninstall Flash Player, refer to this Adobe support page.

The move has to sunset Adobe Flash has been a long time coming, as Adobe first announced its intention to discontinue Flash back in 2017 after asking developers to move on to HTML5 in 2015. By 2018, a very small proportion of websites still used Flash, with many opting instead to use Javascript, WebGL or HTML5.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of the few bright spots in 2020 was the debut of the Fujifilm X100V APS-C digital camera. In a year of excellent releases from Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, Olympus, and Sony, the X100V is the camera that I carry in my backpack and reach for in most situations.

P8054220.jpeg

Its specs are impressive, but this camera's appeal transcends its data sheet. At the top of the list is how I feel with it in my hands, ready to shoot. The only camera that rivals this affection for me is the Olympus PEN-F, and earlier camera of the year that I still use frequently. Both the PEN-F and the X100V make me want to take pictures. I search for subjects just to have the joy of shooting with them.

Creatively speaking, the film simulations in the X100V combined with the tilting LCD and optical/electronic viewfinder allow me to see the world in unique colors and tones that are far more exciting than the typical digital image. Whether it's a snapshot of a family member, a moment on the streets, or a stunning Sonoma County landscape, I feel like an artist every time I press the shutter button.

Fujifilm-X100V-Thumbs-1600.jpg

And then when I sit down at the computer to browse and edit the files in Capture One Pro, I am delighted by the image quality this camera produces. The Jpegs are beautiful and the RAWs are infinitely editable. Whether I'm at f/2.0 or f/11, ISO 200 or 3200, I'm pleased with what I see.

The X100V is the camera that I've used to document the pandemic in L.A. and S.F. It's the camera that I grab when I jump out of the car to capture something beautiful. And I feel absolutely comfortable with the Fujifilm when I'm out on the street.

My Honorable Mentions for 2020 are the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III and the Nikon Z5 with its cool 24-50mm pancake zoom lens. I very much enjoyed testing both of those, along with the latest from Canon and Panasonic. But at the end of the day, the Fujifilm X100V is the camera that I own and use daily. And it is my pick for top camera of 2020.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #771, Dec. 29, 2020. Today's theme is "Speed Editing in Capture One Pro 21." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When I first looked at the description for Speed Edit in Capture One Pro 21, I thought, "Meh, looks OK. Nothing fancy, no AI, just an interface tweak." Boy, was I wrong. After my first 10 minutes of practice, I'm relabeling Speed Edit as truly clever and useful. I'll explain why on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Speed Editing in Capture One Pro 21

speed-edit-1600.jpg

There are a number of other improvements in C1P 21, such as Dehaze, but I want to start with Speed Edit because it is the most impactful.

What Capture One has done is establish single-press keystrokes for primary adjustments that we most commonly use. What's clever about the approach is that a mini adjustment slider appears at the bottom of the picture that you and move via the mouse, trackpad, or arrow keys. And you don't have to have any of the editing tabs open to use this.

There are 14 edits that you can access via this method. They include: Exposure, Brightness, Contrast, Saturation, Highlight, Shadow, Black White, Kelvin, Tint, Clarity, RGB Highlight, RGB Shadow, and RGB Midtone. The control keys are on the left side of the keyboard, leaving your right hand free to mouse or use the arrow keys.

And yes, you can edit more quickly using this method.

Other notable features in this release include:

  • Dehaze - Eliminate haze and reduce flatness in your images - all in one slider. The powerful new Dehaze tool automatically adjusts contrast, saturation and other elements in flat photos.
  • HEIC - With support for HEIC files (8-bit), you can now edit photos from your Apple devices and more in Capture One.
  • Learn Button - It's never been easier to master Capture One. With the new "Learn" button, you'll quickly access a curated selection of tutorials designed to help you learn step-by-step. Plus, enable "Tool Tips" and hover over a tool for a quick explanation of how it works.
  • Faster Asset Management - It's now faster than ever to search and browse photos in Catalogs and Sessions. And with new high-resolution thumbnails, it's also easier to select and cull images before you even import. Plus, you can now import photos from different folders at once.
  • Solid Apple ProRAW Support - I edited ProRAW files from an iPhone 12 Pro Max, and they looked fantastic in C1P 21.

Upgrading

Most users can upgrade from C1P 20 for $159 for perpetual license or for $126 annual subscription.

Annual Inner Circle Memberships Now Available

I now have an option with Patreon to offer a full year membership to the Inner Circle. Plus, you will save 10 percent! So if you've been holding off joining us because you don't want monthly charges on your card, just select the new option on the Inner Circle Signup Page.

This Free App Lists Recipes for Over 100 Fujifilm Film Simulations

You can read the article here on Petapixel.com

The creator of the Fuji X Weekly blog has published his giant library of film simulation recipes to an easy-to-use app. The Fuji X Weekly app has over 100 recipes and more will be added regularly.

Fuji X Weekly is a blog created by photographer Ritchie Roesch who has been publishing a multitude of film simulation recipes to his blog for some time, categorized by which are compatible with specific Fujifilm sensors. The Fuji X Weekly app is a mobile library of those and other film simulation recipes that can be easily used in the field.

The app itself is free and immediately gives you access to a large list of recipes to try out. The recipes are designed to be leveraged using the custom preset option found in most Fujifilm cameras. While some cameras only allow for one custom preset at a time, some do allow for multiple. The app is designed to make it easier to find and save presets that you like and make it easier to adjust them in the field, which is especially helpful if your Fujifilm camera severely limits the number of presets you can save at a time.

New Workshop! Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow

We have 2 seats left!

There's been a lot of discussion about how contemporary iPhones will replace digital cameras. But in practice, they are better for augmenting your image capabilities rather than serving as your sole capture device. And now with Apple ProRAW and iPhone 12 Pro, this becomes more true than ever.

This workshop is designed to help you best integrate your modern iPhone into a professional photography workflow. Because of its compact size and powerful features, it can replace many bulky accessories that we were once required to carry along.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Photo assignments and weekly check-ins begin in early February 2021, with the grand finale final day on Feb. 27, 2021.

As part of this workshop you will have access to Derrick Story Online, our virtual headquarters where we compare notes, share pictures, and learn new techniques.

I'll hope you'll join me for this exciting event. Only 10 seats available. First come, first served.

You can register now for $135. Patreon members receive a $15 discount for this event.

Recommended Hardware for this workshop: iPhone X or newer. Mac running macOS Catalina or Big Sur.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #770, Dec. 22, 2020. Today's theme is "Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

There's been so much talk about how smartphones will replace our digital cameras. But I think for nimble photographers, that's the wrong approach. Instead, let's explore how we can use smartphones with our digital cameras instead of replacing them. I'll share one scenario today with a Fujifilm X100V and iPhone 12 Pro Max. I hope you enjoy the show.

Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It

1024-DSC_1821-tandem.jpg

There are certainly situations when I want a digital camera with all its tools and conveniences, and other situations when my smartphone will work just fine. But to tell you the truth - the best scenario is having them both with me.

Digital Camera Benefits

Let's start with a list of benefits for digital cameras.

  • Digital cameras typically have great viewfinders that are superior in many situations.
  • Camera companies have years of color technology under their belt that we can take advantage of, such as Fuji's film simulations.
  • Larger sensors make it easier to control depth of field.
  • It's nice not to have your photo shoot interrupted by a text message or phone call.
  • Digital cameras provide more megapixels and larger photo sites.
  • Many digital cameras are quite beautiful and are inspiring to use, such as my Olympus PEN-F and Fujifilm X100V.
  • The option of interchangeable lenses help us meet a variety of photo opportunities.

Smartphone Benefits

Smartphones do have their advantages as well.

  • Smartphones are ultra compact, and we typically have one in our pocket at all times.
  • Smartphones tend to be more adept at computational photography helping us overcome common technical challenges.
  • Cellular and WiFi connectivity are wildly useful.
  • Mobile imaging apps are quite powerful and have become more useful as screens have grown larger.
  • Smartphone are ubiquitous and don't attract unwanted attention in sensitive situations.
  • Smartphones can house up to three prime lenses in a single device making them quite versatile.
  • Smartphones can provide instant cloud backup of our images.

Benefits of Using Them Together

So, if we combine one well-specified smartphone with a favorite nimble camera, what are the benefits?

  • You don't have to carry extra lenses and accessories. My iPhone 12 Pro Max has, for example, 26mm f/1.6 prime, 65mm f/2.4 telephoto, and a 13mm f/2.4 ultra wide. Combine that with the 35mm f/2.0 prime on my X100V or 34mm f/1.8 prime on the PEN-F, and I have a full kit.
  • I can process and upload images from anywhere. Connecting the iPhone with the X100V gives me a powerful workstation in the field.
  • Smartphone are infinitely versatile thanks to software that's immediately downloadable.
  • When you think about it, smartphones are high value purchases compared to comparable cameras. My iPhone 12 Pro Max and Fujifilm X100V costs about the same. And I have a complete camera kit for $2,800.
  • Smartphones allow me to shoot with cameras that I love, despite their shortcomings because the iPhone fills in the functionality gaps.
  • Digital cameras give me high resolution and smartphones provide broad versatility.

Now, when I walk out the door, I can configure my digital camera the way that I want (monochrome mode, portrait lens, etc.) knowing that if I encounter a situation that it doesn't work for, I have my iPhone 12 Pro Max to fall back on. Indeed, this is a dynamic duo that I would not want to split up.

New Workshop! Integrating iPhone into a Pro Photography Workflow

There's been a lot of discussion about how contemporary iPhones will replace digital cameras. But in practice, they are better for augmenting your image capabilities rather than serving as your sole capture device. And now with Apple ProRAW and iPhone 12 Pro, this becomes more true than ever.

This workshop is designed to help you best integrate your modern iPhone into a professional photography workflow. Because of its compact size and powerful features, it can replace many bulky accessories that we were once required to carry along.

In this workshop you will explore:

  • Working with just one digital camera and an iPhone.
  • Taking advantage of a versatile fast prime lens on your digital camera and using iPhone for additional focal lengths.
  • Perfecting a RAW workflow with the iPhone.
  • Leveraging Apple ProRAW for those who have iPhone 12 Pro.
  • Building a kit that allows you to travel lighter without compromising capability.
  • Post processing tips and techniques using Photos on Mac, iPad, and iPhone.
  • Investigating other software and workflows to augment your imaging prowess.

Photo assignments and weekly check-ins begin in early February 2021, with the grand finale final day on Feb. 27, 2021.

As part of this workshop you will have access to Derrick Story Online, our virtual headquarters where we compare notes, share pictures, and learn new techniques.

I'll hope you'll join me for this exciting event. Only 10 seats available. First come, first served.

You can register now for $135. Patreon members receive a $15 discount for this event.

Recommended Hardware for this workshop: iPhone X or newer. Mac running macOS Catalina or Big Sur.

Tips for Shooting Holiday Lights with iPhone

You can read the entire article here on Petapixel.com.

Here's how the article starts:

The holidays in New York City are my favorite part of the year. It's such a magical and festive time all throughout the City. You'll find holiday trees, light displays, and the prettiest decorations around every corner.

It's such a joy to take photos in New York City during that time, and I'm excited to share with you some of my favorite tips for capturing beautiful and creative photos of holiday decorations. The best part is you don't need fancy, heavy, or expensive photo gear. Just take out your iPhone and start snapping.

Whether you're a professional photographer or just someone who loves taking photos, I've found that my iPhone 12 Pro Max offers that versatility to meet you at whatever level you're at.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capturing in B&W Has its Advantages

A lot of photographers tell me they don't need to shoot in B&W because they'll just convert the images later on in post. And yes, there's nothing wrong with that.

But why not have your cake and eat it too? If you capture in monochrome using RAW+Jpeg, you can reap the advantages of seeing and composing the images in B&W, and still have all of your options open in post. The Jpeg version will be processed in-camera according to your settings, and the RAW will remain untouched until you edit it later on the computer.

Here's an example of this technique using my Fujifilm X100V in film simulation mode.

monochrome-DSCF2261-BW.jpg Film simulation was ACROS + G filter. Further refined in Capture One Pro. Photos by Derrick Story.

color-DSCF2261-BW.jpg RAW file revealed in color.

My goal for the day was to come home a handful of black & white images for my Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop that I'm currently facilitating. Had I been shooting in color, I may not have pressed the shutter button.

The trunk of the car is so ugly in the color shot, I probably would have just let it drive by. But in monochrome, it isn't nearly as distracting. And in fact, I like the B&W image.

If you're goal is to end up with black and white photos, then I recommend capturing that way as well. By doing so, you will be better able to preview the shots and create stronger compositions. Plus, you might not let a car get away that you would have otherwise passed on.

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #769, Dec. 15, 2020. Today's theme is "What to Do About All of Those Digital Photos?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Our digital photos pile up faster than leaves in Autumn. And today's show is dedicated to getting them bagged up and organized. We're going to rake up this job from two angles, using common sense organizing techniques and a dash of artificial intelligence. So glad you're here!

What to Do About All of Those Digital Photos?

dec-2013.jpg

We're going to start out today talking with Isabelle Dervaux, a professional photo organizer.

Isabelle shares some great ideas and advice to help you get your arms around all those images on your hard drive. She's also available to you for a free 20 minute phone consultation.

One of her favorite quotes:

"Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop." - Ansel Adams.

And finally, you may want to follow her on Instagram.

CullAi Is a Free/Affordable AI Organizing Tool for Mac Photographers

I ran across this article, CullAi is a Free Artificial Intelligence Culling Tool for the Mac, and was quite interested in this software.

So I downloaded the app and began testing it. You can use it for free with 50 photos or less per run. But I wanted to see how it performed on a professional shoot, so I ponied up the $10 for unlimited processing and put it to work.

The bottom line is, this app is super helpful for large collections of images of people. That's its focus. And it works surprisingly well. I discuss my experience on the second segment of today's show.

You can download CullAi from the Mac App Store.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.