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I've always been a fan of using fill flash, but over the last couple years I've fallen into the habit of using exposure compensation instead, rotating the adjustment ring until my subject appeared properly exposed in the electronic viewfinder. This approach works fine, but there are definitely some tradeoffs.

fill-flash-Derrick-Story.jpg Fill flash used with an Olympus compact camera, Kodak Portrait 400 35mm film. Photo by Derrick Story.

With backlighting, for example, I often lost almost all the background detail. And sometimes that information contributes to the overall context of the shot. The above image is a good example.

The background setting is important. It lets us know that we're in a family environment and at a home. If it went pure white, as it would with exposure compensation on the child, I would be left with the boy and the basketball hoop, but not much else.

Plus, fill flash adds a twinkle to the eyes and a flattering exposure of the face. Most photo subjects benefit from the front lighting that evens out features and brightens the eyes.

What reminded me of all these benefits was my compact Olympus 35mm film camera. I had it with me for a family gathering and was using it to grab a few memories. We were congregated in a nice shady patio with bright midday light outside.

My little 35mm Olympus has an optical viewfinder, and that's it. No LCD screen, no EVF, no realtime exposure compensation feedback. But what it does have is an intelligent popup flash. That's what I used. And I love the results!

Without it, the bulk of my exposures would have had underexposed subjects and nicely lit backgrounds. Not exactly what I was looking for. But using fill, my subjects look great, and I sill have some nice context for the environment - a lovely balance.

As a result, fill flash is back on my radar. I can (and should) use it on my Fujifilm X100V and the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III, both with built-in flash units.

All of this is thanks that great looking roll of film that came back from the lab. Go figure.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #793, June 1, 2021. Today's theme is "Get Serious: The Fujifilm GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless." I'm Derrick Story.

GFX100S-Front-P5311568-GFX100S.jpg

Opening Monologue

When you first pickup the GFX 100S, you know you're playing in a different league. Its heft combined with confidence-inspiring specification builds anticipation that something wonderful is about to happen. And the pictures do not disappoint. The question is: Is this camera for you? We'll explore that topic on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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Get Serious: The Fujifilm GFX 100S Medium Format Mirrorless

The Fujifilm GFX 100S ($5,999) is a 102MP mirrorless camera featuring a 43.8 x 32.9mm BSI CMOS sensor. It produces files that measure 11,648 X 8,736 pixels, yet feels like a pro caliber DSLR in the hands.

I've been shooting with the hefty but amazing GF 80mm f/1.7 R WR lens ($2,299) that provides an effective focal length of 63mm, and the relatively compact Fujifilm GF 50mm f/3.5 R LM WR lens ($999) with a 40mm effective focal length. Both optics are outstanding.

Basic specs for the GFX 100S include:

  • 102MP 43.8 x 32.9mm BSI CMOS Sensor
  • X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • 4K 30fps Video; F-Log Gamma, 12-Bit Raw Out
  • 3.69m-Dot OLED EVF
  • 3.2" 2.36m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 5-Axis Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization
  • 425-Point Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • ISO 100-12800, Up to 5 fps Shooting
  • 400MP Pixel Shift Multi-Shot
  • 19 Film Simulation Modes
  • 16-bit RAW files
  • Dual Slot SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II) memory

cat-portrait-GFX100S-1600.jpg

In so many ways, it feels like a mirrorless camera. What I thought was interesting was that since I shoot regularly with a Fujifilm X100V, I felt right at home with the GFX 100S. The menu system, controls placement, and general behavior are very similar. Honestly, the GFX felt like its bigger brother.

There are differences of course. The GFX tops out at 5 fps burst mode, the picture taking experience is more sounds and feels more like a DSLR, and the lenses are much larger as well.

The camera's interaction with the Fujifilm Cam Remote app was just as sure-footed as with the X100V. I especially appreciated the realtime geotagging that the tandem accomplishes with ease.

In terms of shooting experience, the autofocusing was both responsive and accurate with both the 50mm and 80mm optics. In addition to click aperture settings, each lens sports the "A" and "C" options that allow you to use automatic mode or customize the aperture changes with the front dial on the camera. Very nice!

The camera is very comfortable to hold, especially if you have large hands. The grip is deep and is complemented by an excellent thumb rest on the back. You could hold the camera with one hand and shoot, which is saying something for a medium format machine.

I love the back LCD. Not only is it sharp and bright, but it tilts both up and down, and sideways. Very clever and useful. Once again, the camera behaves like a modern mirrorless allowing for easy and fast composition on the back LCD. In fact, it's really fun to shoot this way.

GFX100S-Top-P5311579-GFX100S.jpg

The top LCD is also wonderful. You have your choice of white lettering on a black background, or black lettering on a light gray background. So you can use it in any type of lighting.

As you might suspect, image quality is outstanding for both Jpegs and RAWs. I very much enjoy editing the files in Capture One Pro 21. So much data to work with!

Is this camera for you? I discuss this in the podcast.

Capture One announces native M1 support, promises significant performance improvements

You can read the entire article on DP Review.

Add another high-end photo editing application to the list for Apple M1 Macs. Capture One has announced that Capture One 21 is now ready for Apple Silicon. A new update, available now, allows the popular editor to run natively on the M1 chip.

When Apple announced its silicon and the new M1 Macs, which currently comprise MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, Mac mini and iMac models, Apple remarked how simple it was for software to be ported from Intel to Apple's silicon. It was a far deal more complicated for some software, such as Capture One.

Capture One says that given the power of Apple's M1 chip, and the 'seismic shift' the new technology represented, it was time to 'completely rethink' its software. To get Capture One running natively on M1 Macs and for it to take full advantage of the hardware, Capture One had to go further than ever before.

Capture One had to be rearchitected from the ground up. Today's update a fundamental redesign of the software and one that Capture One believes is well-positioned for the future. As Capture One writes, 'the future looks fast.' Capture One on an M1-powered Mac has many impressive performance improvements. The new Advanced Imported is 50% quicker. Key tools such as Crop and Rotate are twice as fast. Making local edits with brushes and using Style Brushes is smoother than ever.

The new Capture One 21 update is available now to all existing users.

Editor's note: I've seen tests that report that importing is 30 percent faster with this version of C1P on an M1 compared to the previous version.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

Did You Shoot the Lunar Eclipse?

I had clear skies last Wednesday morning allowing me to shoot the lunar eclipse with my Olympus 40-150mm PRO lens and an OM-D E-M5 Mark II camera. You can see the shot here. It made Flickr Explore.

Using OI Share made it a wonderful experience. I'll discuss it on the podcast.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg Croasdill recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Lunar Eclipse with Wispy Cloud

On Tuesday's TDS Podcast, I talked about techniques for photographing the May 2021 lunar eclipse. I went with the method I discussed using the Olympus PRO 40-150mm lens and manual exposure (ISO 1600, 1/1.3, f/2.8).

D-Story-P5265723-lunar-eclipse.jpg

I had also discussed using the Olympus OI Share app on my iPhone as the remote release. This is what made the shoot so enjoyable. Instead of craning my neck to peer though the electronic viewfinder or fiddle with the LCD, I had the entire show right there on my iPhone. Plus I could use the device to adjust shutter speeds, recompose the frame, set focus, and of course, take the actual shot.

Plus, being able to review my work in the field on the iPhone was also a real confidence booster. That way I knew for sure that I was getting what I thought I had photographed. (And what a lovely celestial show it was!)

You can listen to the podcast here.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #792, May 25, 2021. Today's theme is "How to Photograph the Upcoming Lunar Eclipse." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Photographing celestial events is a wonderful way to add variety to your photography. No matter what your thing is (unless you're an astrophotographer), capturing a comet or an eclipse in your viewfinder can add a dash of enthusiasm to your creative endeavors. If you agree, then I have a great opportunity for you in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, a total lunar eclipse. And on today's show, I'm going to discuss how to make the most of it.

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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How to Photograph the Upcoming Lunar Eclipse

watchers-1024.jpeg

In this first segment, I cover everything you need to know to photography the upcoming lunar eclipse. If you want to read more about it, check out this great article, How to Photograph a Total Lunar Eclipse on Petapixel that I used for reference.

Adobe update brings camera phone 'portrait mode' to Photoshop

You can read the entire article on Digital Camera World.

The latest update to Adobe Photoshop will give desktop photo editors an instant portrait effect similar to that of the 'Portrait Mode' found on camera phones. The update includes a new Neural Filter called Depth Blur that lets photographers choose different focal points in their images and blurs the background intelligently, in doing so creating a bokeh effect similar to using a fast portrait-length lens.

It is already possible to create this effect in Photoshop by using various blurs and manually masking subjects, but the process can be tedious and time consuming, especially for beginners. The Depth Blur feature automates the process and, although not instant, makes achieving sharp subjects and blurred backgrounds much easier.

The new tool is part of a May 2021 update to Adobe Photoshop and can be found in the 'Filters' drop-down menu, under 'Neural Filters'. It works by creating a depth map of your image which can be adjusted with an artificial depth of field. The effect can give images that were not taken with a wide-open fast lens the appearance of one (giving you the option to focus on foreground or background objects and blur out the background or foreground respectively).

There is plenty of room for altering the strength of the effect, with Blur Strength, Focal Range, Focal Distance, as well as Haze, Warmth, and Brightness adjustment available before applying the filter. You can preview the effect these adjustments will make as well as changes to the desired focal point in the image.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

Photoshop's Brand New Depth Blur Feature Needs a Lot of Work

You can read the entire article on stoppers.

With the latest batch of updates, Photoshop has added a new feature to its array of neural filters: depth blur. Very much in beta, this tool has potential, but there's clearly a lot of improvements required before it becomes worth using.

Unmesh Dinda of PiXimperfect runs you through the new feature that arrived in the latest update of Photoshop, and while the depth mapping functionality will bring lots of possibilities, it's clear from this beta version of Depth Blur that Photoshop has a lot of work to do before it becomes useful to photographers working with high-resolution images. Dinda shows that existing tools within Photoshop can create far better results, and it's possible that Adobe's engineers will seek to merge these techniques to create improvements.

While Dinda's experiences show the current limitations, Adobe's potential to harness machine learning will only expand, particularly as more images become available. If you're wondering why Adobe has decided to roll out a beta feature that is still so far from producing good results, it's probably because its machine learning needs to figure out what works and what doesn't -- notice how the dialog box asks you each time if you're happy with the results. The neural filters depend on this feedback to improve.

While it's easy to scoff at these early efforts, it's quite possible that in five years you will struggle to differentiate between an image shot at f/1.4 and the same scene shot at f/5.6 with some depth blur applied. Whether this will merely increase the number of images with an insanely shallow depth of field or if it has a practical application for photographers remains to be seen.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

Greg C. recently wrote me this: "My father-in-law passed away recently and I would like to donate his film cameras to the Film Camera Shop. I've heard you speak of this for years on your podcast and now finally I have some good equipment to send you way."

If you've discovered a film camera that's no longer being used, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

0 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Now that client work is returning, I thought this would be a good time to take a look at Fujifilm's latest medium format offering, the GFX 100S.

fujifilm-GFX-100S-Front.jpg

It is a handsome 102 MP mirrorless camera with a whopping 43.8mm x 32.9mm BSI CMOS sensor. It supports most of the features that we would want in an everyday camera such as 5-Axis Sensor-Shift image stabilization, 3.2" 2.36m-dot tilting touchscreen LCD, 3,690,000 dot electronic viewfinder, and an ISO range from 100-12800.

Indeed, it is a handful by mirrorless standards - 5.9" x 4.1" x 3.4" and weighing in at 2 pounds without lens - but fairly svelte in the world of medium format. Realativity speaking, it's also affordable at $5,999 for the body.

I'm starting my journey using the GF 80mm f/1.7 R WR lens ($2,299) that provides a 35mm equivalent of 63mm with a fast maximum aperture of f/1.7. I will also be testing the compact GF 50mm f/3.5 R LM WR lens ($999) that is essentially a medium format pancake lens with a wider 35mm equivalent of 40mm. You know how much I love 40mms! I'm hoping this lens makes the GFX 100S a bit more nimble.

Assignment 1 - Client Shoot Downtown San Jose

I had an interior portrait shoot for a client in downtown San Jose. I thought this would be a perfect first trial of the GFX 100S. The camera handled the mixed lighting (widows and artificial) very well rendering excellent color. I played with the Skin Smoothing feature and was impressed with its rendering.

At 5 frames per second, it's a bit slower in burst mode than I'm used to. But for this assignment it was enough. As you can imagine, depth of field falloff was wonderful.

And interestingly enough, since I shoot with an X100V, I was able to navigate the very similar interface of the GFX 100S. That was a nice bonus on a first shoot. Other than its larger size, it was very much like shooting with any other Fujifilm camera.

I can't share the client shots yet, but I did take a few snaps in the off moments.

San-Jose-inside-DSCF0185-Kelli-Captial-Clubgg.jpg Inside Decoration - ISO 500, f/4, 80mm lens.

San-Jose-DSCF0194-Kelli-Captial-Clubgg.jpg Fresh Air Outside - ISO 100, f/3.6, 80mm lens.

Thoughts After Day 1

For a hardcore cropped-frame mirrorless photographer like me, the Fujifilm GFX 100S with the GF 80mm f/1.7 R WR lens is certainly a handful. But it is well-balanced and very comfortable to hold.

It also inspires confidence. As long as my shutter speeds stayed reasonable, I never worried about image quality. I shot SuperFine Jpegs in a variety of lighting conditions inside and out, and I could use those images right out of the camera.

Between the large sensor size, image stabilization, primo prime lens, and Fujifilm technology, I had a huge safety net that let me focus on the compositions and subject, and not really concern myself with camera settings. And the pictures look great.

In future installments, I'll explore the RAW files, different subjects, and the 50mm lens. I'll wrap it all up with a podcast in the future. But we're off to a great start!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #791, May 18, 2021. Today's theme is "It's Spring! 5 Tips to Clean Up Your Photography Act." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Spring cleaning shouldn't be limited to our yards, garages, and closets. We get behind on photography-related tasks as well. It's not that we're lazy or distracted (OK, well maybe distracted), it's just that we forget to do certain things that may really help us in the long run. Consider today's show a handy checklist for those springtime tasks. Look at it this way, everyone of these is more fun than cleaning the garage. I hope you enjoy the show.

Tune-In Via Your Favorite Podcast App!


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It's Spring! 5 Tips to Clean Up Your Photography Act

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I remember that I once saw a pie chart of how a professional photographer's time was spent each week. Ironically, on about 15 percent was actually taking pictures.

Fortunately, as enthusiasts, we have far fewer business chores to attend to. But that doesn't mean we're off the hook entirely.

Take a look at this checklist and start mapping out your plan.

  • Firmware Updates - I had missed one for my X100V only to discover that it added webcam ability to my camera. That's a pretty big deal these days. Be sure to review your firmware status for both camera bodies and lenses.
  • Equipment Inventory - I'm sure I just did one not too long ago. I looked it up, and yes, more than 5 years had passed. Wow! Time flies. And boy has my gear changed a lot since then. Be sure to record pictures, serial numbers, and any purchase information you may have.
  • Get Rid of Gear that You're Not Using - It's amazing how fast we can accumulate new gear. And many times those new pieces render stuff we already have as obsolete. You can tie this project to your inventory efforts and get bonus points for efficiency.
  • Test Your Backup - I know you're already backing up your valuable images. But when was the last time you tested your system for integrity? Now would be a good time to ensure you can actually restore.
  • Clean Off Your Laptop Hard Drive - Now that the sun is shinning for those of us North of the equator, you'll probably be adding many more pictures to your photo catalogs. Clean off those laptop drives now!

You may not have time for all of these. But accomplishing just one or two can pay off big up the road.

News Corp Australia Has Laid Off the Last of Its Photographers: Report

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.

News Corp Australia has reportedly laid off the last of its staff photographers and converted fully to using freelancers according to a new report. The last eight photographers were informed last week that their positions were being made redundant.

According to The Guardian, the Rupert Murdoch-owned publication giant called the last photographers who worked for the Geelong Advertiser, the NT News, the Hobart Mercury, Townsville Bulletin, the Gold Coast Bulletin, and the Cairns Post into a management meeting and were told them that they would be replaced by freelancers.

The report also states that those eight staff members -- the last of a full-time staff that once numbered over 100 -- were given the opportunity to purchase their staff photography equipment at discounted prices and come back as outsourced, freelance labor.

News Corp has been moving towards a freelancer model when it comes to photography for several years. Last year, the company let its chief photographer Gary Ramage go, and in November it cut 16 photography positions out of 25 total jobs it eliminated.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The 5 favorite camera brands in Japan (and you won't believe who's first!)

You can read the entire article on Digital Camera World.

Japan's favorite camera brand isn't Canon. It isn't Nikon. It isn't Sony, or Olympus or Fujifilm. No, Japan's favorite camera brand is Pentax / Ricoh.

That's according to the latest results in a survey being conducted by IT Media, asking Japanese consumers to choose their favorite digital camera maker. And despite the best Pentax cameras all being DSLRs, and facing quite a technological disparity compared to the likes of the best Canon cameras and best Sony cameras, that hasn't stopped Ricoh being Japan's most beloved brand in the camera industry.

The survey (spotted by Pentax Rumors) still has another ten days to run, closing on 27 May, but so far the results are pretty eye-opening. Almost a quarter of Japanese users say that Pentax / Ricoh is their favorite brand, with nearly a fifth pledging allegiance to Nikon.

Here are the top 6 - Pentax, Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, and Fujifilm.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

2 Seats Remaining for Our Ultimate B&W Photography Workshop - July 2021.

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capture One Pro 21 includes many terrific new tools, including Speed Edit, Dehaze, and HEIC support. But the feature I've been enjoying most is the Import Browser that makes it easy for me to decide what I want to bring into the catalog, and what to leave behind.

import-browser-1024.jpg The Capture One Pro 21 Import Browser

In my latest training for LinkedIn Learning, titled Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training, I cover not only Capture One Pro 21, but the new things added with the point 1 update, including the fabulous Import Browser.

Here's an overview of the training to whet your appetite.

CaptureOne-Screenshot-1024.jpg Getting to know Capture One Pro 21 from Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training by Derrick Story

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

I hope you enjoy the show!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #790, May 11, 2021. Today's theme is "Supercharge Your Editing App." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of the reasons we don't move from an existing photo management app, such as Lightroom, to another is because we have so much time invested in it. Changing horses doesn't make sense. But what if we could breathe new life into our existing workflow without having to relocate a single file? That sounds more palatable. And it's the first story in today's TDS Photography Podcast. I hope you enjoy the show.

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Supercharge Your Editing App

Most of us are familiar with plugins. Over the years I've covered quite a few including RAW Power, Luminar, and Pixelmator. I had always wanted to include ON1 in that list, but my tests had hit bumps in the road. But now with ON1 Effects 2021, I can say that it's been a great ride.

on1-effects-1024.jpg

Can Use it with and for Practically Everything

Regardless of what your base app is - Lightroom, Photoshop, Capture One Pro, Photos for macOS, PaintShop Pro, or Affinity Photo - Effects can add creativity and capability to your existing workflow.

It includes tools for masking and retouching. There are tons of presets included, and you can create your own as well. My favorite part are the Filters. There are some truly interesting and creative ones including B&W, Glow, Grunge, Dynamic Contrast, Channel Mixer, Skin Retouching, Sun Flare, and many, many more.

Powerful, but Easy to Use Printing too

One of the delightful surprises I discovered while testing Effects was its well thought out printing module. This is something that I've been disappointed with time and time again with other applications. Not this time.

The Effects print module is easy to use, but provides the options that most photographers are looking for. And the very cool thing about it, is that you can use the print module while in plugin mode. In the case of Photos, I went to Edit, chose Effects, then set up my print job within the plugin. It worked great.

And if you load your manufacturer's print driver instead of using AirPrint, you'll have even more options in the Setup dialog.

This is very nice.

Downloading a Free Trial or Purchasing ON1 Effects 2021

You can try ON1 Effects 2021 free for 14 days. If you decide to purchase, you can buy for $69.95. Save 15% off that price by using coupon code: THEDIGITALSTORY.

Bottom Line

I started using ON1 Effects for my infrared photography because of its excellent Channel Mixer, LUTs, and presets. But I've discovered that it's useful for all of my photography. It's a robust tool for both my Photos and Capture One Pro workflows. And it's a great way to get the most out of my iPhone shots as well.

Next MacBook Air Powered by M2, To Come in Multiple Colors: Report

You can read the entire article on Petapixel.

If a new rumor is to be believed, Apple wasn't done using color with its new M1 iMac series: the design aesthetic is coming to the next MacBook Air as well.

Famed Apple leaker Jon Prosser, who has a pretty decent track record, has released a set of new renders that he says is indicative of MacBook Air designs he was shown from his own source at the company.

As reported by Digital Trends, the renders feature several notable changes to the current MacBook Air design. The most obvious change is that the computer will supposedly be available in one of seven colors: Silver, Blue. Yellow, Orange. Pink, Purple, and Green. Not coincidently, those are the same colors that Apple's newly-announced M1 iMacs are available in.

New Release: Capture One Pro 21 Essential Training

Capture One Pro is a complete digital photo management and editing application for professional photographers and serious enthusiasts. Photographers who appreciate outstanding RAW processing, expert color control, and logical organization should consider Capture One Pro for its comprehensive feature set. In this course, professional photographer and instructor Derrick Story helps you learn the basics quickly, then takes you deeper into the application to master its finer points. For seasoned users, Derrick also covers all the new features in version 21, including Speed Edit, the Dehaze slider, and Style Brushes that allow you to enhance specific areas of a photo. To wrap up, he shares tips and techniques that can help you ensure your workflow is as efficient as possible.

You can check it out now by visiting LinkedIn Learning.

The New Donation Kit for Carefree Shipping of Found Film Cameras

We have more time around the house than ever. And you finally dove into that bedroom closet that's been begging for some organization.

If you found a film camera that you're no longer using, our new Donation Kit makes it easy to pack and ship. Just visit the Contact Form on thenimblephotographer.com, click the box next to Donating a Film Camera, and let me know what you have. In your note, be sure to include your shipping address.

If it's a camera we can use for the shop, I'll send you a Donation Kit that includes a USPS Priority Mail shipping box and prepaid label. All you have to do is tape it up, insert the camera, and add the label. USPS will pick up your shipment from the front door of your house during their regular mail delivery. It's that simple!

Your donation help get analog gear in the hands of aspiring fine art photographers, and the proceeds help support this podcast.

Virtual Camera Club News

Photos for macOS Big Sur and iPhone Essential Training

This course was just released on LinkedIn Learning and lynda.com. It shows you how to leverage both the latest iPhone technology with Photos software, on both your Mac and mobile devices.

"With the free Photos for macOS software from Apple, you can manage, enhance, and share photos in a variety of ways. In this course, photographer, author, and educator Derrick Story takes you on a detailed exploration of Photos for macOS. Derrick starts with a quick-start introduction to taking pictures on your phone, then editing them with Photos and sharing them. He walks you through how to use the options available to you when you're recording video. Derrick also covers several advanced iPhone camera techniques, such as switching among cameras, controlling the flash, working with ProRAW, and more. He covers each step of the process to edit pictures in Photos for macOS, then does the same for editing videos. Derrick offers some useful tips to enhance your experience using Photos, then concludes with resources to help you learn more."

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts! (And welcome to our new members.)

My Writing on Medium.com: I now have more than 25 published articles on Medium.com. And if you haven't visited the site, and enjoy good writing on a variety of topics, I suggest that you may want to take a look. You can just go to the home page and enter "Derrick Story" in the search field. And if you like what you read, then follow me!

EV Explorers for Those Who Are Interested in Electric Cars: I've created a new group on DerrickStoryOnline titled EV Explorers. The tagline for this group is: "Bringing Curiosity and Nimbleosity to the World of Electric Vehicle Transportation." Here we can share information, tips, discoveries and more about using electric vehicles for our photography adventures. If you want to join this group, click on this link for an invite. We're going to keep this as a private group for now, but you are invited to join us.

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. In some cases, depending on the product, The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I truly enjoy using the iPhone 12 Pro Max with the HEIC file format for my everyday pictures. The results are terrific, and the file sizes are compact.

But when I want to have a little extra fun with those images, I've been firing up ON1 Effects 2021 that works as both a standalone app and as an Editing Extension for Photos for macOS. Effects has a wide variety of adjustments that work great with HEIC files (Jpegs and RAWs as well), and the workflow couldn't be easier.

Effects is also an excellent plugin for Photoshop, Lightroom, and Capture One Pro. The steps are similar as these.

Basic Steps to Using Effects as a Photos Editing Extension

Here are the basic steps that I use to add a little punch to my everyday pictures.

001-ON1-for-HEIC.jpg Step 1 - Go to Edit mode in Photos for macOS and choose ON1 Effects from the Extensions dropdown menu.

002-Apply-Filter.jpg Step 2 - Once you're in Effects, experiment with the Presets on the left side of the interface.

003-Add-Filters.jpg Step 3 - Further enhance your image by tapping a variety of adjustments. ON1 calls them Filters.

004-Enhanced.jpg Step 4 - Collapse the pallet on the left side to get a better look at your image before sending back to Photos. Click the Done button when satisfied with your work.

006-Back-to-Photos.jpg Step 5 - Back in Photos. Exit the editing interface by clicking on the yellow Done button.

More You Can Do with Effects

There are many different ways to approach ON1 Effects. It works as a standalone app. You can use it as an editing extension for Photos, as shown here. And it's a very nice plugin for Photoshop, Lightroom, and Capture One Pro 21.

I usually start with browsing presets to get a feel for where I might want to go with an image. For my infrared photography, I create my own presets as starting points. These include the red/blue channel swaps and other adjustments that I commonly use.

Beyond that, local adjustments are available, as are gradient masks and more. There's really no limit to what you can do with your pictures in this app.

Creating a Totally Non-Destructive Workflow with Effects and Photos

When you send an image from Apple Photos to Effects, any settings you apply will be saved with the image, so that you can send the image back to Effects with your edits intact, as long as you do not subsequently edit that image inside Photos.

To re-edit an image processed inside Effects, click on the image in Photos and follow the same steps above. When your image is opened inside Effects, you will see all of the changes you made in your previous session.

Keep in mind however, once you make any editing changes to your image inside Photos, your Effects edits will be "baked in" to the image. You can send the image again to Effects, but your original settings won't be visible.

If you wish to keep your original Effects edits, duplicate the image inside Photos (Image > Duplicate), which will create a new virtual copy of the file. You can then edit one of the versions in Photos, using the other one to preserve your Effects edits.

Downloading a Free Trial or Purchasing ON1 Effects 2021

You can try ON1 Effects 2021 free for 14 days. If you decide to purchase, you can buy for $69.95. Save 15% off that price by using coupon code: THEDIGITALSTORY.

Bottom Line

I started using ON1 Effects for my infrared photography because of its excellent Channel Mixer, LUTs, and presets. But I've discovered that it's useful for all of my photography. It's a robust tool for both my Photos and Capture One Pro workflows. And it's a great way to get the most out of my iPhone shots as well.

Product Links and Comments

There are product links in this article that contain affiliate tags. The Digital Story may receive compensation if you purchase a product via one of those links. There is no additional cost to you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When you visit our Workshops Signup Page, you'll see a variety of options. We feature physical events, such as the Oregon Coast Photography Workshop this coming November.

Scott-Davenport-US-Oregon-2018-11-09-0022-Along+Sweet+Creek+In+Oregon.jpg Photo by Scott Davenport

But we also offer Online Workshops and Video Trainings. The beauty of these is that you can enjoy them and learn from the comfort of your home. They're affordable and wildly popular.

So your photography experience doesn't require a plane ticket. Check out all of our Photography Events today. And when you see something you like, sign up.

We're looking forward to working with you.