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Apple's AirPods are handy for more than listening to your favorite podcast on your iPhone. They can be useful tools when connecting with others on your Mac via Zoom, Skype, and other video conferencing platforms.

airpods.jpg

When using your AirPods instead of the built-in mic on your computer, you can improve sound quality of your voice while at the same time providing more mobility for moving around. They can be particularly handy when you don't want to be constrained by headphone wires or don't want to mess with finding an audio interface for your computer to use a regular mic.

If this sounds appealing to you, here are some tips for configuring and getting the most from your AirPods.

Connecting to Your Mac

Start by putting the AirPods in your ears, then going to System Preferences > Bluetooth on your Mac. If you haven't done so already, check the box "Show Bluetooth in the menu bar." This will make things easier in everyday use.

Now click on the Bluetooth icon in the menu bar and tap on Connect for the AirPods. Your Mac should respond fairly quickly with the pairing. If there is a hangup, I would recommend going to the device that you last used the AirPods with, most likely your phone, and disconnecting from it. Then return to your Mac, and the pairing should go smoothly.

connect-airpods.jpeg Connecting AirPods to your Mac.

Once the pairing has been made, tap on the Option button and refer to the illustration below. Then click Done.

configure-airpods.jpeg Configure your AirPods like this.

You can test your configuration using a simple app such as Voice Memos that's included with your Mac. Then, before you use your AirPods on your next video conference call, be sure to check the settings for that platform to make sure they are the audio device being used. For example, here are the settings for Skype.

check-your-setting.jpg Checking the settings on Skype (or whatever platform that you are using).

Doubling Your Performance

One of the few downsides to using AirPods for video conferencing is their battery life. If you're on a particularly long call, you may hear the familiar battery warning beep. You can check the battery level by clicking on the Bluetooth icon in the menu bar.

But keep in mind that you only really need one AirPod at a time. So I recommend starting with one, using it for a while, then putting the other one in your other ear, remove the first AirPod and return it to the case for charging.

You can do this in realtime during the call without ever missing a beat. And unless you're working a telethon, you should have plenty of juice to complete the meeting, even a long one.

Once you're finished with the session, I would go back to the Bluetooth icon and Disconnect your AirPods from your Mac. This leaves them ready to connect to another device.

disconnect-airpods.jpeg Disconnecting your AirPods.

Final Thoughts

Wireless Bluetooth earbuds are incredibly handy devices for remote work and connecting with others online. They bypass the need for a separate audio interface, they are portable, and in most cases, they sound better than the built-in mic on you Mac.

Pair them up and take them for an online spin. I think you'll like what you hear.

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #739, May 19, 2020. Today's theme is "New Capture One Pro, and More!." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Capture One Pro continues to roll with its latest release that features new tools, RAW support (including E-M1 Mark III), lens profiles, and a discounted version for Nikon users. Plus, here's a way to put your skills to use to help small businesses in your community. All of this, and more, on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

New Capture One Pro 20.1

So much to cover with this pt.1 release of Capture One Pro 20. First of all, it's free for current licensed users of 20. I'll start with the new features, then get into RAW support, and wrap up with the new Nikon version of the app.

C1P20-BeforeAfter-Master.jpg

New Features!

  • Heal and Clone
  • Before/After feature - Two styles to choose from.
  • New activation and onboarding flow
  • Nikon profiles - The profiles available in Nikon Picture Controls are now replicated within Capture One for selected camera models. These profiles are available from the ICC Profile menu within Base Characteristics. They provide the same tone curve and color corrections known from the built-in Nikon JPG files as a starting point for your raw file. (compatible with RAW files from: D6, D5, D850, D810/D810A, D800, D780, D750, D610, Z7, Z6, D500, D7500, D5600, D5500, D3500, D3400, D3300, Z50).

New RAW Support

Canon 250D
Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II
Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III
Nikon P950
Leica M10 Monochrome
Olympus E-M1 Mark III
Phase One iXH-150
Zeiss ZX (which isn't even out yet, but has a B&H catalog page)

New Nikon Version

Get all the editing tools to you need to make your Nikon images look their best. And for selected camera models, apply built-in Nikon profiles that match the colors in your camera.

More than 75 Nikon cameras supported.

You can get Express for $99 a year via subscription or for $129 for perpetual license (compared to $278 for the Pro version that supports all cameras.) There are a few features omitted from Express, such as layers.

Improved Lightroom importer

New functionality in the Lightroom importer opens up for a better transition experience. It is now clearer what will happen and what you can expect when importing your Lightroom catalog into Capture One.

It is now possible to import offline images (Smart Previews in Lightroom) and have them automatically sync up once the original files become online again, for example when an external drive containing these images is reconnected. Files that failed to import will be compiled in a list to handle after the import is complete. This list will include files from unsupported cameras or file formats that are not supported in Capture One.

Learn Capture One Pro 20 in Just 2 Hours

You can master Capture One Pro 20 with my latest online class, Capture One Pro 20 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning, or, if you're a lynda.com subscriber, you can watch it there as well.

Help Your Local Businesses with Photography and Social

Over the last two months, many shops and restaurants have been adapting to changes resulting from the pandemic. Part of the challenge, at least in my area, has been letting potential customers know they are open and how they are operating. I think this is something we can help with.

I was thinking that photographers and storytellers could serve as "ant scouts" to find these local establishments, photograph them, then share their stories on social media. By using the hashtag #open4pickup - people who follow us, or search via the hashtag could see the faces and places of these businesses who are adapting to these crazy circumstances.

We could also offer ideas to help keep everyone safe in the process, such as ordering ahead of time and paying with a credit card (including tip), wearing a face covering when picking up your purchase (even if you're staying in the car) and washing your hands throughly once your return home.

My personal plan is to research and visit a new local establishment once a week. I'll ask them if it's OK to take the picture and share it online. And I'm recording geotags at the same time using either my iPhone or my Fujifilm X100V, which also can record location. That way people can easily find the business when they see your post.

As I small business owner myself, I'm really pulling for the other shops and restaurants in my hometown. I'm hoping you will consider this idea as well - #open4pickup.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Over the last two months, many shops and restaurants have been adapting to changes resulting from the pandemic. Part of the challenge, at least in my area, has been letting potential customers know they are open and how they are operating. I think this is something we can help with.

DSCF1596-Cibo-D-Story-1024.jpg Alanah was managing curbside pickup for CIBO in Santa Rosa, CA. They are serving their full menu daily. #open4pickup

I was thinking that photographers and storytellers could serve as "ant scouts" to find these local establishments, photograph them, then share their stories on social media. By using the hashtag #open4pickup - people who follow us, or search via the hashtag could see the faces and places of these businesses who are adapting to these crazy circumstances.

We could also offer ideas to help keep everyone safe in the process, such as ordering ahead of time and paying with a credit card (including tip), wearing a face covering when picking up your purchase (even if you're staying in the car) and washing your hands throughly once your return home.

My personal plan is to research and visit a new local establishment once a week. I'll ask them if it's OK to take the picture and share it online. And I'm recording geotags at the same time using either my iPhone or my Fujifilm X100V, which also can record location. That way people can easily find the business when they see your post.

As I small business owner myself, I'm really pulling for the other shops and restaurants in my hometown. I'm hoping you will consider this idea as well - #open4pickup.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #738, May 12, 2020. Today's theme is "Thriving in the New Normal." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A big part of our well being is the health of our artistic pursuits. Beyond finding ways to put food on the table and ensuring shelter overhead, the question lingers, "There's got to be more to life than this." Those of us who love photography know that it's changing. Big conferences and classes are going away. Physical workshops are being challenged. And even flying to a pretty place is looking pretty sketch these days. Welcome to the new normal. And here's how we're going to make it work to our advantage.

Thriving in the New Normal

Communication is a key to adjusting to changes in a relationship. If your wife has to leave for a long business trip, then figuring out how to maintain the connection should be part of the plan. It's easy when you can see each other daily. Distance makes things more difficult. Figure out a plan.

the-new-normal-1024.jpg

Many of us are feeling a distance between our art and our daily lives. In my case, I'm not spending time with other photographers, I'm not traveling, and I'm not being hired to take pictures. Your particular variables might be a bit different, but I bet you have many of the same feelings.

So, what do we do? Here are five ideas that I think will help us move forward the new normal as photographers.

Five Possible Ways to Thrive in Pandemic Life

  • More Self Assignments - Just because we don't have the physical freedom that we once enjoyed, that doesn't mean the we're confined creatively. We can explore how to stir those embers by creating self-assignments and seeing them through. If we're successful, we'll enjoy both the fruits of our efforts and a level of self-satisfaction for the accomplishment.
  • Branch Out into Different Types of Photography - When I was working with Skylum, over 80 percent of our customers focused on landscape photography. But there are so many other disciplines within the craft. For example: night photography, close up photography, microscope photography, still lives, and on and on.
  • Improve Post Processing Skills - This is an area that practically every photography can get better doing.
  • Explore Movie Making - Our cameras are fantastic video recording devices. But many photographers don't really explore their movie making capabilities.
  • Join Online Courses - If your embrace a new endeavor, then you probably want to learn more about the tools required to do it. For example, learning movie making might involve finally learning Final Cut X as well. Online courses are perfect for software attaining software knowledge.

I think the earlier that we accept that things have changed, and in some ways forever, the sooner we can start to move into the new spaces that will satisfy us creativity. And to be honest, I don't have time to sit around and hope that the things I miss return. Do you?

And when we can have some of those things back, whenever that is. I will be happy. But I will also bring a new set of skills to the table to augment the things I loved before. Who knows, I may even find a new favorite thing that I never acknowledged before.

This is truly a chance to grow. I say, let's start right now.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Adobe's 12th Annual 99U Creative Conference will be free and virtual this year

You can read the story on DP Review..

Adobe has announced its 12th Annual 99U Creative Conference, which is usually a paid, in-person event, will be hosted on Adobe Live for free as a virtual event this year amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Tickets for the annual event normally cost around $1,000, so being able to take in the event for free, in the comfort of your own home, is quite the discount. This year's event will take place on Wednesday June 17 and will feature a mix of keynotes, creative workshops and masterclasses throughout the day. The presentations will be available stream via Adobe Live or available on-demand shortly after completion of each event.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $45. It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

In the latest movie from Digitizing Family Memories, I show viewers how to use their digital cameras to create high resolution files from slides and negatives.

DFM-Class-4-Digitizer-1024.jpg

Most hobbyist photographers have some sort of close-up lens, so that isn't a big challenge. The harder part, in my opinion, is the diffused light source. And I think the easiest way to go is with a LED edge light.

For my home setup, I'm using the FotodioX C-200RS FlapJack 7" LED Bi-Color Edge Light. It's easy to set up, has a wonderfully even light source, and I can even adjust the color temperature if necessary.

DFM-Class-4-Light.jpg

To help tame the light shining into the lens of the camera, I fashioned a slide holder out of black cardboard. I cut a square out of the center, placed the slide in the opening, and let the camera base the exposure solely on the illuminated film. Plus, it's easier on my eyes as well.

Slide-Mask-DFM-Class-4.jpg

The Flapjack has a built-in diffuser panel. So that eliminates a lot of the work. It also has a standard tripod socket, so you can mount it just about anywhere, for practically any configuration. And the results are terrific.

DIY-Scan-Digitizer-Scotland.jpg

Here's an un-retouched copy of a Kodachrome slide that I captured in Scotland in 1992. The LED light setup make the process easy. Just turn on the light, place the slide on the surface, and take the picture.

Not having to mess with electronic flash and cumbersome light boxes truly made the task at hand more enjoyable. If you're thinking about setting up your own digitizing station, I would consider a LED edge light for your illumination. It's a sweet way to go.

Digitizing Family Memories Online Course Now Available

Have you procrastinated long enough organizing that shoe box full of family snapshots, negatives, and slides? At first, the task of digitizing and cataloging all those analog shots can feel daunting. But I've designed an online course that will walk you step by step though a manageable process that is both efficient and fun.

And the best part is, you can start today! Digitizing Family Memories is available online now. It includes 4 30-minute instructional movies, class notes and schedule, and gives you access to a community of hobbyist photographers working on the same project.

Sign up today, and take control of those valuable memories.

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #737, May 5, 2020. Today's theme is "Has ON1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

ON1 360 joins the ranks of Adobe and Apple for offering a connected desktop to mobile experience with tons of features and editing tools. On the surface, ON1 makes a very good argument. We'll dig a bit deeper on today's TDS podcast to determine if this is a service that you should seriously consider. I hope you enjoy the show.

Has On1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?

Starting this June, you can subscribe to a complete photo capture, management, editing, sharing system that works on macOS, Windows, iOS, and Android devices. It's called ON1 360, and there's much to unpack.

ON1-360.jpg

ON1 360 automatically keeps track of the photos you choose to access from any of your devices, including their metadata and where you want to store them. The desktop and mobile apps share the same processing engine, which enables non-destructive editing settings to remain in sync as well.

An Overview of the Features

  • All the Powerful Editing Features of Photo RAW - built-in effects, portrait retouching, and layers.
  • Choose Which Photos to Sync Between Devices - Somewhat similar to Lightroom Desktop where you can manage your Cloud storage needs by choosing which images are shared across devices. Regardless, your original files stay in their original locations.
  • Impressive Compression Option - store smaller files (4x smaller, high-quality) OR the full raw files and sync in multiple directions
  • One License for 5 Desktop and 5 Mobile Devices - This provides more flexibility than Adobe's plan that only allows for 2 desktop devices.
  • Flexible Pricing Plan You can buy a perpetual license for Photo RAW or rent it as a subscription option. The first offering lays out two plans, one for 20 GBs of Cloud storage, and the other for 1 TB of space. Pricing depends if you include renting the software or not.

ON1 pulls off this magic by creating a temporary version of the photo under-the-hood (similar to a compressed raw file) and storing in the Cloud. The photo maintains the tone and color of the original photo while using only about 25 percent of the Cloud storage space a typical raw photo uses. For those who demand the full raw file at all times and don't care about storage space, uploading and editing the raw photo is also an available option.

Your original photo files stay put, right where you keep them. Your original photos can live on any of your devices, including external hard drives and file servers. You can choose to upload copies of your original photos to ON1 360? as well, if you need to access the full, original file remotely.

How Much Does it Cost?

If you buy your own copy of Photo RAW for $50, then you can get the 200 GB plan for $60 a year, or 1 TB for $110 a year. Those plans include the mobile app. Preorder now, and you won't be billed again until July 2021. If you decide to rent Photo RAW, the 200 GB plan for $90 a year, or 1 TB for $180 a year.

If you decide to rent Photo RAW, the 200 GB plan for $90 a year, or 1 TB for $180 a year.

Who Is It For?

This could be appealing to photographers who don't have a Cloud-connected workflow and want one. Capture One Pro, Luminar, and DxO are great on the desktop, but they're not available on mobile devices. Also, artists who are not satisfied with their current situation, whether it be Creative Cloud or iCloud, may see ON1 as a better end-to-end solution.

The Bottom Line

If you're happy with your current workflow, I don't recommend the switch to ON1 360. But if you've wanted a connected photo experience and don't have one currently, I think it stacks up well against Creative Cloud and Photos for macOS.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

New MacBook Pro 13" Looks Great for Photographers

Apple announced today their new 13" MacBook Pro, and it looks pretty darn good.

Highlights include: the Magic Keyboard with a redesigned scissor mechanism, a 13.3" Retina Display, immersive stereo speakers, and all-day battery life. The Touch Bar adapts to different apps to provide useful functions without having to navigate menus. It features a Retina-quality display and supports multi-touch input. The power button contains the Touch ID sensor, so you can quickly log into your MacBook Pro using your fingerprint. You can also use Touch ID to make purchases over the web, thanks to Apple Pay.

The model I like for $1,499 is powered by a 1.4 GHz 8th Gen Intel Core i5 Quad-Core processor that features a burst speed of up to 3.9 GHz, while 8GB of 2133 MHz LPDDR3 onboard RAM helps to ensure smooth multitasking and also allows the computer to quickly access frequently used files and programs. The system memory cannot be upgraded.

For long-term storage of your files, this MacBook Pro is equipped with a 512GB SSD. If you want to add external peripherals, 2 Thunderbolt 3 ports support bi-directional transfer speeds of up to 40 Gb/s, while also supporting 10 Gb/s USB 3.1 and device charging. Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) is built-in for wireless networking, and Bluetooth 5.0 technology will allow you to connect additional compatible peripherals. There is a FaceTime HD webcam.

You can preorder the 13" MacBook Pro today for $1,499.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes in the course will outline a specific set of steps that you have one week to accomplish. Then, the next week, we build on that progress with new techniques and assignments. By the end of the four weeks, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

Patreon members can sign up for free on the Patreon site. I have a post there for you. All you have to do is comment that you want to join us. If you're not a Patreon member, you can sign up at the Inner Circle level for $5 a month and become instantly eligible for the course.

Non-Patreon members can also sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $45.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

External solid state drives were once relegated as travel companions. But now, thanks to their larger capacity and impressive speed, I find myself relying on them more for everyday work. Such has been the case with the Crucial 1TB X8 External USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C Solid-State Drive.

crucial-x8-1024.jpg

A recent example is how it's helped me with a Final Cut X project. I use the X8 during the production phase to house the library and assets for my Digitizing Family Memories video course.

The Crucial SSD relieves disk space from the iMac and is much faster than an external HDD (much faster!). I can blaze through the project with it, then copy the entire bundle to my RAID 1 afterward for archiving. I really noticed a positive difference during activities such as rendering the video out of Final Cut.

Plus, those who work with Final Cut know that it can be temperamental about hard drives used to store its assets. Of all my options, the Crucial X8 has been the most reliable as well. Like I said, these just aren't for travel anymore.

The Crucial X8 is a sleek, solid, handsome drive. It feels like a quality hardware device. It slips easily into my pocket or backpack for transport. And I don't have to baby it since there are no moving parts.

But its performance has been the star of the show. Who would have ever thought that with all the great movie-making hardware that I use, that a $165 pocket-sized SSD would steal the spotlight. And yet is has.

The Crucial 1TB X8 External Solid-State Drive is available now for $165. I highly recommend it.

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #736, April 28, 2020. Today's theme is "Prime Time - Break Out the Fast Glass." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

As we explore spaces in our home environment that we forgot even existed, who knows what photo opportunities that we will uncover. And what better way to capture them to their full extent, then by breaking out our fastest primes to document the shadowy corners of our lives. This week I talk about 5 prime lenses that have become important tools in my new normal.

Prime Time - Break Out the Fast Glass

Zooms are great when you're on the go, but primes are perfect for backyard and interior exploration. Here are the 5 primes that have been keeping me out of trouble during our ongoing Shelter-in-Place.

Olympus 75mm f/1.8

  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm f/1.8 lens on an E-M1 Mark II. Some say this is the sexiest lens that Olympus has ever designed.
  • Pentax-A SMC 50mm f/1.4 on a black Pentax Program Plus. Possibly the most beautiful coatings I've ever seen on an optic.
  • Pentax SMC 50mm f/1.4

  • Voigtlander Ultron 40mm f/2 SL IIS Aspherical Lens for Nikon F on a Nikon D610. The best of both worlds: silky-smooth manual focusing and outstanding design with click-stop aperture ring, but also has the Nikon chip so it records metadata and works on practically every Nikon F-mount camera.
  • Voigtlander 40mm f/2.0

  • Kamlan 50mm F/1.1 II for M4/3 on an Olympus PEN-F. Lovely bokeh and softer contrast make this a wonderful portrait lens for MFT photographers.
  • Kamlan 50mm f/1.1

  • Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 II ASPH. Lens on an Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II. This was the first premium prime lens that I bought for Micro Four Thirds, and I use is practically every day. It's compact, sharp, and contrasty. I even use it for movie making.

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Exploring your home base with your favorite prime can transform the world that you've grown tired of looking at into a completely fresh look. Try it. Get out a prime, and re-explore your home universe. I bet you'll come up with something new.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes in the course will outline a specific set of steps that you have one week to accomplish. Then, the next week, we build on that progress with new techniques and assignments. By the end of the four weeks, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

Patreon members can sign up for free on the Patreon site. I have a post there for you. All you have to do is comment that you want to join us. If you're not a Patreon member, you can sign up at the Inner Circle level for $5 a month and become instantly eligible for the course.

Non-Patreon members can also sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $45.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The current installment of Digitizing Family Memories covers different techniques for scanning snapshots to help you archive inherited photos.

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The 30-minute episode covers techniques for digitizing with a smartphone (don't rule this out, the software is really cool!), flatbed scanner (you probably already have one on your multi-functional printer), and the Epson FastFoto for bulk jobs.

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Next week's installment covers digitizing slides and negatives, followed by organizing all of this work in your favorite photo management software. You can jump in anytime by signing up for Digitizing Family Memories. You'll receive the current classes right away so you can get to work. And the upcoming classes will be sent to you weekly. Here's a quick video BTS overview by the course instructor, Derrick Story.

Do you have shoeboxes of old family prints that you would to take control of? If so, this online course can help you get started in the right direction.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

As photographers, much of our image publishing is via the Web, which usually means that we reduce the size of the original image before posting.

In Capture One Pro, as we simultaneously export and reduce size (sample down), we can also compensate for any loss of detail that happens as we prepare the file for publishing. In the export dialog box we can go to the Adjustments tab and set up Output Sharpening. Here's a look at that process.

Applying sharpening while exporting a photo from Capture One Pro 20 Essential Training by Derrick Story

I like that there are options for both screen and print. For example, if I know I'm going to print this image on matte paper, the output settings would be much different than those for gloss, or for a Web page for that matter.

If you're curious about how easy output sharpening can be in Capture One Pro, watch the movie at the top of this article. It's a solid introduction to this pro feature.

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It's from my latest online class, Capture One Pro 20 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning, or, if you're a lynda.com subscriber, you can watch it there as well.

If you don't have Capture One Pro yet, you can download the 30-day free trial (Mac/Win). No credit card is required, and it's a fully functioning version.

Some applications have some form of output sharpening, but very few provide the control that's available to you in Capture One Pro.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.