Recently in Photography

  Page 14 of 362 in Photography  

The night sky has been a welcome relief for many of us. Fresh air, interesting subject material, challenging work, and no masks! Here are some of the excellent contributions from our TDS Public Group on Flickr (a great place for photography, BTW.) I've picked a few of my favorites.

NEOWISE Comet overlooking Pewetol Island, Trinidad, CA. July 17, 2020 Richard Clompus - Comet Neowise.

Blue Hour Milky Way Gary Eyring - Blue Hour Milky Way.

Comet NEOWISE with ion trail Karen Martin - Comet Neowise with Ion Trail.

Comet NEOWISE over the wreck of the S. S. Atlantus
Michael Hoffman - Comet NEOWISE over the wreck of the S. S. Atlantis.

Comet NEOWISE rising
Nikoletta Szakaly - Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) rising over the Velebit mountain range, as seen from Privlaka, Coratia.

Waxing Crescent Moon Karen Martin - Waxing Crescent Moon.

Thanks to all of our community artists for contributing to the Public Group and sharing their great images!

P7264095-Comet-Neowise-1024.jpg City Lights with Big Dipper - Derrick Story

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I was looking over some of my recent images on the Fujifilm X100V LCD, and it dawned on me how almost all of my photo subjects were wearing masks.

DSCF1740-masked-performers-1024.jpg Musicians playing at the Tides Restaurant in Bodega Bay, CA. Outdoor seating only for lunch. Fujifilm X100V, ISO 160, f/5.6. Photo by Derrick Story. (The fish mask is a nice touch!)

The X100V is the camera I grab when I venture out into the world. And the world these days has covered faces. Odd for portrait work. Add a pair of sunglasses, and you really don't know who these people are.

I'm curious how we will view these images 10 years from now. Will it be, "Man, 2020 was a weird year." Or maybe, "Those are really interesting photos. I'm glad I recorded the moment." Or, for all we know, we may still be wearing face coverings well into the next decade.

DSCF1745-masked.jpg Theresa just after ordering seafood at the Tides Restaurant in Bodega Bay, CA. Fujifilm X100V, ISO 160, f/5.6. Photo by Derrick Story.

The historian in me feels the need to document this moment in time. There's no way to predict how myself or others will feel about these pictures in the future.

It also occurred to me, that outside of a few random medical shots, I don't think I've captured a single mask portrait prior to 2020. Isn't it interesting how much the world has changed visually in the last 6 months?

I will say this, however, many of the face coverings have become more interesting recently. I guess if we're going to be stuck with masks, we can do so with flair.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #748, July 21, 2020. Today's theme is "Time to Think About Workshops (or just too darn early)?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Back in March 2020 when we first sheltered-in-place, many hoped that we could put a lid on this pandemic. But now months later, we still find ourselves in the heat of battle. With two physical workshops remaining on the books, I decided to listen to what you think about upcoming events. And I hope you'll participate in our listener poll.

Time to Think About Workshops (or just too darn early)?

Outdoor workshops have advantages over indoor events. The fresh air circulating makes it far more reasonable to engage in photography, as long as physical distancing is respected.

P4284366.jpeg

But there are still travel logistics to be considered. And what do you do about meals and class sessions? Certainly a lot to consider.

I have two events on the books. The first is the Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop on Oct. 1-3, 2020. The second event is the Costa Rica Creative Immersion Photography Workshop on January 10-17, 2021.

What I'd like to know is what is your opinion about the timing of each of these workshops. You can share your opinion by participating in the reader poll: Time to Start Thinking About Workshops? (for Patreon members). If you're not an Inner Circle Member, you can voice your opinion on our TDS Facebook page. Let your thoughts be heard, then I will recap the results in next week's show.

Review the TDS Show on Apple Podcasts

It's always helpful to have fresh reviews on Apple Podcasts. And a big thank you to those who reviewed our show on Apple Podcasts last week. I truly appreciate it.

I'm Now Writing on Medium

I've started publishing articles on Medium.com as @derrickstory. Posts that aren't anywhere else include: "How IBIS Saved the Day, er, The Night," "From LA to San Francisco, 61 Days in a Different World," and "My 10 Years with Olympus Cameras." If you're interested in these topics, I'm posting an article a week. You might want to stop by and follow.

Canon's 5D DSLR Line is Dead: Report

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.com

If you love the Canon 5D Mark IV DSLR and have been waiting for its successor to be announced, brace yourself for a big disappointment: Canon has reportedly decided to discontinue its popular and pioneering 5D line of cameras.

Canon was, as recently as October 2019, said to be working on the 5D Mark V for a release by the end of 2020. But with a big push toward mirrorless cameras and the industry struggling with the economic devastation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems that the camera has now been erased from Canon's roadmap.

Canon Rumors is hearing from a reliable source that there will not be a Canon 5D Mark V and that there will be no direct successor to the Canon 5D Mark IV.

The original Canon 5D was announced in 2005 and was the first full-frame DSLR with a standard DSLR size (as opposed to the double-grip form factor of the 1D line). In 2008, Canon announced the Canon 5D Mark II, which made a huge splash as the first Canon EOS camera to offer video recording capabilities.

Pentax doubles down on DSLRs: "there is simply no substitute"

You can read the entire article on DigitalCameraWorld.com.

On social media, Pentax has been teasing a statement about its future. Now the manufacturer has revealed its statement, and it is simple: "Pentax believes in the future of SLR photography".

It is the latest in a long line of messages from the company, eschewing a mirrorless future in favor of DSLRs. A strategy that seems increasingly questionable, in a world where every other major manufacturer has put its eggs in the mirrorless basket.

The company launched a microsite dedicated to extolling the virtues of SLR cameras and, specifically, the optical viewfinder - which Pentax is positioning as the key USP of its entire product line.

"Pentax is committed to the future of SLR photography through the continued development of camera technology," states the strange new site. And the pro-SLR, anti-mirrorless sentiment is echoed in an accompanying new promotional video.

"It's such a joy to use an SLR, that there is simply no substitute for this style of shooting."

Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs Now Available for Inner Circle Members

In this 40-minute video, I show you an easy way to incorporate audio compact discs into your current digital music library using iTunes/Apple Music for Mac or Windows.

You'll learn how to choose the best codec for your music, how to easily incorporate album artwork, and tips to keeping everything organized along the way.

It's available right now, for free, to TDS Inner Circle Members. And if you're not part of the Circle yet, you can sign up today and watch the movie right away. Just click on the Patreon tile that's on all the pages of The Digital Story.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Other than a few choice hardware announcements, this hasn't been a great time for photographers. Events have been cancelled, travel is discouraged, and we've found ourselves staring eyeball to eyeball with the cat way too many times.

Then Comet NEOWISE appeared.

Comet Neowise - Santa Rosa, CA Comet Neowise in the Northwest Skies of Santa Rosa, CA. Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II with Olympus PRO 45mm f/1.2 lens. Photo by Derrick Story.

For those of us who enjoy night photography, this was truly a gift from God. First, it appeared in the early mornings. But by mid-July, it was also showing after twilight for stargazers in North America. And she is a beauty.

Comets are mystical beings. They cruise around the solar system fueled by matter that's thousands of years old. They appear. Then they disappear. And this one could not have come at a better time.

Most photographers have the tools necessary to enjoy this event: binoculars, tripod, fast lens. And suddenly, we have something to look forward to. For just a few moments each night, we can take a break from politics, disease, and injustice. We can get back to making images and sharing them with the world.

What a breath of fresh air on a cool crisp night. Thank you NEOWISE.

My Gear List for Comet NEOWISE

binoculars.jpg

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Camera manufacturers have been making good strides on creating software that allows us to use our existing cameras as high quality webcams for videoconferencing. Canon got the ball rolling, and now Panasonic, Olympus, and Fujifilm have applications as well.

But the manufacture software doesn't necessarily support all of their cameras. And what about the other brands? If you're using a Mac, Cascable Pro Webcam might be the solution you've been waiting for.

cascable-webcam.jpg

It supports hundreds of cameras. If your camera is listed and has a check next to Control and Automation, you're in business. The software also works with most of the major streaming apps as shown below.

compatible-services.jpg

You can click the Download Free Trial button on the Cascable page and take it for a spin. If you like what you see, until July 24, it's just $30 as part of a launch sale. After that, a license will set you back $40. Cascable Pro Webcam requires macOS 10.14.4 or newer.

Up Your Videoconferencing Game with this Online Training

Once your get your camera set up, you may want to improve how you look and sound as well. You can download my course, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing for just $14.95. You'll learn how to transform your home office into a online studio in just a few easy steps. Sound and look great for your next conference call!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #747, July 14, 2020. Today's theme is "Comets, Night Sky, and More." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

What a great time to be outside, under the stars. If you're in North America, Jupiter and Saturn are both visible, the Milky Way is out, and as a bonus, Comet Neowise is now hanging out in the North right after sunset. So grab your binoculars, pack your camera, and let's have some fun. You don't even have to wear a mask.

Comets, Night Sky, and More

So I'm heading out first on Tuesday night, and again on Wednesday if weather conditions remain clear. I'll need a good view of the North because Comet Neowise will only be between 5 and 10 degrees above the horizon at that time. But I'll also take a look at the Milky Way, and of course enjoy the visible planets as well.

Thank goodness for this opportunity. The timing couldn't be better. Between the nice summer weather and the stir-craziness that comes with Shelter in Place, a little night photography to shake things up sounds perfect.

If you want to head out as well, here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare.

cometron-1024.jpeg

Don't Forget Your Night Sky Binoculars

Even if your main objective is to take pictures, a pair of night sky binoculars is handy for surveying the sky and enjoying the show.

Get a Good Astronomy App

Loading an app such as Stellarium on your iPhone or iPad will make it easy to locate the comet in the night sky. You can plan ahead of time with it by entering location and time to figure out the best viewing of Neowise, or anything else for that matter, then use it in the field in realtime.

Pack Your Camera Kit

I'm using my Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II with the Olympus PRO 40-150mm f/2.8 zoom. I'm going to bring my tripod as well.

As for exposure, I don't want star trails, so I'm going to use the 500 Rule to help me determine the maximum shutter speed (500 divided by the true focal length of the lens). So, for example, with my lens set at 40 mm, the math would work like this; 500 / 80 = 6.25 seconds. Therefore the maximum shutter speed I can use before the stars start to blur is 6 seconds. As for ISO, I'm going to start with 1600 and adjust as necessary. My aperture will be set to f/2.8. I'm going to test with noise reduction on and off. (It does double the amount of processing.)

Bring Flashlight with a Red Filter

A flashlight with a red filter will help you keep your night vision and make it easier to see objects in the sky.

Finding a Good Location

For comet shots in particular, I like a good scene to complement the night sky. This is probably the hardest part of the assignment for me.

Once you find the location, make sure you can be comfortable while you're there. I always bring my camp chairs and a blanket.

Sony a7S III, Canon R5 and R6

There is so much happening in the full frame world right now with the formal announcement of the Canon R5 and R6, and the anticipated unveiling of the Sony a7S III.

It's a pretty high stakes game. The Canon R5 with RF 24-105mm f/4L lens will cost $4,999. That gets you 45MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, 8K30 Raw and 4K120 10-Bit Internal Video, and Sensor-Shift 5-Axis Image Stabilization.

The Canon R6 with RF 24-105mm f/4L lens will cost $3,599. That gets you 20MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, 4K60 and FHD 120 10-Bit Internal Video, and Sensor-Shift 5-Axis Image Stabilization.

The RF line of lenses has really been impressing reviewers, so this package looks very strong on paper. Preorders have been brisk to say the least.

We'll see how the Sony stacks up once it is officially announced. But there's a lot of heat in the kitchen right now for full frame cameras.

Review the TDS Show on Apple Podcasts

It's always helpful to have fresh reviews on Apple Podcasts. If you haven't reviewed our show there, please consider taking a few minutes to do so. I truly appreciate it!

Ripping and Cataloging Audio CDs Now Available for Inner Circle Members

In this 40-minute video, I show you an easy way to incorporate audio compact discs into your current digital music library using iTunes/Apple Music for Mac or Windows.

You'll learn how to choose the best codec for your music, how to easily incorporate album artwork, and tips to keeping everything organized along the way.

It's available right now, for free, to TDS Inner Circle Members. And if you're not part of the Circle yet, you can sign up today and watch the movie right away. Just click on the Patreon tile that's on all the pages of The Digital Story.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Let me put it this way: If I bought the same amount of Canon original ink cartridges that are in the box pictured below, it would cost far more than I spent for the printer.

ink-box.jpeg

I do a lot of printing. I output labels for TheFilmCameraShop, snapshots for family, concepts for projects, and more. And since I switched to Starink Compatible Ink Cartridges, I'm paying a fraction of the cost that I once spent on Canon OEM ink. My printer hasn't melted, clogged up, or slowed down in any way what-so-ever.

Here's what I spent $18.99 for with free shipping:

lots-of-ink.jpg

In case you can't see the picture, that's 17 cartridges that were fully filled and ready for action. The contents are environmental friendly, certified by ISO9001, ISO14001, CE, RoHS. The chips are recognized by the printer as Canon ink, and most importantly, the output looks great.

Canon-with-Ink-1024.jpeg

Now to be clear, I'm not talking about my high-end 13" printer for fine art work on archival stock. I'm still using top quality Red River Paper and original Canon ink for those jobs.

But the bulk of my printing are quick-turnaround jobs using a Canon Pixma for greeting cards, labels, scanned documents, and snapshots. Why should I pay through the nose for ink to review a memo or output a USPS label?

If you have a lovely multifunctional printer that you're not being creative with because of the cost of ink, then consider Starink Compatible Ink Cartridges. I don't think twice about making a personalized card for a friend, or a printing a 4"x6" for my Mom - and nor should you.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

As promised, Fujifilm has released their webcam software for macOS, which now makes it available on two major platforms (Mac and Windows).

webcam-fuji.jpg

The 1.0 release works on macOS 10.12, 10.13, 10.14, and 10.15, and requires 4 GB of RAM. For PC users, Windows 10 is necessary to run the application. Not all Fujifilm cameras will work. Here's the list of current compatible models.

cameras.jpg

A Mac User Guide is also available.

As we continue to move in the direction of remote work groups and family gatherings online, this is a welcome benefit. You can download the software for either platform here.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #746, July 7, 2020. Today's theme is "The Resurgence of Car Camping for Photographers." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Once again, the car has become our sanctuary. As we learn more about airborne transmission of coronavirus, public places become even less appealing than before. The one place, outside of our home, that we can relax and breath deeply is our vehicles. And by extension, car camping may become our most viable alternative for photography adventure. Here are some tips for a comfortable experience.

The Resurgence of Car Camping for Photographers

The vehicle I've been waiting for, and still have a few years to go before it's available in North America, is the Volkswagen Buzz electric bus. It is a nimble alternative to RVs and trailers, letting me take advantage of highway rest stops and public campgrounds while still easily parking at the grocery store.

Audi-1024.jpeg

But in the meantime, I've outfitted my Audi A3 to serve the same purpose. You may wonder, how does a tall guy road trip comfortably in a compact wagon? Actually, with the right gear, it is very nice. And I thought that you might enjoy hearing about some of the tricks I've learned over the years for overnight stays on the road. Here are five favorites.

Where You Can Stay and for How Long

For maximum flexibility, it pays to be familiar with the locations and rules for the Interstate Rest Areas that are along the way. In California, for example, there is an 8-hour stay limit. No overnight parking or camping. That means, if you're will to sleep inside your vehicle, you can get a full night's rest. (Some states don't allow this at all; others give you even more time.)

Customizing Your Reclining Seat

If you're like me and don't have your cool electric bus yet, then you can outfit your car seat for a comfortable night's rest. Do this at home before you leave.

In my Audi A3, the passenger seat goes all the way back to touching the back seat. I have a few flat throw pillows, like the kind you would accessorize a couch with, stashed in the Audi. If I raise up the base of the seat, the back goes more flat. I then add a throw pillow to the base where I normally sit, and that evens out the configuration.

Add a stuff-able camping blanket and a travel pillow for your head, and you are set for the night. Generally speaking, I'm pretty tired by the time I set this all up, so that helps too.

Hot Coffee in the Morning

My go-to kit starts with a Jetboil Zip Camping Stove ($68). If you've never used one of these. you will go crazy over it. They are so hot!

Next, I break out my water jug and a packet of Starbucks VIA Instant Italian Roast Dark Roast Coffee. Most rest areas have picnic tables that you can use to brew the coffee. It's delicious and quite civilized.

Charging Up

One of the things that I like about the Audi is that it has an abundance of 12-volt outlets that remain hot even when the engine is turned off. I keep a handful of USB adapters in the glovebox to charge my phone, watch, and iPad mini.

I can also charge my MacBook Pro using a POTEK 500W Power Inverter DC 12 V to 110V AC Car Converter with Digital Display ($39) or one like it. I don't use the laptop as much as I do the iPad mini when working in the car. But the converter is good to have just in case.

Keeping it Cool

It wouldn't be a road trip without a few cold refreshments stashed, plus maybe a string cheese or two. Hands down my favorite storage container for this is the eBags Crew Cooler II ($55).

First of all, the cooler area is just right for most overnight trips. This eBag holds about twice as much as a standard lunch cooler. And its insulation is quite good.

Beyond that, however, I really like the dry pockets on top, front, and both sides. The top area is particularly good for storing protein bars, nuts, condiments, paper towels, and plasticware.

The bag seems to fit anywhere in the car that I need it to, from a tight spot in the trunk, to on the floor in the back behind a front seat.

Handsome, durable, and will last you years - this eBag is a great travel companion.

So, gear up, don't forget your mask and hand sanitizer, and treat yourself to a short getaway. The change of scenery will do you wonders.

Olympus has NOT fallen: exclusive Olympus UK interview

You can read the entire post here on Amateur Photographer.

"Don't panic... business is pretty strong." Olympus UK's Mark Thackara gives a wide-ranging interview and as you can imagine, there is a lot to talk about.

Mark Thackara, Marketing Brand Manager for Olympus UK and a 35 year veteran of the company, met AP's Nigel Atherton and Geoff Harris to cast more light on what's been going on, answer questions about past strategy and future developments, and explain why going full frame still doesn't make sense for them.

How do you respond to negative speculation online about Olympus's future?
I also see a lot of positive comments online. If you want to be able to take your camera in a bag on a plane, with a good range of lenses, the benefits of our system are very clear. The argument about full frame will carry on for ever. It's no different from cars. If you want a Land Rover Defender you will buy one but if you want something more compact you can easily park in town, you will buy a Mini.
Nobody can promise that Olympus will be here in 100 years time, as you can't say that about any brand. What I can say is, we have seen the product road map, including the new lens one, and it's very exciting. The company wouldn't be bringing out news lenses if they didn't believe in the system. We are quietly positive.

So what is your final messages to current Olympus owners, or prospective customers, who might be worried about expanding their system or buying into it?
Don't panic. As far as we are concerned it is business as usual. Businesses change hands and flourish, so there no reason this won't be the case here. I have been through all sorts of ups and downs in my 35 years with Olympus. Our basic technology and core proposition are still very good.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Just Released! Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

It's a concern that lingers in the mind of just about every digital photographer: "How do I preserve my digital images and make them accessible while doing so?"

If you've had those thoughts, then help is available now. My latest LinkedIn Learning/lynda.com title, Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos is a complete course that shows you a variety of options and techniques to take control of protecting your image collection.

As your photo library grows, it becomes more important to back up your work. In this course, I teach the concepts and techniques behind efficient photo management for the long haul. First, I compare a few selected photo storage philosophies and techniques. I then show you how to create an ultralight backup system for travel, also back up photos stored on a laptop (or desktop), and finally, review archiving strategies for storing photos for decades.

Here are just a few of the talking points that I cover in the training.

  • Creating an ultralight backup system for travel.
  • Sending images from cameras to mobile devices.
  • Internal vs. external hard drives (both have their roles).
  • Organizing photos in managed vs. referenced catalogs vs. Finder-based.
  • Re-archiving images from older hard drives (do this before they fail!).
  • Integrating cloud services into your overall strategy.
  • Including a few tips you might not have considered, such as making archival prints of your best images.

You can start fine-tuning your workflow today by watching Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. It's a great way to begin the process of protecting your digital media for years to come.

The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing

If you want to learn more about looking and sounding great for your next online interaction, then I think you'll very much enjoy my latest online workshop, The Essential Steps to Impressive Video Conferencing.

This 1-hour deep dive focuses on the 3 major areas of successful online interaction: Audio, Video, and Environment. During the course, I walk you through a variety of techniques that range from simple using gear that you already have, to improving your chops through a few inexpensive purchases.

The course is currently available for free to our Inner Circle Members on Patreon. Members, just go to our Patreon site, and all the information will be there. If you're not already an Inner Circle Member, you can join us for $5 a month.

The course is also available on our Nimble Photographer Workshop Page for $14.95.

I have tons of great tips and techniques waiting for you there. If you want to get serious about how you come across during online meetings, classes, interviews, and family interactions, then you definitely will want to watch this course.

Digitizing Family Memories Course Now Available Online

Each of the four classes will outline a specific set of steps for you to accomplish. By the end of the course, you will have an organized digital archive of your most valuable family images.

You can sign up for the course by visiting the Workshops page on The Nimble Photographer. The course fee is a reasonable $39 (on sale right now). It includes the 4 class videos, class notes, and access to the class forums that are a part of each movie.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we've had to postpone our July photography workshop at Lassen Volcanic Park. We so still have on the schedule, however, our Eastern Sierra event in October.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The scanner mode in the iPhone/Mac tandem goes beyond merely taking pictures with your smartphone to using them much in the same way you would with a dedicated flatbed device. There's a lot of functionality here, and these tools can be a real timesaver, especially when you're on the go with your laptop. Here's how it works.

Enable-Scanner.jpg Turn on your iPhone then enable the scanning function in Preview.

IMG_6498.jpeg

How to Scan with Your iPhone

Start by turning on your phone. Then open Preview on your Mac and enable the scanner capability (File > Import from iPhone or iPad). You have the option to take a picture, such as a quick product shot, or go to scanner mode.

Taking a photo is pretty straightforward. The familiar camera interface appears, you tap the button, then have the option to "Retake" or "Use Photo." If you tap on "Use Photo," the image appears in Preview ready to edit or use as is.

The scanning function is even cooler. Once you capture the image, you have the opportunity to crop it before sending it over to the Mac. Move the four corners of the frame until the scan meets your approval. Then tap "Keep Scan." You can continue scanning items until you have everything you need. Once you're done, tap the "Save" button, and all of the scans in that group will all appear on your Mac in a single document. Very nice!

Once the Document is on Your Mac

Now that you have an open Preview document, you can treat in the usual ways. Generally speaking, photos will be saved as Jpegs, and scans as PDF documents. But the choices are entirely yours.

saving-scan.jpg

After a few practice runs, you should be quite efficient capturing high quality scans with the iPhone/Mac tandem. You can use your iPad as well. This is a particularly good workflow for mobile business types with a MacBook Pro.

Give it a try and see what your think.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.